Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Carol Burnett John Foster Dulles Song This is what put Carol Burnett on the showbiz map in 1957--her comedy song I Made A Fool Of Myself Over John Foster Dulles. (Dulles was the rather dour and boring Secretary of State at the time). Here she is performing it on The Ed Sullivan Show.
Tags: Carol  Burnett  John  Foster  Dulles 
Added: 2nd December 2007
Views: 12345
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Gibson Girl This is what the ideal of female beauty was from about 1895 to 1915. It was the Gibson Girl look--named after artist Charles Dana Gibson. His drawings often illustrated magazine stories of the era. They were likely the first type of mass media to influence the perception of what feminine beauty is. The stereotypical Gibson Girl was tall, had an extreme hourglass figure, with her hair (preferably curly) piled atop her head in a bouffant, pompadour, or chignon style. This photo is of stage actress Camille Clifford who epitomized the Gibson Girl look.
Tags: Gibson  Girl  Camille  Clifford 
Added: 3rd December 2007
Views: 2680
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Seven Seconds Two cultures, another great tune!
Tags: Youssou  N  Dour  Neneh  Cherry 
Added: 24th February 2008
Views: 1009
Rating:
Posted By: donmac101
Viktor Tikhonov - USSR Hockey Coach One of the most familiar faces of Soviet Union hockey was the dour puss of coach Viktor Tikhonov who ran the Central Red Army club team and the Soviet National team with an iron fist and almost unchecked success for 20 years. Tikhonov was born on June 4, 1930. As a player, Tikhonov was a defenceman with the Soviet Air Force and Dynamo Moscow clubs, but he wasn't well known internationally until he became the head coach of both the Central Red Army team and the Soviet Union's national team in 1977. At one point Red Army won 13 consecutive Soviet Elite League titles--which isn't all that surprising considering Tikhonov had the authority of a Red Army general and could immediately draft any player into the armed forces if he showed promise. The USSR won eight IIHF world titles under Tikhonov plus Olympic gold medals in 1984, 1988 and 1992. The USSR's national team also won the 1979 Challenge Cup and 1981 Canada Cup. Tikhonov had power over his players' lives and used it to control every aspect of his team. They routinely trained together for 50 weeks per year while living in army barracks. Canadian hockey great Phil Esposito said the so-called Soviet "amateurs" were more professional than NHL players. Humorless and ruthless, Tikhonov was known for his dictatorial coaching style. He exercised control over his players' lives. His expected absolute obedience--or else. His players quietly called him "the last Stalinist." With tongue-in-cheek humor, western media often referred to Tikhonov as "Chuckles." Tikhonov constantly feared his players would defect if they ever got the slightest chance. Anyone he merely suspected of defecting would be left off teams planning to travel outside the Iron Curtain. In 1991, for instance, he cut Pavel Bure, Valeri Zelepukin, Evgeny Davydov, and Vladimir Konstantinov just before the 1991 Canada Cup. All of them had been drafted by NHL teams, and Tikhonov suspected they were flight risks. Even after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Tikhonov stayed on as the national team coach of Russia for a few more years, but the newer players rebelled against his harsh authoritarian ways. Tikhonov mellowed slighty before going into retirement in 1996. After his retirement, Tikhonov lobbied the Russian government for more attention and better financing for the national team. His grandson plays on the current Russian national squad. Tikhonov died in November 2014.
Tags: hockey  coach  USSR  Viktor  Tikhonov 
Added: 19th February 2014
Views: 931
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1912 British Olympic Womens Swim Team These four swimmers represented Great Britain at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm. They won the gold medal in the 4 x 100 relay. My research says they are Belle Moore, Jennie Fletcher, Annie Speirs, and Irene Steer, although I don't know which one is which. (I don't know who the dour lady in the middle is. A chaperon or coach, perhaps? She looks like a million laughs.) Women's swimming made its debut in these 1912 Olympics. The British team's winning time was five minutes, 52.8 seconds. By comparison, the gold-medal-winning time of the Australian team at the 2008 Beijing Olympics was three minutes, 52.69 seconds--more than two full minutes ahead of the 1912 pace. The entire 1912 Olympic swimming program was contested in just one day.
Tags: Olympics  swimming  British  women 
Added: 21st September 2010
Views: 4041
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
WWII: Massacre at Oradour-Sur-Glane On June 10, 1944, four days after the Allied D-Day landings in Normandy, German SS troops descended on a small, peaceful French village, Oradour-Sur-Glane, in which about 700 people lived. In a matter of a few hours, Oradour-Sur-Glane ceased to exist. Virtually every person who lived there was indiscriminately shot or burned alive. Every building was also destroyed. After the war, the French government decided to leave Oradour-Sur-Glane's ruins as they stood as a solemn reminder of the horrors of war.
Tags: Second  World  War  massacre  Oradour-Sur  Glane 
Added: 7th November 2012
Views: 3650
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random