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Remco Toys Monkey Division Whirlybird 1964 A mint in the box Remco Whirlybird. Remco made many variations of this whirlybird. This is the Monkey Division variation. Monkey Division was a line of toys Remco made and touted it as their "Guerilla War" line of toys. The had helmets, guns, rifles, bazookas, etc. Another wildly popular 60s toy put out during the Vietnam era. Toys glorifying war began to wane when the reports of scores of soliders getting killed filled our TV screens and the "Living Room War" we viewed on the news became unpopular, also it was more fun to make Love not War and the hippie era was ushered in. Parents began to object to toys glorifying war. The set also came with 25 soldiers, a tank, a jeep and truck. The whirlybird also carried all the stuff and had a working cargo hoist too. You are looking at a rarity. The soliders etc. are not shown but are still in their original package. I've often wondered how some of these toys these toys remain unplayed with? Perhaps it is old store stock and I've also heard that sometimes parents would leave the room of a deceased child the way it was when they passed. That is kind of creepy to me.
Tags: remco  whirlybird  helicopter  toys  classic 
Added: 14th August 2007
Views: 7156
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Posted By: dezurtdude
Willie and Joe Perhaps some of you may remember "Willie and Joe." The two World War II infantry grunts created by Bill Mauldin. His famous infantrymen cartoons were featured in "Stars and Stripes," the American soldier's newspaper. The cartoons would depict life as the average American soldier would live it during wartime. Some were comical, others brought home the ugliness and tragedies of war. He didn't get along very well with most officers because would poke fun at them in his cartoons. This would irritate the younger officers and some older ones alike. Gen. George Patton wanted him to stop drawing his cartoons but apparently the morale of the American soldier and the popularity of the cartoons and the good effect that "Willie and Joe" had on it won out even over the General's wishes. These two cartoons came from the first collection of his work compiled in a book alled, "Up Front," which was a best-seller. At age 23 he won the Pulitzer Prize. That was in 1945. He was assigned to the 45th infantry division, and was wounded by a shell fragment in Anzio for which he receive the Purple Heart. He also made the cover of Time Magazine in 1958. Bill passed away in 2003 at the age of 81. Bill Mauldin was a great American!
Tags: willie  joe  wwii  bill  mauldin  stars  strpes  cartoons 
Added: 17th September 2007
Views: 3232
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Posted By: jimmyjet
The Andrew Sisters Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy This really fits after Teresa's post of the Andrew Sisters. At the beginning of World War II, the War department, through the Army Services Forces Special Services Division, distributed thousands of shellac phonograph records (V DISCS) to Army Forces throughout the world, this was one of them.
Tags: the  andrew  sisters  boogie  woogie  bugle  boy    WWII  music 
Added: 5th October 2007
Views: 2573
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Posted By: Naomi
Sugar Ray Leonard Wins Olympic Gold This is the complete three rounds of Sugar Ray Leonard's gold-medal-winning bout the in the light welterweight division at the 1976 Montreal Olympics. His opponent, Andres Aldama of Cuba, had won his previous five Olympic bouts of this Olympic tournament by knockout. The commentary is by Howard Cosell and George Foreman.
Tags: Sugar  Ray  Leonard  Olympic  boxing 
Added: 24th May 2008
Views: 1563
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Posted By: Lava1964
Harry Truman Assassination Attempt An assassination attempt on President Harry Truman occurred on November 1, 1950. It was perpetrated by two Puerto Rican pro-independence activists, Oscar Collazo and Griselio Torresola. It occurred while Truman was residing at Blair House during extensive White House renovations. The attempt resulted in the deaths of White House police officer Leslie Coffelt, and Torresola. Truman was unharmed. Torresola walked up Pennsylvania Avenue from the west side while his partner, Oscar Collazo, walked up to Capital police officer Donald Birdzell on the steps of Blair House. Approaching Birdzell from behind, Collazo pulled out a handgun, pointed it at the officer's back, and pulled the trigger. Since he had failed to cock it, nothing happened. Collazo managed to fire the weapon just as Birdzell was turning to face him, striking the officer in his right knee. Secret Service agent Floyd Boring and White House police officer Joseph Davidson heard the shot and opened fire on Collazo. Collazo returned fire and soon found himself outgunned as the wounded Birdzell joined the shootout. Soon after, Collazo was struck by two rounds in the head and right arm, while other officers joined the gunfight. Torresola approached a guard booth at the west corner of Blair House where an officer, Private Leslie Coffelt, was sitting inside. Torresola quickly pivoted from left to right around the opening of the booth. Coffelt was taken completely by surprise. Torresola fired four shots from his Luger at close range. Three shots struck Coffelt in the chest and abdomen, a fourth went through his tunic. Coffelt slumped in his chair, mortally wounded. Torresola turned his attention to plainclothes White House policeman Joseph Downs. Downs, who had just chatted with Coffelt, proceeded down the walkway to the basement door at the west end of the Blair-Lee house when he heard shots. Downs noticed Torresola, but he was shot in the hip before he could draw his weapon. Downs turned back towards the house, and was shot twice more by Torresola, once in the back and once in the neck. Downs staggered to the basement door, opened it, slid in, and then slammed the door behind him, denying Torresola entry into Blair House. Torresola turned his attention to the shoot-out between his partner, Collazo, and several other law enforcement officers. Torresola saw wounded policeman Donald Birdzell aiming at Collazo from the south side of Pennsylvania Avenue. Torresola aimed and shot Birdzell in the left knee from a distance of approximately 40 feet. Now shot in both knees, Birdzell was effectively incapacitated. (He would later recover.) Soon after, the severely wounded Collazo was hit in the chest by a ricochet shot from Davidson and was incapacitated too. Torresola stood to the immediate left of Blair House steps while he reloaded. At the same time, Truman, who had been napping in his second-floor bedroom, was awoken by the gunfire. Truman went to his bedroom window, opened it, and looked outside. From where he stood reloading, Torresola was 31 feet away from that window. It is unknown whether either man saw the other. At the same time, the wounded Coffelt staggered out of his guard booth, leaned against it, and aimed his revolver at Torresola, who was approximately 30 feet away. Coffelt fired, hitting Torresola two inches above the ear, killing him instantly. Coffelt himself died four hours later. Officer Coffelt's widow, Cressie E. Coffelt, was asked by the President and the Secretary of State to go to Puerto Rico, where she received condolences from various Puerto Rican leaders and crowds. Mrs. Coffelt always absolved the island's people of blame for the acts of the two gunmen. A plaque at Blair House commemorates Coffelt's sacrifice and heroism. The day room for the U.S. Secret Service's Uniformed Division at Blair House is also named for Coffelt.
Tags: Harry  Truman  assassination  attempt 
Added: 21st January 2011
Views: 2380
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Posted By: Lava1964
Weightlifter Vasili Alexeyev 1942-2011 It has been reported that Vasili Alexeyev, the Soviet weightlifter who utterly dominated the super-heavyweight division of the sport during most of the 1970s, died in Germany on November 25, 2011 at the age of 69. He was at a clinic seeking treatment for a serious heart ailment. Alexeyev easily won gold medals at both the 1972 and 1976 Olympics and won eight straight world championships from 1970 to 1977. (The Olympics doubled as weightlifting's world championships in 1972 and 1976.) Alexeyev, who set 80 world records in his career, was listed as a "mining engineer" by Soviet sports authorities. Alexeyev was the first man to lift 500 pounds in competition. But his fans were fickle: When the 38-year-old Alexeyev failed to make any of his three lifts at the 1980 Moscow Olympics, he was jeered off the stage. In a 1971 interview, the affable Alexeyev said he liked to spend his spare time reading Agatha Christie mystery novels.
Tags: weightlifting  Vasili  Alexeyev 
Added: 28th November 2011
Views: 4572
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Posted By: Lava1964
1932 NFL Championship Game One of the most important games in the history of the National Football League was the 1932 NFL Championship Game. It provided many firsts: Most significantly it was the NFL's first championship game--and it was the first NFL game to be played indoors. Prior to 1933 there was no official league championship game. The league title went to the team with the best record--which was often disputed because teams did not play anything resembling a balanced schedule. In 1932, both the Chicago Bears and Portsmouth (OH) Spartans had six wins and a loss. By rule, tie games were ignored in the standings. Portsmouth had four ties and the Bears had six! During the regular season, both games between the Bears and Spartans had ended in ties. With the NFL's blessings, the Bears and Spartans agreed to play a one-game tie-breaker at Chicago's Wrigley Field on December 18. However, a forecast of a blizzard and minus-40-degree temperatures prompted the game to be moved indoors to Chicago Stadium, an arena more suited for hockey than football. Dirt from a recent circus was spread on the arena's concrete floor to form somethin akin to a regular gridiron. The cozy confines forced some playing rules to be revised. Because there were only 80 yards between the goal lines, as soon as a team advanced the ball beyond midfield, it was moved back 20 yards! The goalposts were moved from the endline to the goal line (where they stayed until 1974). Also, because the field was ten yards narrower than usual, before every play from scrimmage the ball was placed between hashmarks ten yards from the sideline. Chicago won the game 9-0, all their points coming in the fourth quarter on a controversial forward-pass touchdown and a safety. (The touchdown play caused the NFL's passing rules to be modernized the following season.) Not long afterward the Spartans moved to Detroit and became the Lions. The game was a huge success and inspired the NFL to split itself into two divisions and hold an annual championship game between the divisional champs. That system determined the NFL champion each year until the Super Bowl era began in 1966.
Tags: football  NFL  1932  Championship 
Added: 14th January 2012
Views: 2720
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Posted By: Lava1964
Sealtest Ice Cream Sealtest Dairy was a division of National Dairy Products Corporation (predecessor to Kraft Foods, Inc.) of Delaware. The brand name was later acquired by Ault Foods of Toronto, Ontario and used on dairy products sold in Canada. The Sealtest plant in Toronto took over operations of Silverwood Dairy, the local dairy, in the 1980s. Sealtest brand is now licensed by Natrel.
Tags: Sealtest,  ice  cream,  Silverwood  Dairy,Natrel   
Added: 8th June 2012
Views: 4976
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Posted By: pfc
The Liberator The Liberator was very cheap to manufacture and easy to mass-produce gun that could be dropped in large quantities over Europe to arm the resistance forces. Manufactured by the Guide Lamp Division of General Motors they cost $2.40 to make, about $30 2010 money. The weapons were not mass-dropped over Europe. More of these were dropped into China and the Philippines during World War II
Tags: The  Liberator  gun  resistance  forces    Guide  Lamp  Division  weapons  cheap  weapons  Europe  China  Philippines  World  War  II     
Added: 30th August 2012
Views: 3604
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Posted By: pfc
Leo Randolph - Forgotten Olympian The 1976 American Olympic boxing team won five gold medals, one silver, and one bronze. Four of the gold medallists eventually won professional world titles. Though largely forgotten today, Leo Randolph was one of them. Randolph, a resident of Tacoma, WA, won the flyweight division at the Montreal Olympics at age 18. (In the gold-medal match against Cuba's Ramon Duvalon, many boxing fans thought Randolph was the recipient of a generous decision.) Randolph waited nearly two years before turning professional. In the interim he finished high school and worked at a Boeing aircraft factory. Randolph's early pro opponents, in most cases, left a lot to be desired as there are few quality pro boxers in the lightest weight categories in North America. Nevertheless, Randolph beat Colombia's Ricardo Cardona for the WBA junior featherweight title on May 4, 1980 with a 15th-round knockout. However, in his first defense of his title just three months later, Randolph was totally outclassed by Sergio Palma of Argentina. The challenger battered Randolph and won the title with a sixth-round technical knockout. Saying his heart was no longer in boxing, Randolph collected his $72,000 purse and promptly retired after the bout at age 22, compiling a pro record of 17-2. In a 1996 "Where Are They Now?" feature in Sports Illustrated, Randolph was happily employed as a bus driver for Pierce Transit in the Pacific northwest.
Tags: boxing  Leo  Randolph  Olympics 
Added: 27th December 2012
Views: 969
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Posted By: Lava1964

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