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     Modern Screen Magazine  60s a distant forerunner of the schlock they publish today.
Tags: modern  screen  magazines  entertainment  celebrities 
Added: 18th August 2007
Views: 1720
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Kim Novak the Lavender Blonde Kim Novak was born Marilyn Pauline Novak in Chicago, Illinois. She is perhaps best known for her performance in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo (1958). Her films include The French Line (1954) Pushover (1954) Phffft! (1954) Son of Sinbad (1955) 5 Against the House (1955) Picnic (1955) The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) The Eddy Duchin Story (1956) Jeanne Eagels (1957) Pal Joey (1957) Vertigo (1958) Bell, Book and Candle (1958) Middle of the Night (1959) Strangers When We Meet (1960) Pepe (1960) (Cameo) The Notorious Landlady (1962) Boys' Night Out (1962) Showman (1963) (documentary) Of Human Bondage (1964) Kiss Me, Stupid (1964) The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965) The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968) The Great Bank Robbery (1969) The White Buffalo (1977) Just a Gigolo (1979) The Mirror Crack'd (1980) I Have Been Very Pleased (1987) (short subject) The Children (1990) Liebestraum (1991) She has always been one of my favorite actresses and I think she's one of the most underrated and overlooked actresses of her generation. Kim Novak was a unique phenomenon. As the last of the "manufactured" screen goddesses and Columbia's answer to Marilyn Monroe, Kim had a more refined sex appeal than the other blond goddesses of the 1950's. She radiated a kind of mystery that harked back to the days of Garbo and Dietrich. Onscreen Kim Novak seems distant, enigmatic, thoughtful and somehow sad. She has been referred to as the reluctant goddess, the melancholy blonde and the lavender blonde. The studio created the idea that lavender was Kim Novak's favorite color as part of her movie star image. However, I think the term Lavender Blonde fits Kim Novak - it sets her apart from the sunny Doris Day or the gilded Marilyn Monroe. Lavender is closer to blue - makes you think of Madeleine in Vertigo, lost in thought by the seashore.
Tags: kim  novak  actresses  vertigo 
Added: 27th September 2007
Views: 4911
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Posted By: Naomi
Leopold and Loeb murder case 1924 One of the most despicable murder cases in the twentieth century was that of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, residents of suburban Chicago, who murdered 14-year-old Bobby Franks in 1924. Their motive: They wanted to kill for the thrill of it and commit the perfect crime. Both Leopold, age 20, and Loeb, age 19, were exceptionally brilliant students who considered themselves intellectual supermen. On May 21, 1924 they lured Bobby Franks (a distant relative of Loeb) into a rented car. Franks was bludgeoned with a chisel and suffocated with a sock. His body was dumped into a culvert in Gary, Indiana and doused with acid to make identification difficult. The culprits mailed a typed ransom note to Franks' parents indicating that Bobby had been kidnapped. However, Franks' body was found before any ransom could be paid. Also found near the body were a pair of eye glasses that fell from Loeb's pocket during the crime. The glasses were almost unique--only three pairs had been made by a certain optician--and they led the police to Loeb. The two young men, who were reputedly homosexual lovers, were questioned and their alibis discredited. Each eventually confessed his involvement in the crime, but insisted the other was responsible for the actual murder. They were brought to trial for murder and kidnapping. Their lawyer, the famous Clarence Darrow, entered pleas of guilty in order to avoid a jury deciding the twosome's fate--which likely would have been a death sentence. Instead Darrow argued with a judge to spare his guilty clients from the death penalty. Darrow gave a rousing 12-hour oration that spared his clients' lives. Instead Leopold and Loeb were each given life sentences plus 99 years. Loeb was murdered in prison in 1936. Leopold was pardoned in 1958 and died of a heart attack in 1971. Bobby Franks, often forgotten by history, remains 14 years old forever.
Tags: Leopold  Loeb  Franks 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2816
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Posted By: Lava1964
Suzanne Pleshette  Dies Jan 19th 2008  She Will Be Missed Suzanne Pleshette, the husky-voiced star best known for her role as Bob Newhart's sardonic wife, Emily, on television's long-running "The Bob Newhart Show," has died at age 70. Pleshette, whose career included roles in such films as Hitchcock's "The Birds" and in Broadway plays including "The Miracle Worker," died of respiratory failure Saturday evening at her Los Angeles home, said her attorney Robert Finkelstein, also a family friend. Pleshette underwent chemotherapy for lung cancer in 2006. "The Bob Newhart Show, a hit throughout its six-year run, starred comedian Newhart as a Chicago psychiatrist surrounded by eccentric patients. Pleshette provided the voice of reason. Four years after the show ended in 1978, Newhart went on to the equally successful "Newhart" series in which he was the proprietor of a New England inn populated by more eccentrics. When that show ended in 1990, Pleshette reprised her role - from the first show - in one of the most clever final episodes in TV history. It had Newhart waking up in the bedroom of his "The Bob Newhart Show" home with Pleshette at his side. He went on to tell her of the crazy dream he'd just had of running an inn filled with eccentrics. "If I'm in Timbuktu, I'll fly home to do that," Pleshette said of her reaction when Newhart told her how he was thinking of ending the show. Born Jan. 31, 1937, in New York City, Pleshette began her career as a stage actress after attending the city's High School of the Performing Arts and studying at its Neighborhood Playhouse. She was often picked for roles because of her beauty and her throaty voice. "When I was 4," she told an interviewer in 1994, "I was answering the phone, and (the callers) thought I was my father. So I often got quirky roles because I was never the conventional ingenue." She met her future husband, Tom Poston, when they appeared together in the 1959 Broadway comedy "The Golden Fleecing," but didn't marry him until more than 40 years later. Although the two had a brief fling, they went on to marry others. By 2000 both were widowed and they got back together, marrying the following year. "He was such a wonderful man. He had fun every day of his life," Pleshette said after Poston died in April 2007. Among her other Broadway roles was replacing Anne Bancroft in "The Miracle Worker," the 1959 drama about Helen Keller, in New York and on the road. Meanwhile, she had launched her film career with Jerry Lewis in 1958 in "The Geisha Boy." She went on to appear in numerous television shows, including "Have Gun, Will Travel,""Alfred Hitchcock Presents,""Playhouse 90" and "Naked City." By the early 1960s, Pleshette attracted a teenage following with her youthful roles in such films as "Rome Adventure,""Fate Is the Hunter,""Youngblood Hawke" and "A Distant Trumpet." She married fellow teen favorite Troy Donahue, her co-star in "Rome Adventure," in 1964 but the union lasted less than a year. She was married to Texas oilman Tim Gallagher from 1968 until his death in 2000. Pleshette matured in such films as Hitchcock's "The Birds" and the Disney comedies "The Ugly Dachshund,""Blackbeard's Ghost" and "The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin." Over the years, she also had a busy career in TV movies, including playing the title role in 1990's "Leona Helmsley, the Queen of Mean." More recently, she appeared in several episodes of the TV sitcoms "Will & Grace" and "8 Simple Rules ... For Dating My Teenage Daughter." In a 1999 interview, Pleshette observed that being an actress was more important than being a star. "I'm an actress, and that's why I'm still here," she said. "Anybody who has the illusion that you can have a career as long as I have and be a star is kidding themselves."
Tags: suzanne  pleshette  bob  newhart  show    tom  poston  cancer 
Added: 20th January 2008
Views: 2076
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Posted By: Sophia
Distant Drums As a kid my Gran always seem to play Scottish country dance and classical music. Imagine my surpise when one day I heard this coming from her record player. Made me love the music of Jim Reeves to this day.
Tags: Jim  Reeves  Distant  Drums 
Added: 27th April 2008
Views: 1487
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Posted By: donmac101
Suzan Ball - - -  Lucys Cousin Sultry Suzan Ball, a distant cousin of Lucille Ball, was a starlet in the early 1950s under contract to Universal. While filming East of Sumatra (1953; with Jeff Chandler), Ball injured her right leg, which was later found to be cancerous. Her leg was eventually amputated below the knee. By 1955, the cancer had spread to her lungs, and she passed away in August 1955 at the age of 22. Ball married actor Richard Long in 1954, leaving him a widower just a year later.
Tags: Suzan  Ball  Lucille  Ball  East  of  Sumatra  Jeff  Chandler  Richard  Long   
Added: 22nd April 2008
Views: 2182
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Posted By: Old Fart
The Polo Grounds The Polo Grounds was the home stadium for baseball's New York Giants from 1883 to 1957. There were actually four stadiums that were called The Polo Grounds. This is the last and most famous. Its horseshoe shape created some odd dimensions. The foul lines ran for a mere 257 feet but the the distant center field bleachers were 505 feet away from home plate. This ballpark was where Willie Mays made his spectacular catch during the 1954 World Series and where Bobby Thomson hit baseball's most famous home run in 1951. Oh, yes: The first stadium was built for polo in 1876, but after the Giants acquired it for baseball in 1883, no polo matches were ever played there again.
Tags: Polo  Grounds  baseball 
Added: 27th June 2008
Views: 1429
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Posted By: Lava1964
Star Wars  Dont Smoke PSA Here's a Public Service Annoucement from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services featuring C3PO and R2D2 from Star Wars warning about the dangers of smoking. "A Message From A Distant Galaxy Far, Far Away" This aired on local Chicago TV on Wednesday, July 15th 1981.
Tags: star  wars  psa 
Added: 9th October 2008
Views: 1297
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Posted By: rickfmdj
Clara Bow Swastika Outfit Here's something from the distant past: Clara Bow, the most popular Hollywood actress at the end of the silent-film era, sports a swastika-decorated outfit in the 1920s! Was Bow a Nazi? Of course not! Before the rise of Naziism in the 1930s, swastikas were sometimes used as decorations because of their symmetrical geometry.
Tags: Clara  Bow  swastika  outfit 
Added: 26th January 2014
Views: 4435
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Posted By: Lava1964
1905 Dawson City Nuggets One of the great sports stories of the twentieth century was the improbable challenge for the Stanley Cup made by the Dawson City Nuggets back in 1905. The Cup was still a challenge trophy at the time, and somehow a group of recreational hockey players from the distant Yukon Territory was granted permission by the Cup's trustees to play the powerful Ottawa Silver Seven for Lord Stanley's hardware in 1905. Now all they had to do was travel 4,400 miles to Ottawa for the best-of three series. The Nuggets made their way to the Canadian capital by bicycle, dog sled, boat, railroad, and on foot. They arrived in Ottawa exhausted just one day before the first game was scheduled. They promptly lost 9-2. The next game was even worse. The defending champs from Ottawa won 23-2. Frank McGee notched 14 goals for the winners.
Tags: Dawson  CIty  Nuggets  hockey 
Added: 15th June 2009
Views: 1429
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Posted By: Lava1964

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