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First Commercial filmed in 1897 Another Thomas Edison discovery the first known film advertisement.
Tags: Thomas  Edison  Admiral  Cigarettes  First  Film  Advertisement  1897 
Added: 3rd May 2008
Views: 1501
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Posted By: pfc
Cardiff Giant Hoax 1869 The first great hoax in American history was the Cardiff Giant. In 1868, a wealthy American tobacconist and atheist named George Hull got into an argument with a minister about a passage in the book of Genesis that claimed that giant men once walked the earth. Inspired, Hull decided to create a fake petrified giant and foist it on the gullible public. He hired men in Fort Dodge, Iowa to carve him a 10-foot long block of gypsum. (Hull told them it was for a monument to Abraham Lincoln.) Hull sent the gypsum block to a stonecutter in Chicago to have it secretly carved into the likeness of a man. Once the work was completed, Hull had the carving sent to his cousin's farm in Cardiff, New York. There Hull artificially aged his giant with acid and buried it in the ground for 11 months. On October 16, 1869, two men hired to dig a well 'found' the giant. (This photo shows it being 'exhumed' from Hull's hiding place.) The story of the giant's discovery spread like wildfire. Hull initially charged the curious public 25 cents apiece to view the giant. He later upped the price to 50 cents. Despite scientists universally claiming the Cardiff Giant to be a hoax, Hull sold it for $37,500 to a five-man syndicate headed by David Hannon and laughed all the way to the bank. (The hoax had cost Hull about $2,600, so the sale netted him more than 14 times what he had spent!) P.T. Barnum tried to buy or rent the giant from Hannon for $60,000, but his offer was refused. Not to be outdone, Barnum had his own giant made, displayed it at his museum, and declared Hannon's giant was a fake! On December 10, Hull publicly confessed to his hoax. Meanwhile Hannon and Barnum were busily suing and countersuing each other over who possessed the real Cardiff Giant. Only in America...
Tags: Cardiff  Giant  hoax 
Added: 10th July 2008
Views: 13593
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hunchback of Notre Dame Trailer 1939 Here's the theatrical trailer for The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939). Note that Maureen O'Hara was billed as a new screen discovery!
Tags: Hunchback  of  Notre  Dame  trailer 
Added: 12th September 2008
Views: 1147
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Posted By: Lava1964
Professor Kitzel More memories from my childhood: The Wonderful Stories of Professor Kitzel. The animated professor would introduce short, entertaining lessons about history, science, geography, and foreign cultures. They were great! This episode is about the discovery of King Tut's tomb. Kids today are so deprived of good stuff like this!
Tags: Professor  Kitzel 
Added: 27th November 2008
Views: 2692
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Posted By: Lava1964
Marion Parker Murder - 1927 Fair warning: This story is unsettling. One of the most brutal crimes in American history was the kidnapping and murder of 12-year-old schoolgirl Marion Parker. On Thursday, December 15, 1927 a young man appeared at Mount Vernon Junior High School in Los Angeles claiming to be an associate of Perry Parker, a prominent local banker. The man coolly told the school's registrar that the banker had been seriously injured in a car accident and had requested to speak to his daughter. There were actually twin Parker sisters enrolled in the school--Marion and Marjorie. By chance the registrar fetched Marion who rode off with the man. He was later identified as 19-year-old William Edward Hickman. The Parker family became alarmed when Marion did not return from school. Shortly thereafter they received a ransom note and phone calls from the kidnapper asking for $1500 in gold certificates in exchange for Marion's safe return. One attempt by Marion's father to pay the ransom was thwarted when Hickman spotted police detectives lurking nearby. Another meeting time was secretly arranged by Hickman and Marion's father on December 17 where the money was given to a man in a parked car. Perry Parker saw his daughter wrapped in a blanket slumped in the back seat with her eyes open. At gunpoint the ransom was paid and the driver pushed the girl onto the street and drove away. Marion's father was horrified to find that his daughter was dead. Her eyelids had been sewn open to give the illusion that she was alive. Worse, her head had been severed, her arms and legs had been cut off and she had been disemboweled. (The missing limbs were found the next day in a city park.) The ghastly crime spawned the largest manhunt in southern California's history, one that included 20,000 volunteers. A reward of $100,000 was offered for the capture of the culprit. Several clues, including the discovery of the stolen car used on the night of the money exchange, led to Hickman being named as the key suspect. He was eventually arrested in Echo, OR after spending some of the gold certificates there. Hickman had been a former employee at Parker's bank and had been fired for embezzlement in a forged check scam. He served prison time for the crime. The fingerprint records from the embezzlement charge were used to match those found on the stolen car from the kidnapping. Hickman willingly told police in graphic detail that he had decided to kill Marion because she had discovered his name. She had only been dead about 12 hours before the money exchange. Hickman said he had choked her with a towel to make her unconscious and then began his dismemberment while she was still alive. Hickman--who said he intended to use the $1500 to pay his tuition to attend a bible college!--hoped to avoid the gallows by claiming insanity. He was one of the first defendants in California to try that ploy after it had become an acceptable legal defense. It failed when a fellow prisoner claimed Hickman had asked his advice on how to appear crazy. A jury rejected Hickman's insanity defense in February 1928. Hickman was executed at San Quentin Prison eight months later on October 19. His hand-written confession is on display at the Los Angeles Police Museum. Marion Parker's ghost is said to occupy her former house.
Tags: Marion  Parker  murder  kidnapping  1927 
Added: 13th April 2015
Views: 1452
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Posted By: Lava1964
Declaration of Independence Copy Found in Picture Frame Fans of flea markets and garage sales were heartened by this improbable story from the spring of 1991: A collector who spent $4 at a Pennsylvania flea market two years ago for a dismal painting because he liked the frame is the possessor of a rare first printing of the Declaration of Independence. It is valued somewhere between $800,000 and $1 million. David N. Redden, head of the book and manuscript department at Sotheby's in Manhattan, described the document, found behind the painting when the collector took the frame apart, as an 'unspeakably fresh copy' of the declaration. 'The fact that it has been in the backing of the frame preserved it,' he said. Of the 24 copies known to survive, only three are in private hands. Mr. Redden said the unidentified owner bought the painting, 'a dismal dark country scene with a signature he could not make out,' only for its gilded and ornately carved frame. He told Mr. Redden that he discarded the painting, which he disliked. When he realized the frame was crudely made and unsalvageable he got rid of it too. 'But he kept the declaration, which he had found behind the painting,' Mr. Redden said. 'It was folded up, about the size of a business envelope. He thought it might be an early 19th-century printing and worth keeping as a curiosity.' Recently the owner showed it to a friend 'who urged him to look into it further,' said Selby Kiffer, an Americana printing specialist at Sotheby's 'At that point he called us.' Said Kiffer, 'The discovery of any first-printing copy of the declaration, even a fragmentary one or a poor copy, would be exciting, but on this one, the condition is beyond reproach. It was folded up when we first saw it--the way the owner said it was in the painting, less than one-tenth of an inch thick. I had to agree with him it was just as well that he kept it that way. There has been absolutely no restoration, no repair. It was unframed and unbacked.' Only seven of the 24 copies are unbacked, he said, which increases their value. 'The ink was still wet on this copy when it was folded,' Mr. Kiffer said. The very first line -- 'In Congress, July 4, 1776' -- shows up in the bottom margin in reverse, as a faint offsetting or shadow printing, one more proof of the urgency John Dunlap, the printer, and others felt in dispersing this document.
Tags: Declaration  of  Independence  copy  found 
Added: 10th February 2011
Views: 5923
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Posted By: Lava1964
Make A Wish Does anyone remember a kids' show called Make A Wish? It aired on ABC from 1971 to 1976. Produced by ABC News, it was hosted by musician Tom Chapin and created and produced by Lester Cooper. It replaced Discovery, a similar series for children also produced by ABC News. The series, originally broadcast on Saturday mornings but later moved to Sunday mornings, focused on a particular theme. One episode, for instance, would be about snakes; another about motorcycles. Chapin would introduce the topic in much the same manner: "I think a snake is what I'll be. Imagine all the possibilities." After that there would be a sort of free association featuring stock footage, animation, and Chapin's music and voiceover commentary. The series won a Peabody Award for Best Children's Series in 1971. The music performed on the show was written by Tom's brother, Harry Chapin. The shows relied heavily on stock footage that was cleverly edited and seemed to make sense with the running narrative of words and music. TV critics loved it. Apparently, because of licensing nightmares with the numerous owners of the stock footage and music, Make A Wish won't be available on DVD anytime soon.
Tags: Tom  Chapin  Make  A  Wish  educational  television 
Added: 8th September 2011
Views: 1636
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shuttle Discovery last ride NASA Video of Discovery going to her final resting place at the Smithsonian. A sad day indeed.
Tags: Shuttle  Discovery  NASA  Fly  over  Washington 
Added: 18th April 2012
Views: 1138
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Posted By: Marty6697
Nickelodeon Commercials December 26 1994 Nickelodeon Commercials December 26, 1994 1. Station ID: Bumper Mish-Mash 2. Nickelodeon On VHS: Rock's Modern Life: "How Can You Tell If Your Dog Is Brainless" 3. Bumper Mish-Mash Reprise 4. Purebred Pet Groomer (I have one of these, if you can believe that.) 5. Station ID: Shooting Star 6. Up Next: Clock: Mr Wizard and Flipper 7. Nick News Year's 95 Promo 8. Discovery Zone 9. Nickelodeon GUTS on SNES 10. Credits Promo: Captain Stimpy: Flipper Is Next 11. Station ID: The First Kids Network 12. DRUGS PSA 13. Power Rangers "Power Coins" (Read: Pogs) at Mcdonalds 14. Christmas Station ID: Snow Globe 15. Nickelodeon Magazine: Spider (Fun Fact: That Issue Does Not Exist. Not With That Cover Anyway.) 16. Nick Days: The First Day of Kwanza 17. Up Next: Clock: Flipper and Bullwinkle's Moose-O-Rama 18. Nick New Year's Resolutions 19. Apple Jacks 94: Camp Leewood 20. Nickelodeon Video: A Christmas Carol (Wait, WHAT?)
Tags: Nickelodeon  Commercials  December  1994 
Added: 18th August 2012
Views: 2612
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Posted By: masonx31
Eliot Spitzer Scandal Eliot Spitzer was the governor of New York for a little over a year before a call girl scandal forced his resignation. On March 10, 2008, The New York Times reported that Spitzer had patronized a high-priced prostitution service called Emperors Club VIP and met for over two hours with a $1,000-an-hour call girl going by the name Ashley Alexandra Dupré, pictured here. (Her legal name: Ashley Rae Maika DiPietro, but she was born Ashley Youmans) This information originally came to the attention of authorities from a federal wiretap. Spitzer, a Democrat, had at least seven or eight liaisons with women from the agency over six months, and paid more than $15,000. According to published reports, investigators believe Spitzer paid up to $80,000 for prostitutes over a period of several years while he was the state's Attorney General, and later as Governor. Spitzer first drew the attention of federal investigators when his bank reported suspicious money transfers, which initially led investigators to believe that Spitzer may have been hiding bribe proceeds. The investigation of the governor led to the discovery of the prostitution ring. In the wake of the revelations, Spitzer announced on March 12, 2008 that he would resign his post as governor at noon on March 17, 2008, amid threats of his impeachment by state lawmakers. "I cannot allow for my private failings to disrupt the people's work," Spitzer said at a news conference in New York City. "Over the course of my public life, I have insisted – I believe correctly – that people take responsibility for their conduct. I can and will ask no less of myself. For this reason, I am resigning from the office of governor."
Tags: Eliot  Spitzer  scandal  prostitution 
Added: 13th March 2013
Views: 705
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Posted By: Lava1964

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