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Americas Sweetheart at 61 Happy Birthday to Sally Field! Sally is the daughter of actress Margaret Field and step-father Jock Mahoney, also an actor as well as a stuntman. Sally managed to finish high school, but early on it was clear she would follow in her parents' footsteps, and she soon got the lead role in the 1965 TV series "Gidget", quickly followed by "The Flying Nun" which ran from 1967-1970. American was in love with her wholesome, girl-next-door persona. The role that got Sally noticed as a more serious dramatic actress, was her portrayal of the title character in the TV movie Sybil, a woman suffering from a multiple personality disorder. The part won her an Emmy in the Best Actress category in 1976. Hollywood now saw Sally Field as more than just a pretty face. She had raw talent they were more than happy to exploit. But Sally didn't altogether abondon her comedic side and proved this by starring opposite Burt Reynolds in the two Smokey And The Bandit films. Nevertheless, her best work came through in dramatic roles, and Sally went on to win Oscars in the Best Actress category for both Norma Rae and Places In The Heart. Aside from acting, she has also produced and directed several projects for television, including directing an episode of the acclaimed mini-series, From The Earth To The Moon. Sally has two sons from her first marriage, Peter and Eli. And Samuel, from her second marriage.
Tags: sally  field  gidget  flying  nun  norma  rae  sybil  actresses 
Added: 5th November 2007
Views: 1797
Rating:
Posted By: Guido
The Comedy of Nichols and May This is one of the funniest sketches I've ever seen. It's about as close to the mother-child relationship as you can get. Mike Nichols and Elaine May created perfectly improvised scenes that were outrageously funny, yet simply understated. Their dry wit and wry satire allowed them to lampoon faceless bureaucracy and such previously sacrosanct institutions as hospitals, politics, funeral homes, and even motherhood. Like other great comedy duos, Nichols and May perfectly complemented each other. They seemed so attuned and at ease with each other that the mis-communication they often based their skits on were all the funnier. Within a short while of arriving in New York, they were the talk of the town, appearing on The Steve Allen Show, introducing a nationwide audience to a humor unlike any on television. Nichols and May spent much of the next three years traveling the country performing together on stage, radio, and television. In 1960, "An Evening with Mike Nichols and Elaine May" had opened on Broadway to rave reviews, but by 1961, Nichols and May would announce the end of their partnership. Interested in pursuing individual careers, the two left behind one of the most popular and imitated comedy acts of its time. Mike Nichols has directed and produced a variety of hit films, such as The Graduate, Silkwood, The Birdcage, Primary Colors, and The Remains of the Day. Elaine May is a two-time Academy Award nominated director, screenwriter, and actress.
Tags: mike  nichols  elaine  may  improvisational  comedy 
Added: 6th November 2007
Views: 3717
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2756
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Posted By: Lava1964
Alfred Mosher Butts Inventor of Scrabble One of my heroes! In 1948 Alfred Mosher Butts, an unemployed architect, invented the greatest word game in the history of the world: Scrabble Brand Crossword Game. He named it Criss-Cross Words and didn't make much money from it. He sold the rights to a family called the Brunots who renamed the game Scrabble and marketed it from their home. It got plenty of rave reviews in the early 1950s. Demand for Scrabble became so great that the Brunots could not keep pace with the orders. They in turn sold the rights to Scrabble to a manufacturer. Over the years Scrabble's ownership has passed through several companies. Hasbro presently owns the North American trademark name of Scrabble. Each year millions of games are sold and hundreds of tournaments are held under the aegis of the National Scrabble Association. (Yours truly is an expert ranked player who directs an official NSA club in Canada. I can often be spotted officiating major Scrabble events. Look for me at the 2008 U.S. Nationals in Orlando in July!)
Tags: Scrabble  Alfred  Butts 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 2257
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Hollywood Ten 60 Years Ago Today The Hollywood blacklist, was the mid-20th Century list of screenwriters, actors, directors, musicians, and other U.S. entertainment professionals who were denied employment in the field because of their political beliefs or associations, real or suspected. Artists were barred from work on the basis of their alleged membership in or sympathy toward the American Communist Party, involvement in liberal or simply humanitarian political causes that enforcers of the blacklist associated with communism, and/or refusal to assist federal investigations into Communist Party activities. Some were blacklisted merely because their names came up at the wrong place and time. Even during the period of its strictest enforcement, the late 1940s through the late 1950s, the blacklist was rarely made explicit and verifiable, but it caused direct damage to the careers of scores of American artists, often made betrayal of friendship, not to mention principle, the price for a livelihood, and promoted ideological censorship across the entire industry. Pictured are Front row (from left): Herbert Biberman, attorneys Martin Popper and Robert W. Kenny, Albert Maltz, Lester Cole. Middle row: writer Dalton Trumbo, John Howard Lawson, Alvah Bessie, Samuel Ornitz. Back row: Ring Lardner Jr., Edward Dmytryk, Adrian Scott.
Tags: the  hollywood  ten  blacklist  mccarthy  hearings 
Added: 25th November 2007
Views: 2213
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Posted By: Sophia
 Baby Face Nelson Lester Gillis, better known as Baby Face Nelson, due to his youthful appearance, was a diminutive 5'4" tall bank robber in the 1930s. Born in Chicago, he began his criminal career stealing cars. He also worked for a time as an enforcer for Al Capone, fought with Capone's ally and outfit member Anthony Accetturo, and received broken bones for his troubles, but he was let go due to being "too violent" for Capone to control. Nelson came to greater prominence in 1934, when he joined the Dillinger gang. He was the antithesis of popular, Robin Hood-like gangsters of the Depression era. Having a psychopathic bent, he didn't hesitate to kill lawmen and innocent bystanders. In contrast though, Nelson was a devoted husband and father who often had his wife and children with him while running from the law. A running machine gun battle with FBI agents took place on November 27, 1934. It started when Nelson, his wife, and John Paul Chase were driving down a road and saw a police car driving the opposite direction. Nelson hated police and federal agents and used a list of license plates he had compiled to actively hunt them at every opportunity. He had recognized the car and decided to chase them. Once they both stopped, the shootout started. Nelson and Chase used their car for cover, however, he charged at the police and opened fire. Even though he was shot 17 times, he was still able to steal the agents car after killing them. Nelson's wife and Chase helped him into the car and with Nelson giving directions, Chase drove away from the scene. Nelson succumbed to his wounds at approximately 8pm that evening and was unceremoniously dumped near a Skokie, Illinois, cemetery. He holds the dubious distinction of being personally responsible for the killing of more federal agents than any other criminal.
Tags: baby  face  nelson  al  capone  american  gangsters 
Added: 27th November 2007
Views: 2702
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Posted By: Babs64
The 3 Stooges 1933 pic guy on the right famous director From the left Moe,Larry'Curly Yup Check out there hair. Wild Pic.
Tags: Gooden 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1822
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Posted By: Marty6697
Jim Marshall Football Blooper In a 1964 Vikings-49ers game, Jim Marshall of Minnesota recovers a San Francisco fumble and takes off on a memorable run--in the wrong direction. The result was two points for the 49ers. (The Vikings won 27-22 anyway.)
Tags: Jim  Marshall  safety 
Added: 9th December 2007
Views: 7356
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Posted By: Lava1964
Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas Here's another wonderful performance by Judy Garland that brings back alot of memories, and some tears as well. It's from the 1944 film, Meet Me in St Louis. It tells the story of four sisters living in St. Louis at the time of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition World's Fair in 1904. Judy met her future husband while making this film, he was the director, Vincent Minnelli. In 2005, Time.com named Meet Me in St Louis as one of the 100 best movies of the last 80 years.
Tags: have  yourself  a  merry  liittle  christmas  judy  garland  meet  me  in  st  louis  musicals 
Added: 9th December 2007
Views: 2443
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Posted By: Naomi
Coleco Electric Football Ad 1971 A school chum of mine had this game. It was very disappointing. The electric vibrations would send the players scattering in all directions. You really couldn't play it.
Tags: Coleco  Electric  Football  commercial 
Added: 16th December 2007
Views: 2499
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Posted By: Lava1964

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