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Andrew Shaw Disallowed Headbutt Goal From Game #2 of the 2015 NHL Western Conference finals, Andrew Shaw of the Chicago Blackhawks 'scores' an overtime goal against the Anaheim Ducks with a creative soccer-style header. It was a play that few fans had ever seen before--and many wondered if it was a legal way to score a goal. It's not. By rule a goal cannot be scored if the puck is deliberately directed into the net with anything other than a player's stick. The goal was properly disallowed. However, many fans think the rules ought to be amended to allow such a play to count as a legitimate goal. Chicago won the game with a goal that actually counted in the third overtime period. This clip is from Hockey Night in Canada's coverage of the game.
Tags: Andrew  Shaw  NHL  disallowed  goal  header 
Added: 20th May 2015
Views: 1079
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Mickey Rooney as Mr Yunioshi In the 1961 romantic comedy Breakfast at Tiffany's, Audrey Hepburn played flighty New York City escort Holly Golightly. The relatively small role of her Japanese landlord, Mr. Yunioshi, was strangely played by...Mickey Rooney. Director Blake Edwards instructed Rooney to play Yunioshi as a caricature of an Asian. Accordingly Rooney wore false dentures to give him protruding front teeth. He also spoke in a way that the letter L came out as an R sound. ('Miss Go-right-ry' was how he pronounced the main character's name.) Most of the time Mr. Yunioshi yelled rather than spoke. Based on 21st-century political correctness, Rooney's performance clearly falls within the bounds of bad taste, but as Rooney noted shortly before he died, for the first 40 years after Breakfast at Tiffany's was released, nobody complained. In fact, Rooney claimed that Asian fans of the film always thought his portrayal of Mr. Yunioshi was very amusing.
Tags: Mickey  Rooney  Mr  Yunioshi  Breakfast  at  Tiffanys 
Added: 20th June 2015
Views: 975
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Thats My Mama - Failed Sitcom ABC had high hopes for the sitcom That's My Mama when it debuted in the fall of 1974. This clip shows the bland opening credits from the first season. The sitcom was set in a middle-class black section of Washington, D.C. It featured Clifton Davis as Clifton Curtis, a youthful barber who was the proprietor of a shop he inherited from his late father. Theresa Merritt played his widowed mother, Eloise. Slotted on Wednesday nights directly against against NBC's Little House on the Prairie, the sitcom failed to crack the Nielsen top 30 at any time during its first season and was nearly axed. Still thinking it had potential, ABC kept it on for part of a second season. When ratings did not improve, That's My Mama was terminated after its 39th episode aired on December 17, 1975--although a rerun was shown the following week. The sitcom did, however, launch the career of Ted Lange, who played the roll of Clifton's flamboyant friend, Junior. Lange went on to bigger and better things as bartender Isaac Washington on The Love Boat.
Tags: Thats  My  Mama  Clifton  Davis  Theresa  Merritt  Ted  Lange  ABC  sitcom 
Added: 3rd November 2015
Views: 817
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Final Scene from The Big Parade - 1925 One of film history's largely forgotten masterpieces is The Big Parade (1925). Directed by King Vidor, the movie stars John Gilbert as James (Jim) Apperson, the pampered son of an American industrialist who, while watching a military procession, is persuaded by his patriotic friends to enlist in the US Army to fight in the First World War. The main female character, Melisande, a French farm girl, is played by Renee Adoree. The plot has Jim's unit being billeted on the grounds of Melisande's farm and the two falling in love--despite the language barrier and Jim being engaged to a girl back home named Justyn. The two lovers are separated as Jim's unit is called to the front. Jim is wounded in the leg. While recuperating in a hospital, Jim learns that Melisande's farm has changed hands several times and that Melisande and her mother are among hundreds of refugees who have fled their homes. Just before Jim returns stateside as an amputee, his mother discovers that Justyn has fallen in love with Jim's brother. Accordingly, Jim's mother urges him to return to France to look for Melisande. Here is the climactic scene when Jimmy and Melisande reunite.
Tags: The  Big  Parade  John  Gilbert  Renee  Adoree  1925  final  scene  silent  film 
Added: 12th June 2017
Views: 562
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Rarest Canadian Coin - 1936 Dot Cent The rarest and most desirable coin in Canadian history is the "1936 dot" one-cent coin. Only three are known to exist. Why were they struck? On January 20, 1936, King George V died shortly after his 71st birthday. As is customary with Canadian coinage, if a monarch dies anytime during a year, his/her portrait remains on all the coins minted in that year. George V was succeeded on the throne by his eldest son, Edward VIII. Anyone with even passing knowledge of the history of the British royal family ought to know that Edward VIII abdicated late in 1936 in order to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. He was succeeded by his younger brother, who became George VI. This presented a problem for the Royal Canadian Mint. It had already prepared dies for its 1937 coins with the likeness of Edward VIII, which were now outdated and useless. It was feared that the new dies with George VI's head would not be ready for striking in 1937. The mint conceived a backup plan: They would reissue the 1936 coins bearing George V's likeness, but place a dot below the 1936 date to indicate they were made during the 1937 mintage year. Only three samples of the one-cent coin bearing the distinctive dot were struck--and all three were kept by the director of the mint. As it turned out, the dies for 1937 with George VI's head were ready in time for 1937 strikes, so the 1936 dot coins were not needed. One of the three rare coins sold at auction in 2013 for about $250,000 U.S.
Tags: 1936  dot  Canadian  cent  rare  numismatics 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 809
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 751
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Mr Barnsdahl Fans of The Lucy Show immediately think of Mr. Mooney (played by Gale Gordon) as the tight-fisted banker with whom Lucy Carmichael constantly clashed. However, Mr. Mooney was a second-season replacement for Mr. Barnsdahl, played by Charles Lane. Lane was a longtime character actor who specialized in playing officious, unlikable authority figures. A familiar face for generations of TV and movie fans, Lane's acting career began in 1929. Four years later he was a founding member of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG). He was a favorite of director Frank Capra and became a good friend of Lucille Ball. He had roles in several episodes of I Love Lucy. (He was a fellow expectant father in the 1953 episode when Little Ricky is born.) When Lucy's second sitcom series, The Lucy Show, began in the fall of 1962, she played a widow who lived off a trust fund left to her by her late husband. Lane played Mr. Barnsdahl, the humorless, no-nonsense banker who managed the fund. Lane appeared in just four episodes, however. According to one book about Lucille Ball's sitcoms, Lane had difficulty remembering his lines when performing in front of a live audience and happily stepped aside for Gordon. (Shortly thereafter Lane was cast as heartless railroad official Homer Bedloe on Petticoat Junction--which was not shot in front of a live audience.) Another explanation for Lane's departure is that he was only an interim character until Gale Gordon--Lucy's first choice to play her banker--was freed from other contractual obligations and could become the miserly Mr. Mooney whom every Lucy fan remembers. Lane lived to be a centenarian, dying at age 102 in 2007. His last acting credit was as a narrator at age 101. He was the oldest SAG member at the time of his death.
Tags: Charles  Lane  Lucy  Show  Mr  Barnsdahl 
Added: 4th April 2018
Views: 455
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Partridge Family - My Heart Belongs To A Two-Car Garage (Debbie Sims Version) with Arte Johnson P1 Written by William S. Bickley Produced by Larry Rosen Directed by Jerry London Original Air Date: February 4, 1972 The Partridge family awakes one morning to find they have an unexpected visitor: Russian immigrant Nicholas Minsky Pushkin, or, as he is otherwise know, Pushkin the Magnificent. Nicholas is a jack-of-all-trades: master chef, master carpenter, master artist, etc. Nicholas has decided to offer his services to a typical middle-class American family and the Partridges are that lucky family. The family likes Nicholas well enough but he seems to break as many things as he fixes. In his sincere desire to be helpful, Nicholas paints the garage door while the Partridges are away on a concert date. It may sound innocent, but Pushkin the Magnificent has painted a scantily-clad young lady on the garage door and although Nicholas is an accomplished artist, the location of the work is a cause for much embarrassment, and the neighbors are in an uproar. As it turns out, Nicholas may not be the greatest of carpenters, but he is a recognized artist. The local museum purchases the garage door for a large sum so Shirley is able to buy a new garage door and Pushkin is able to take a vacation with the remaining money. Song: "Last Night," music and lyrics by Wes Farrell & Tony Romeo (on Shopping Bag)
Tags: The  Partridge  Family 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 304
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace
The Partridge Family - My Heart Belongs To A Two-Car Garage (Debbie Sims Version) with Arte Johnson P2 Written by William S. Bickley Produced by Larry Rosen Directed by Jerry London Original Air Date: February 4, 1972 The Partridge family awakes one morning to find they have an unexpected visitor: Russian immigrant Nicholas Minsky Pushkin, or, as he is otherwise know, Pushkin the Magnificent. Nicholas is a jack-of-all-trades: master chef, master carpenter, master artist, etc. Nicholas has decided to offer his services to a typical middle-class American family and the Partridges are that lucky family. The family likes Nicholas well enough but he seems to break as many things as he fixes. In his sincere desire to be helpful, Nicholas paints the garage door while the Partridges are away on a concert date. It may sound innocent, but Pushkin the Magnificent has painted a scantily-clad young lady on the garage door and although Nicholas is an accomplished artist, the location of the work is a cause for much embarrassment, and the neighbors are in an uproar. As it turns out, Nicholas may not be the greatest of carpenters, but he is a recognized artist. The local museum purchases the garage door for a large sum so Shirley is able to buy a new garage door and Pushkin is able to take a vacation with the remaining money. Song: "Last Night," music and lyrics by Wes Farrell & Tony Romeo (on Shopping Bag) Category
Tags: The  Partridge  Family,  70s 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 347
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace

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