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ET Diary An E.T. diary, 1982. The Spielberg film was one of the decade's first big blockbusters, and naturally it spawned a whole host of merchandise. The diary is, these days, one of the more difficult to find.
Tags: ET  Diary 
Added: 2nd July 2007
Views: 1831
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Posted By: BKV
Lindbergh Kidnapping Case 1932 One of the most famous criminal cases in American history was the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh, Jr., son of the famous aviator. On March 1, 1932, sometime between 8 and 10 p.m., the toddler was snatched from his upstairs nursery at the Lindberghs' still-under-construction retreat home near Hopewell, New Jersey. A note in badly written English was found on the window sill. It demanded $50,000 in ransom for the safe return of the child. A crude homemade ladder was also found leaning against the house. There were few other clues. The case took an odd turn when a 72-year-old good samaritan named John F. Condon took out a newspaper ad volunteering to act as an intermediary to negotiate with the kidnappers. His offer was accepted but neither Lindbergh nor Condon immediately informed the police for fear of putting the child's life in danger. Eventually the money--much of it in rare gold certificates--was paid to a man in a cemetery but the child was not returned. Shortly afterward a child's body was found in a wooded area not far from the Lindbergh home. It was badly decomposed and was identified as the Lindbergh child based on a slight deformity on its right foot. The child had died from a severe skull fracture. Eventually Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German immigrant with a criminal record in his homeland, was tracked down for spending one of the gold certificates at a gas station. About $15,000 in ransom money was found in his house. Planks from his garage matched the wood used to make the crude ladder. Hauptmann proclaimed his innocence, claiming he was only holding the money for a man named Isador Fisch who had returned to Germany and died there. Hauptmann said he only began spending the money after learning of Fisch's death. Hauptmann was tried, found guilty, and executed in 1936. There is little doubt that Hauptmann was somehow connected with the kidnapping, but there are lingering suspicions that he was assisted by someone who knew the routine and the goings-on at the Lindbergh household. The Lindberghs were not even supposed to be at their Hopewell home on the night of the kidnapping. The kidnapper(s) also had to know precisely when and where the boy would be left unattended.
Tags: Lindbergh  kidnapping 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1440
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Posted By: Lava1964
RAINY NIGHT IN GEORGIA Brook Benton In 1969, after several years without a major hit, Brook Benton signed to a new record label, Cotillion Records, a subsidiary of Atlantic Records. Brought to the attention of producer Jerry Wexler, Benton recorded this song. Taken from his come-back album, 'Brook Benton Today', the melancholy song became an instant hit. In the spring of 1970, it topped the Billboard Magazine Black Singles chart. It also reached #4 on the Pop Singles and #2 on the Adult Contemporary charts, respectively. It was also #498 on the List of Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. This performance was taped live in 1982.
Tags: brook  benton  rainy  night  in  georgia 
Added: 27th December 2007
Views: 1374
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Posted By: Naomi
Farrahs Story airs tonight Friday, May 15 from 9-11 PM ET, NBC News will introduce viewers to the Farrah Fawcett who is a fighter, when it broadcasts "Farrah's Story," an extremely personal look at her battle with cancer. Shot with her own home video recorder, "Farrah's Story" chronicles the actress' two and half year battle with cancer. Intensely intimate and emotional, the footage becomes Farrah's video diary in which she not only shares her thoughts and feelings but also her treatments in the U.S. and Germany. This is Farrah Fawcett's story in her own words as she explains her battle and her journey with cancer, and it is her narration that tells this story.
Tags: Farrah    Fawcett    Charlie's    Angels  Farahs  Story  NBC  Special  Cancer  Colon    70's    icon    Wella    Shampoo    Lee    Majors    The    Burning    Bed    Extremities     
Added: 15th May 2009
Views: 1157
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Posted By: Steve
Death Wish Movies Death Wish was a 1974 movie loosely based on a 1972 novel by Brian Garfield. The plot focuses on the relentless vigilantism of a seemingly mild-mannered architecht Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson), a Korean War veteran. Kersey methodically pursues the band of criminals who raped and killed his wife during a home invasion. (Kersey's married daughter is also raped and suffers permanent psychological damage.) The film was notweorthy for its disturbing realism in the home-invasion scene and the ruthlessness in which Kersey stalks and mercilessly kills the culprits. The film received mixed to extremely negative reviews upon its release due to its support of vigilantism, but it had an impact on U.S. audiences. People were known to loudly cheer widely during the revenge-killing scenes. The movie did especially well at the box office in violence-plagued urban areas. Four sequels were made in the next two decades. Not surprisingly, the Death Wish films caused widespread debate over how to deal with rampant urban crime. Many critics were displeased with the film. One declared it to be an "immoral threat to society" and an encouragement of antisocial behavior. Vincent Canby of the New York Times was one of the most outspoken writers, condemning Death Wish in two extensive articles. Author Brian Garfield was also unhappy with the how the film varied greatly from his book. He called the film 'incendiary', and stated that each of the following sequels are all pointless and rancid, since they all advocate vigilantism unlike his two novels which are the exact opposite. Bronson defended the film: He felt it was intended to be a commentary on violence and was meant to attack violence, not romanticize it. Over time many critics began to warm to the original film more than the four sequels, which were more exploitative and contrived.
Tags: Death  Wish  movies  Charles  Bronson  vigilantism   
Added: 16th May 2012
Views: 909
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Posted By: Lava1964

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