Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Special Beevis and Butthead Do radio Head Classic MTV
Tags: Gooden 
Added: 13th June 2010
Views: 1277
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Jimmy Dean R.I.P. Jimmy Dean
Tags: Great  Country  singer  Good  Sausage! 
Added: 14th June 2010
Views: 1180
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Rare Earth Classic 1973 These boys had some Soul!!
Tags: Gooden 
Added: 14th June 2010
Views: 2194
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Bewitched Bothered and Bewildered Doris Day what a beautiful voice!
Tags: Gooden! 
Added: 14th June 2010
Views: 2328
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Frijid Sing A Song For Freedom. The Lively Spot Show 1971.
Tags: Old  Forgotten  Band  Gooden 
Added: 14th June 2010
Views: 1335
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Cynthia Lynn Lovely Cynthia Lynn (pictured here in a CBS publicity photo with Bob Crane) played Fraulein Helga, Colonel Klink's secretary, in the first season of Hogan's Heroes (1965-66). In the series' pilot episode, Helga unabashedly works with the prisoners to sabotage the German war effort. In the first season however, Helga only assists Hogan and his cronies with small favors usually paid for with bribes of luxury items. The next season, Lynn was suddenly replaced by Klink's new secretary, Fraulein Hilda, played by Sigrid Valdis (who later became Bob Crane's second wife!). Why was Lynn replaced? No one has ever satisfactorily answered that question for Hogan's Heroes buffs. One persistent rumor had Lynn engaging in an off-screen affair with the married Crane. When the romance became known, Lynn quit the show. Lynn did return a few times late in the show's run in bit parts.
Tags: Cynthia  Lynn  Hogans  Heroes  Helga 
Added: 15th June 2010
Views: 4437
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Carnegie Libraries Andrew Carnegie made a vast fortune in the steel industry. His philosophy was that a man should spend half his life acquiring wealth and the other half using it for good works. Accordingly, Carnegie financed the building of the astonishing total of 2,509 public libraries in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. Carnegie's passion for libraries began at a young age. He saw the value of public libraries as places for learning and community centers. Cities or towns that wanted a Carnegie Library had to provide the building site and maintain the library after it was built. Carnegie's money paid for everything else. A carnegie library always had to have 'open stacks' so the public could browse, and it had to provide free service. Carnegie's foundation built libraries from 1885 to 1929. (Carnegie himself died in 1919 at age 84.) Many of these libraries are still in use today, such as the one pictured here in Grass Valley, California.
Tags: Andrew  Carnegie  libraries  philanthropy 
Added: 18th June 2010
Views: 1186
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1960s Paper Dresses Sixties Ford fashion model Colleen Corby models a paper dress on the cover of the May 1967 Seventeen magazine. More Colleen and sixties teen fashions can be seen at my site corbyfansDOTmultiplyDOTcom. Everyone is welcome to this visit down memory lane!
Tags: sixties  fashions 
Added: 18th June 2010
Views: 2646
Rating:
Posted By: AngoraSox
1960s model Colleen Corby Popular sixties teen fashion model Colleen Corby on the cover of a September 1964 Seventeen magazine. More vintage Seventeen magazines and more of Colleen Corby at my fansite corbyfansDOTmultiplyDOTcom All nostalgia seekers welcome!
Tags: 1960s  fashions 
Added: 18th June 2010
Views: 2697
Rating:
Posted By: AngoraSox
Cigar Store Indians Cigar store Indians (or wooden Indians) were used by tobacconists as garish advertising figures. At one point in the late nineteenth century, the cigar store Indian was a tobacco icon much like striped poles were for barber shops or three gold balls were for pawn shops. The figures were often three-dimensional wooden sculptures several feet tall; some were life-sized. They were first utilized because of the general illiteracy of the populace. American Indians and tobacco had always been associated. Since Indians had introduced tobacco to Europeans, the depiction of native people on smoke-shop signs was inevitable. As early as the seventeenth century, European tobacconists used figures of American Indians to advertise their shops. The statues began to lose their prominence in twentieth century America largely because cities began restricting the presence of intrusive objects on public sidewalks. Most surviving figures are museum pieces and collectors' items.
Tags: cigar  store  Indian 
Added: 20th June 2010
Views: 1929
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 372 373 374 375 376 377 [378] 379 380 381 382 383 384 of 531 | Random