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Was Butch Cassidy Really Killed In a scene immortalized by Hollywood in the 1969 film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (played by Paul Newman and Robert Redford), the two outlaws run into a hail of bullets after being cornered by Bolivian troops sometime around 1908. There have always been doubters as to the truth of the twosome's supposed violent end. No solid proof of such a shootout has ever been obtained. Instead, Cassidy is said to have fled to France where he had surgery on his face before sneaking back into the U.S. Furthermore, according to the same account, he lived out his final days quietly and anonymously in Washington State – and wrote an autobiography which he disguised as a biography. In 2011, American rare book expert Brent Ashworth and author Larry Pointer obtained a 200-page manuscript from 1934 called Bandit Invincible: The Story of Butch Cassidy written by a William T. Phillips which they claim was actually written by Cassidy. They claim the book is Cassidy’s own story of his life as an outlaw. It describes how after surviving the shootout in Bolivia he went to Paris and had his face altered then went back to the U.S. and reunited with an old girlfriend, Gertrude Livesay. The authors say they married in Michigan in 1908 and moved to Spokane in Washington state in 1911. He apparently died in 1937, aged 71. One of Cassidy's 12 siblings claimed she saw Butch alive and well in 1924.
Tags: Butch  Cassisdy  death  survival 
Added: 3rd January 2014
Views: 1214
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bob Atcher and Churn Fresh Meadow Gold Remember Bob Atcher? Bob Atcher was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, and learned violin and guitar from his father, who was skillful at playing the fiddle. Bob attended Kentucky State University when he was only 14. He studied medicine and combined that with guitar playing and yodeling. He started out on radio in Louisville on WHAS. In 1939 he was offered a regular gig on Chicago station WBBM which was broadcast nationally by CBS. The show made him a national star, and he signed with ARC just before CBS bought the company. After the purchase Atcher was transferred to Okeh Records and then to Columbia Records, both CBS subsidiaries. Between 1939 and 1942, he recorded many duets with Loretta Applegate, who went by the stage name Bonnie Blue Eyes. Atcher fought in the Army in World War II and returned to performing in 1946. In 1948 Atcher signed on with WLS and became a performer on their National Barn Dance. As one of their biggest stars, he continued to chart national hits. In 1950, he signed with Capitol Records, and later in the 1950s moved to Kapp Records. He continued with the Barn Dance well into the 1960s, and re-signed to Columbia that decade, re-recording many of his songs in stereo. Atcher, like Gene Autry, was a shrewd businessman, and bought several businesses and invested in banking with the proceeds from his career. He was also the mayor of Schaumburg, Illinois from 1959 to 1979. He died in 1993.
Tags: Atcher  Schaumburg 
Added: 18th January 2012
Views: 2074
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Posted By: KrazyKasper
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5549
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Posted By: Lava1964
Buth Ruth Final Public Appearance According to a popular myth (perpetuated by New York Yankees fans), Babe Ruth's final appearance at a ballpark was in Yankee Stadium on Babe Ruth Day on June 13, 1948 where the terminally ill Bambino put on the pinstripes one last time and addressed a huge, subdued crowd in a croaky, cancer-ravaged voice. It makes for a fitting end to Babe Ruth's days as a public figure, but it wasn't so. Ruth's final public appearance actually occurred six days later at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis when the lowly Browns hosted the Yankees in a Saturday game. The ailing Ruth failed to create much excitement that day: The paid attendance was under 6,000. Ruth made a short, raspy speech and posed for this photo flanked by kids who had descended from the ballpark's grandstand. Ruth died two months later, on August 16, 1948. He was 53.
Tags: baseball  Babe  Ruth  Yankees  myth 
Added: 13th May 2012
Views: 4051
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dagmar - First Late-Night TV Star Anyone remember Dagmar? Dagmar Lewis (born Virginia Ruth in 1921) was an American actress, model and television personality of the 1950s. As a statuesque, busty blonde, she became the first major female star of television, receiving much press coverage during that decade. After her marriage to Angelo Lewis in 1941, she moved to New York where he was a naval officer. She adopted Jennie Lewis as her stage name (taken from her married name, Virginia Lewis). To keep busy, she became a fashion photographer's model--which got the buxom blonde noticed. Although she had no show business experience, she was cast in a Broadway musical revue, Laffing Room Only. In 1950, Lewis was hired by Jerry Lester as his sidekick for NBC's first late-night TV show: Broadway Open House (1950–52), the forerunner to The Tonight Show. Lester renamed her Dagmar. Billed as "a girl singer," she was instructed to wear a low-cut gown, sit on a stool, and play the role of a stereotypical dumb blonde. No one remembers her ever singing on the show. With tight sweaters displaying her curvy 5'8" figure (measuring 42"-23"-39"), her dim-bulb character was an immediate success, and the show emerged as a surprise hit for NBC. Dagmar soon attracted much more attention than Lester and showed that she was both bright and quick-witted when she appeared in sketches. Lester enjoyed making occasional jokes about her "hidden talents." Her personal appearances created a sensation, leading to much press coverage and a salary increase from $75 to $1,250 per week. With Dagmar getting all the attention, Lester walked off his own show in May 1951, and Dagmar carried on as the program's sole host. On July 16, 1951, she was featured on the cover of Life Magazine. However, Broadway Open House came to an end one month later. Undaunted, Dagmar became one of the leading personalities of early 1950s live television, doing sketch comedy on Milton Berle's Texaco Star Theater, The Bob Hope Show, and several other programs. In 1952, she hosted Dagmar's Canteen, a 15-minute program that aired at 12:15 a.m. on Saturday nights. She sang, danced, interviewed servicemen, and performed comedy, but the show was cancelled after just 12 weeks. She died a month before her 80th birthday in 2001.
Tags: Dagmar  bimbo  blonde  TV  starlet 
Added: 17th June 2012
Views: 7522
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Protocol Gaffe - Korean Flag Error When play began at the Olympic women's soccer tourney on July 25, 2012 a major protocol error gummed up the works: North Korea's women's soccer team refused to take the field for its first Olympics match after an enormous diplomatic faux pax. The flag of their neighbor and ideological enemy South Korea was displayed alongside the players' names on the scoreboard at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland instead of the North Korean flag. North Korea eventually played its match against Colombia, winning 2-0, but only after receiving permission from the office of Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un. The diplomatic kerfuffle began after team officials ordered the players back to their locker room, delaying the start of the game for more than an hour. They informed Olympic staff that no further action would be taken until guidance had been sought from North Korea's national soccer federation. That federation is officially headed by Kim Jong-un, the son of recently deceased leader Kim Jong-il. The level of control exerted by the North Korean government over every aspect of life in the country means that all major sporting decisions must be approved by the leadership. North Korea and South Korea are technically still at war. The "peace" to end the Korean War in 1953 is only an armistice--not an actual peace treaty. Organizers profusely apologized for the "human error." The mistake came, ironically, only a few days after British Olympic organizers guaranteed there would be no errors with flags, national anthems, and other areas of international protocol during the 2012 Games.
Tags: flag  error  Olympics  North  Korea 
Added: 27th July 2012
Views: 1547
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Posted By: Lava1964
Wrestlemania III Hulk Hogan VS Andre The Giant March 29 1987 Wrestlemania 3 Hulk Hogan VS Andre The Giant March 29, 1987. WrestleMania III was the third annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). The event was held on March 29, 1987 at the Pontiac Silverdome in Pontiac, Michigan. The event is particularly notable for the record attendance of 93,173, the largest recorded attendance for a live indoor sporting event in North America. The event is considered to be the pinnacle of the 1980s wrestling boom. The record itself stood until February 14, 2010 when the 2010 NBA All-Star Game broke the indoor sporting event record with an attendance of 108,713 at Cowboys Stadium. The WWF generated $1.6 million in ticket sales. Almost one million fans watched the event at 160 closed circuit locations in North America. The number of people watching via pay-per-view was estimated at several million, and pay-per-view revenues were estimated at $10 million.
Tags: Wrestlemania  3  Hulk  Hogan  VS  Andre  The  Giant  March  29  1987 
Added: 18th August 2012
Views: 2041
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Posted By: masonx31
1973 Wimbledon Boycott In May 1973 Nikola (Niki) Pilic, Yugoslavia's number-one-ranked male tennis player, was suspended by his national tennis association. The governing body claimed he had refused to play in a Davis Cup tie for Yugoslavia against New Zealand earlier that month. Today tennis players routinely turn down invitations to play for their countries in Davis Cup competition, but back in 1973 it was considered a big no-no--especially in an eastern European country. Pilic denied he had done so. Be that as it may, Pilic was initially suspended for nine months. Yugoslavia's suspension was supported by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF), but it was later reduced to just one month. Nevertheless, that month happened to be when the prestigious Wimbledon championships took place. Thus, Pilic would not be permitted to play at Wimbledon. The recently formed men's players union, the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), stated that if Pilic was not allowed to compete, none of its membership should compete. As a result, 81 of the top players, including reigning champion Stan Smith, boycotted Wimbledon in 1973 to protest Pilic's suspension. The initial seeding for the men's draw had already taken place. Thirteen of the 16 men's seeds withdrew. This resulted in an enormous number of qualifiers and lucky losers getting into the main draw. Three leading ATP players, Ilie Nastase, Roger Taylor and Ray Keldie, defied the boycott and were fined by the ATP's disciplinary committee. Also among those who chose to play were two rising stars: Bjorn Borg and Jimmy Connors, who each advanced to the quarterfinals. Despite the boycott, the attendance of 300,172 was the second highest in Wimbledon's history at that time. The eventual men's champion was Jan Kodes of Czechoslovakia. He defeated Alex Metreveli of the Soviet Union 6-1, 9-8, 6-3 in the final. (Tiebreakers were played at 8-8 in those days.) Kodes is shown here planting a kiss on the championship trophy.
Tags: tennis  Wimbledon  boycott 
Added: 15th September 2012
Views: 3344
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Posted By: Lava1964
Waldos Last Stand - 1940 This is a colorized version (boo!) of the 1940 Our Gang comedy Waldo's Last Stand. In this one, the gang tries to increase the business at Waldo's struggling lemonade stand by putting on a floor show! This episode marked the final appearance of Waldo and the first appearance of Froggy. In the final number, one of the dancers is five-year-old Janet Burston, the girl who would replace Darla Hood as the lead female gang member until the series ran its course.
Tags: Our  Gang  colorized  Waldos  Last  Stand 
Added: 12th October 2012
Views: 2620
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Posted By: Lava1964
Johnny Carson Dances with Ginger Rogers From a 1976 episode of The Tonight Show, Johnny Carson, at the insistence of Hollywood legend Ginger Rogers, tries a few dance steps with her. Rogers was approaching 65 at the time. She looks spectacular!
Tags: Johnny  Carson  Ginger  Rogers  Tonight  Show 
Added: 10th December 2012
Views: 2266
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Posted By: Lava1964

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