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Final Ed Sullivan Show - 1971 The Ed Sullivan Show (called The Toast of the Town until 1955) debuted on CBS on June 20, 1948. The first season it aired live on Sundays from 9 to 10 p.m. For the next 22 years it aired on Sundays from 8 to 9 p.m. and became a television staple and a cultural institution. Fondly remembered, The Ed Sullivan Show is arguably the most important entertainment program in television history as it showcased the world's best singers, dancers, actors, musicians, magicians, circus acts, and comedians. (Many classic Broadway performances exist today solely because they were preserved on The Ed Sullivan Show.) Despite Ed's obvious shortcomings as a television host--he was extremely "wooden" as an emcee--the appeal of the show was that it provided something for everybody. One critic aptly declared, "Ed Sullivan can't sing, dance or tell jokes--but he knows who can!" By 1971 The Ed Sullivan Show was in decline, however. Ratings were still generally good, but the all-important demographics showed that younger viewers were no longer watching in sizable numbers. Accordingly CBS unceremoniously applied the ax. The last live show aired on Sunday, March 28, 1971. The performers on that final Sunday were folk singer Melanie; singing duo Tony Sandler & Ralph Young; Danny Davis & the Nashville Brass; mezzo-soprano Joanna Simon; impressionist David Frye; comedian Joey Adams; comedy duo Norman Wisdom and Tony Fane; comedian Lennie Schultz; and sleight-of-hand artist Vic Perry. Sullivan, who hoped to extend his show to at least 25 seasons, had no inkling the March 28, 1971 broadcast would be the last show, so there was no grand finale or tearful farewell. Reruns continued through June 6, 1971. The Ed Sullivan Show was replaced by the CBS Sunday Evening Movie--which lasted just one season. From all accounts, the cancellation of the show deeply affected Sullivan's health and well being. He began exhibiting signs of senility. Paul McCartney recalled encountering Sullivan about a year after the show's cancellation and Sullivan had no idea who McCartney was. Joan Rivers had a similar experience. Sullivan died on October 13, 1974--which was a Sunday--just a few months after being diagnosed with advanced esophageal cancer. He was 73 years old.
Tags: Ed  Sullivan  Show  finale  1971 
Added: 27th February 2014
Views: 2193
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dance Marathon Craze During the 1920s and 1930s, dance marathons were a popular diversion in the United States. It is estimated that at their pinnacle, dance marathons were the main source of livelihood for 20,000 frequent competitors, officials, promoters, and musicians. Rules varied from place to place, but generally a couple stayed in the running for cash prizes as long as they kept moving on the dance floor. Only short respites were allowed every few hours for meals and rests. One event in New York City in 1937 lasted 481 hours--slightly more than 20 days! By the late 1930s, several cities and states had outlawed dance marathons because of the health dangers that accompanied sleep deprivation. This colorized photo from 1925 shows a typically exhausted couple.
Tags: dance  marathons 
Added: 16th August 2009
Views: 1810
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Posted By: Lava1964
MECO - Close Encounters: Disco Theme (1977) Remember Meco? He was selling records by the truckload in the 1970s. This successful disco dance composer, American music producer Domenico Monardo made his mark in the business by creating highly popular strings of LP's and 45's; all in the middle of the 1970s with many film titles as his source of inspiration. Domenico had the opportunity working with Gloria Gaynor on an array of songs in the early 70s with a production company he had help create."Never Can Say Goodbye" was the 1st time a whole album would include non-stoppable dance beats set on a vinyl recording. Remember Donna Summer? She imitated this too. It wasn't Meco's recorded idea though. He was just a part of it at the time. He continued working with Gaynor in that time as well as briefly getting involved with Diana Ross. This time is was as a studio session musician. With the movies, turns out that he was just a fan of them like you. He was really impressed with the "Star Wars" movie soundtrack. He loved the film so much that he wanted to be a part of it. This version of John Williams "Close Encounters" theme was released in the later half of 1977 on an LP called by Meco called 'Encounters Of Every Kind,' from which the 45 single was played on AM radio for weeks after. Meco continued on with the "dance version" of movie compositions right through the early 1980s. He did among others, "Superman," "The Wizard of Oz," "Star Trek," and was especially known for getting his John Williams disco version of "Star Wars" played on radio waves worldwide. The album that sold bigger than the film soundtrack was entitled "Star Wars and Other Galactic Funk." *E*
Tags: 70s  Best  Seller  #1 
Added: 16th August 2009
Views: 1154
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Posted By: Electricland
Le Click - Tonight Is The Night Tags: Le  Click  -  Tonight  Is  The  Night  Dance    anni    90    le    click    tonight    is    the    night    la    bouche    melanie    thornton    90 
Added: 20th August 2009
Views: 1039
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Posted By: Laura
Yazoo or Yazz- Dont Go Tags: Yazoo  or  Yazz-  Dont  Go  80s  1980s  dance  punk  music  oldies 
Added: 5th September 2009
Views: 1192
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Funny Boston Bruins Promo This short promo is probably the best of the bunch produced by the Boston Bruins in 2008. It gives clear guidance that Bruins fans should not date Montreal fans.
Tags: Boston  Bruins  NHL  hockey 
Added: 27th April 2014
Views: 853
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Makin It - Failed Disco Sitcom In 1979 ABC figured the time was ripe for a disco-themed sitcom. Actually, the timing was bad. The disco fad was already on the decline, but that didn't stop ABC from giving the public nine episodes of Makin' It. The series was set in Passiac, NJ. David Naughton starred as college student Billy Manucci. Billy worked part time at Tasty Treats (an ice cream store) and spent his evenings at Inferno, Passiac's hottest disco. Ellen Travolta played the mother of Billy, an older son named Tony (who was the best dancer at Inferno), and daughter Tina. Some people have said Makin' It attempted to be a hybrid of Happy Days and Saturday Night Fever. (I think that's a fair comment. The first episode was titled Stayin' Alive. The opening credits are certainly Happy Days-like.) Here's the opening montage. Makin' It debuted on February 1, 1979 and last aired on March 23. Interestingly, the show's catchy theme song, performed by lead actor Naughton, became a hit after Makin' It had been cancelled by the network. It reached #5 on the Billboard Top 40.
Tags: Makin  It  ABC  sitcom  disco 
Added: 5th June 2014
Views: 1653
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Posted By: Lava1964
Marty (1955) - Final Scene This is the final scene from Marty, a beautifully simple film that won the Best Picture Oscar for 1955. Ernest Borgnine plays the title role of a "fat and ugly" thirty-something butcher who is seeking love to cure his loneliness. One night he meets a nondescript girl named Clara at a dance. They both like each other's company, but Marty's possessive mother dislikes her because she fears her son will marry Clara and leave her household. Marty's friends dismiss Clara as "a dog" because of her plainness. The final scene is uplifting: Marty learns to follow his heart regardless of what others think of him.
Tags: Marty  Ernest  Borgnine 
Added: 24th June 2014
Views: 3026
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Posted By: Lava1964
Laurel and Hardy meet Santana Tags: Laurel    Hardy    Santana    Oye    Como    Va    dance    funny    Way    out    West    30 
Added: 18th September 2009
Views: 1708
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Posted By: Laura
Gig Young Murder-Suicide 1978 Actor Gig Young was outwardly debonair but he led a troubled life. Alcoholism curtailed his promising acting career and ruined more than one marriage, including a turbulent wedlock with Elizabeth Montgomery. Although he won an Oscar for his 1969 portrayal of a dance marathon emcee in They Shoot Horses, Don't They?, Young's acting jobs became increasingly scarce during the 1970s. He was fired after just one day on the set of Blazing Saddles for alcohol-related problems. His last film appearance was in The Death Game where the 64-year-old Young met 21-year-old script supervisor Kim Schmidt. Schmidt became Young's fifth wife on September 27, 1978. Twenty-two days later they were both found shot to death in their Manhattan apartment. The case was ruled a murder-suicide, with Young the perpetrator. No note was found to explain the motive. Although Young's estate was valued at about $200,000, in his will he left just $10 to his only child, a 14-year-old daughter, whom Young claimed was not actually his.
Tags: Gig  Young  murder-suicide 
Added: 10th October 2009
Views: 9029
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Posted By: Lava1964

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