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Cruel To Be Kind - Nick Lowe A catchy song from the late 1970s: Nick Lowe's Cruel to be Kind. This clip is from a British program similar to American Bandstand called Top of the Pops.
Tags: Nick  Lowe  Cruel  to  Be  Kind 
Added: 28th September 2007
Views: 2302
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
James Cagney Grapefruit Scene A famous scene from an old classic: James Cagney cruelly shoves a grapefruit into the face of actress Mae Clarke in The Public Enemy (1931). Depending on which story you believe, Cagney either ad-libbed the incident or he and Clarke together decided to incorporate it into the scene. Either way, no one else in the studio expected it!
Tags: James  Cagney  grapefruit  Public  Enemy 
Added: 10th December 2007
Views: 3996
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Cher Plastic Surgery Song Spitting Image Style This is just one of the sketches taken from a show called "Spitting Image" a satirical puppet show from the UK. This show was very popular in the 80's and 90's. Cruel it may be but it wasn't as bad as some tabloids would have you believe.
Tags: Spitting  Image  UK  TV 
Added: 10th February 2008
Views: 1572
Rating:
Posted By: donmac101
Dont Be Cruel- YesterYear Tags: Dont  Be  Cruel-  YesterYear  Doo  Whop 
Added: 14th January 2009
Views: 1257
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
Gordon Lightfoot  The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" is a song written, composed, and performed by Gordon Lightfoot in commemoration of the sinking of the bulk carrier S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald on Lake Superior on November 10, 1975. It was inspired by the Newsweek article on the event, "The Cruelest Month," which appeared in the issue of November 24, 1975. The song originally appeared on Lightfoot's 1976 album, Summertime Dream, and was later released as a single. The single reached #2 on the Billboard pop charts in November 1976, making it Lightfoot's second most successful (in terms of chart position) single. 1976.
Tags: Gordon  Lightfoot    The  Wreck  of  the  Edmund  Fitzgerald 
Added: 14th April 2009
Views: 4277
Rating:
Posted By: rickfmdj
Henry Blake Killed On MASH Thirty-nine years ago today (March 18, 1975) one of the most memorable--and shocking--moments in American television was broadcast: In the final episode of the third season of MASH, Lt. Colonel Henry Blake, the commanding officer of the 4077th MASH in Korea, was killed while on his way home. McLean Stevenson had wanted to leave MASH after three seasons, so the show's writers used Stevenson's departure to make a powerful statement: some people go off to war and don't come back. Never before had a sitcom's character's death been so dramatically part of the script. Colonel Blake's death had always been part of the episode's script, but the final page had been hidden from the cast members in order to keep their reactions throughout the rest of the show true to the happy storyline of Blake returning home to his family in Bloomington, IN. Only when all the other scenes had been filmed did director Larry Gelbart inform the cast about the missing scene. This clip shows company clerk Radar O'Reilly (Gary Burghoff) interrupting an OR session to deliver the tragic news. After the show aired, CBS was inundated with hundreds of letters from viewers who were outraged that a situation comedy had become a situation tragedy. Every person who wrote a letter got a hand-written reply explaining that MASH wanted to show the cruel realities of war.
Tags: MASH  Colonel  Blake  death 
Added: 18th March 2014
Views: 2734
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Nancy Kulp-Buddy Ebsen Feud - 1984 Nancy Kulp and Buddy Ebsen starred together for nine seasons on The Beverly Hillbillies, one of the most popular sitcoms in television history. From 1962 to 1971 Kulp played prim bank secretary Miss Jane Hathaway. Ebsen played the patriarch of the oil-rich, unsophisticated Clampett clan. In 1984 Kulp, a Democrat, decided to run for Congress in her home state of Pennsylvania. She attempted to unseat popular 12-year Republican incumbent Bud Shuster in the state's 9th District. During the campaign, Kulp made an offhand remark that all the surviving cast members from The Beverly Hillbillies were supporting her. Ebsen, a lifelong Republican, wanted to set the record straight: He dispatched a note to Kulp from his California home. It read, "Hey Nancy, I love you dearly, but youíre too liberal for me. Iíve got to go with Bud Shuster." The rift between the two actors was further exacerbated when Ebsen did a radio spot for Shuster in which he reiterated his objections to Kulp's liberal politics. Kulp believed Ebsen's intrusion into Pennsylvania politics was "cruel." Embittered, she terminated their friendship. On election day Shuster soundly trounced Kulp by about a 2:1 margin. Apparently Kulp and Ebsen only reconciled shortly before Kulp's death from cancer in 1991.
Tags: Nancy  Kulp  Buddy  Ebsen  Beverly  Hillbillies  politics  feud 
Added: 18th September 2011
Views: 14984
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The New Treasure Hunt - 1974 Clip The New Treasure Hunt was a 1974-1977 syndicated remake of a 1956-1959 game show. The orginal show had a quiz segment. The 1970s version did not. Hosted by Geoff Edwards, it offered a fantastic grand prize of $25,000 to a contest who was lucky enough to choose the right box out of 30--and have the nerve to stick with it. Total Television describes the program as "slow moving and cruelly suspenseful." In this short clip from a 1974 episode, a contestant thinks she has made a bad bargain until Geoff surprises her.
Tags: New  Treasure  Hunt  Geoff  Edwards 
Added: 4th November 2012
Views: 2279
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 1822
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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