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Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II - 1953 I was surprised to discover no one had yet posted a clip of Queen Elizabeth's coronation--so I took the liberty of doing it. On February 6, 1952, George VI, the reigning monarch of the British Commonwealth, died from smoking-related health problems. He was just 56 years old. By the rules of succession, his eldest daughter, 25-year-old Elizabeth, became the new Queen. She was making a goodwill tour of Kenya when she learned she was the new British monarch. Her ceremonial coronation took more than a year to plan. It finally occurred on June 2, 1953. Here is a four-minute clip of her receiving the various symbols of power. Because coronations happen so rarely--and this is the most recent--few people realize how religious the ceremony is. (The monarch is supposed to be "the Defender of the Faith.") Recorded for posterity in spectacularly rich color, the film looks like it could have been shot yesterday--not in 1953. Because satellite broadcasting was not yet a reality, special arrangements were made for North American TV viewers to see the event as soon as possible. The undeveloped film of the ceremony was put aboard a Canadian fighter jet. A technician developed the film in a dark room while the plane was over the Atlantic. About five hours after the event occurred, the airplane landed in Canada. The freshly developed film was rushed to a CBC broadcast studio where it aired throughout Canada. American networks picked up the CBC's feed. Elizabeth II recently celebrated her 89th birthday. If she lives past the first week of September 2015, she will surpass Queen Victoria (her great-great-grandmother) as the longest-reigning monarch in British history. There's no reason to believe she won't attain that milestone. By all accounts Elizabeth II enjoys excellent health, she is still quite active, and her mother lived to be 102 years old.
Tags: coronation  Elizabeth  II  royalty 
Added: 23rd April 2015
Views: 1329
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Posted By: Lava1964
Victoria Cross Winner Joseph Kaeble The Victoria Cross is the most difficult military medal in the world to attain. To be considered for a VC, one has to be a member of a British Commonwealth country's armed forces and perform an exceptionally brave feat in the face of the enemy. Some of the heroics of Canada's 94 VC winners almost defy belief. Consider how 26-year-old Corporal Joseph Kaeble won his VC.
Tags: Joseph  Kaebel  Victoria  Cross 
Added: 12th November 2008
Views: 1397
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Posted By: Lava1964
Johnny Owen Boxing Tragedy 1980 This is a 10-minute segment of an excellent British documentary about the tragic death of Welsh boxer Johnny Owen. Owen was the British, Commonwealth, and European bantamweight champion. He was tragically killed in the ring in his attempt to win the world championship from Lupe Pintor in 1980.
Tags: Johnny  Owen  boxing  death  Wales   
Added: 23rd April 2009
Views: 1870
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Posted By: Lava1964
Victoria Cross - Valour Road The rarest and most cherished military medal in the world is the Victoria Cross. To be considered for it, one has to be a member of the British armed forces or the armed forces of a British Commonwealth country. One must perform an extraordinarily courageous act under enemy fire that is witnessed by at least one reliable observer. Then the claim has to be investigated. About 1,350 VCs have been awarded since 1856, and only 94 to Canadians (or Newfoundlanders). None are alive today. Against all odds, during the First World War, three Canadians who lived on Pine Street in Winnipeg were all awarded the VC!
Tags: Victoria  Cross  Valour  Road 
Added: 28th July 2009
Views: 1081
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boxing Day - Commonwealth Nations From Wiki: Boxing Day was traditionally a day on which the servants had a day off from their duties. Because of this the gentry would eat cold cuts and have a buffet-style feast prepared by the servants in advance. In modern times many families will still follow this tradition by eating a family-style buffet lunch, with cold cuts rather than a full cooked meal. It is a time for family, parlour games and sports in the UK. The traditional recorded celebration of Boxing Day has long included giving money and other gifts to those who were needy and in service positions. The European tradition has been dated to the Middle Ages, but the exact origin is unknown and there are some claims that it goes back to the late Roman/early Christian era; metal boxes were placed outside churches used to collect special offerings tied to the Feast of Saint Stephen. In the United Kingdom it certainly became a custom of the nineteenth century Victorians for tradesmen to collect their "Christmas boxes" or gifts in return for good and reliable service throughout the year on the day after Christmas. However, the exact etymology of the term "Boxing" is unclear, with several competing theories, none of which is definitively true. Another possibility is that the name derives from an old English tradition: in exchange for ensuring that wealthy landowners' Christmases ran smoothly, their servants were allowed to take the 26th off to visit their families. The employers gave each servant a box containing gifts and bonuses (and sometimes leftover food). In addition, around the 1800's, churches opened their alms boxes (boxes where people place monetary donations) and distributed the contents to the poor. The establishment of Boxing Day as a defined public holiday under the legislation that created the UK's Bank Holidays started the separation of 'Boxing Day' from the 'Feast of St Stephen', and today it is almost entirely a secular holiday with a tradition of shopping and post-Christmas sales starting. We invite people who celebrate this holiday to contribute to the information here.
Tags: Boxing  Day  Commonwealth  Nations 
Added: 26th December 2009
Views: 1283
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Posted By: Admin
Johnny Owen - Boxing Fatality This is the concluding segment of a BBC documentary on Welsh boxer Johnny Owen. Owen died from injuries he suffered in a world bantamweight championship fight versus titleholder Lupe Pintor of Mexico on September 19, 1980. Owen's scrawny appearance--and his nickname the "Matchstick Man"--belied the fact he was a scrappy battler with a 25-1-1 record who held the Welsh, British, Commonwealth, and European bantamweight championships. The title fight took place in front of a hostile crowd of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans at the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles. Before, during, and after the fight, Owens' handlers and the Welsh fans who had travelled thousands of miles to support Owen were routinely pelted with cups of urine thrown at them by the Hispanic fans. Nevertheless, Owen surprised everyone by putting on a competitive fight. Some writers had Owen ahead after eight rounds, but he was tiring. In the ninth round he was knocked down for the first time in his pro career. In the fateful twelfth round, Pintor floored Owen again. Owen rose and a few seconds later was knocked unconscious by a Pintor straight right. A blood clot formed on Owen's brain. He never regained consciousness and died 45 days after the fight. He was 24 years old. Owen's family held no grudge against Pintor and encouraged him to continue his boxing career. When a memorial statue to Owen was about to erected in his hometown of Merthyr Tydfil, Wales in 2000, Owen's father insisted Pintor perform the official unveiling. Pintor obliged.
Tags: boxing  fatality  Johnny  Owen  Wales 
Added: 26th November 2012
Views: 1846
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Posted By: Lava1964
Valour Road - Victoria Cross The Victoria Cross is the most difficult military medal in the world to win. A recipient must be a member of the military of a British Commonwealth country and must perform an extraordinary feat of valour in the presence of the enemy. The feat also has to be witnessed. The circumstances surrounding the feats of all potential receipients are thoroughly investigated before the award can be given. Since 1856 there have been 94 Canadians who have won the VC. Against all odds, three recipients from the First World War all lived on Pine Street in Winnipeg. This Canadian Heritage Minute gives a hint of what they did.
Tags: Victoria  Cross  Winnipeg  Pine  Street  Valour  Road 
Added: 30th January 2013
Views: 936
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Posted By: Lava1964

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