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Gene Gene The Dancing Machine Eugene Patton, better known as Gene Gene The Dancing Machine, was a regular non-competing act on The Gong Show. Patton was an NBC stagehand. According to host Chuck Barris, Patton often danced backstage to the music of other acts. Barris thought Patton's style of dancing was amusing, so he persuaded Patton to dance on a show that was otherwise going to run a couple of minutes short. Strutting his stuff to a blended version of two Count Basie songs (Jumpin' at the Woodside and Two O'Clock Jump), the public reaction was favorable and Gene became a semi-regular. This clip shows an early appearance of Gene Gene the Dancing Machine because soon afterwards it became part of the shtick for Patton's fellow stagehands to litter the stage with an assortment of bizarre random objects: inflatable toys, sports equipment, clothing, furniture, mannequins, etc. (It was the 1970s. You had to be there.)
Tags: Gong  Show  Gene  Dancing  Machine 
Added: 1st October 2007
Views: 5597
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Posted By: Lava1964
Another Blast From The Past  PJ  PROBY PJ Proby was born James Marcus Smith in Houston TX, 11/06/38. I don't know what show this was from, but "Hold Me" was a big hit for Proby in 1964. There's a story about him that goes something like this: PJ was known for his exhausting visional stage performances. It was one of these performances on January 29, 1965, at Fairfield Hall, Croydon in London that Proby, who was the first male ever to wear his hair in a pony tail in the last century at least, burst out of his skin tight velvet bell-bottoms doing his act, based on the black shows he had been used to attending in the rougher areas of Downtown LA. He explained to the frantic press that the ripped clothing was an accident due to the weak velvet material, but when two days later the same thing again happened, the audiences were wild with excitement, as they had never witnessed such body movement onstage or such provocative mood and they loved him. However, the British system that governs the music scene was less enthusiastic. PJ was banned from all theaters in Great Britain and not allowed to perform his recordings on the B.B.C. or A.T.V. television stations. By February 24th, Proby was unable to perform almost anywhere although he was headline news in every newspaper.
Tags: pj  proby  hold  me  60's  rock  and  roll 
Added: 6th November 2007
Views: 2272
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Posted By: Naomi
Polyester leisure suit The ultimate men's fashion statement from the 1970s: the much-maligned polyester leisure suit! Polyester was first developed by British researchers during the Second World War. It became a consumer item in 1963 when an Illinois chemist named Delbert Meyer came up with a better way of producing the material. The new threads were blended with natural fibers to create clothing that almost felt like cotton or wool but was washable and wrinkle resistant. Cut from rolls of spongy double-knitted polyester, leisure suits came in all variety of colours: earth tones, blues, racing green, maroon, and the entire spectrum of pastel hues. Airless and horribly uncomfortable in hot and humid weather, polyester leisure suits clung to the wearer's arms and legs. The highly flammable synthetic melted when it burned and stuck to its wearer like napalm. Upper-class men were not impressed, and preferred to stick to their genuine wools, silks and cottons. One fashion writer declared, 'Leisure suits were just too democratic. They made everybody look like a bus driver.'
Tags: polyester  leisure  suit 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 2860
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Posted By: Lava1964
Destinations Tags: Destinations  Clothing  Yoga  Cathy 
Added: 22nd January 2008
Views: 1481
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Posted By: Cathy
South Fork Bridge Time Traveller Photo This photo, taken in Canada in 1941, has been the cause of considerable speculation. It was taken at a public ceremony in British Columbia to celebrate the reopening of the South Fork Bridge. Look at the individual with the clothing that seems to be from an era in the future. He is wearing what looks like modern sunglasses and a printed t-shirt--not items of clothing one would see in 1941.
Tags: time  traveller  photo  Canada 
Added: 24th May 2014
Views: 2657
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Posted By: Lava1964
Barbara Eden Tennis Outfit The fifth and final season of I Dream of Jeannie was not especially good. To make up for weak scripts, the plots often had Barbara Eden wearing tight, skimpy clothing--such as this tennis outfit. Anybody got a problem with that?
Tags: Barbara  Eden  tennis  outfit  I  Dream  of  Jeannie 
Added: 9th June 2009
Views: 7799
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Checking In - Sitcom Flop 1981 The Jeffersons was a hugely successful spinoff from All in the Family, running for 10 seasons from 1975 to 1985. It also inspired a not-so-successful spinoff: Checking In. On The Jeffersons, Marla Gibbs played Florence Johnston, the sassy, wisecracking maid who regularly exchanged insults with George Jefferson. Her character was so well liked by viewers that CBS figured it would be a smart move to give Gibbs her own series. Accordingly, in episode #154 and #155 of The Jeffersons, a hotel manager was so impressed by Florence that he offered her the job as supervisor of maids at his St. Frederick Hotel. Florence accepted and Checking In was born. It premiered on Thursday, April 9, 1981. Larry Linville (Major Frank Burns from MASH fame) played Lyle Block, the hotel's weasly manager and, naturally, Florence's nemesis. After four weeks, though, Checking In was floundering in the ratings and CBS pulled the plug after the April 30 episode. Smartly, the network had Gibbs return to the Jeffersons' household as their maid. In her return episode, #161, Florence arrives at the Jeffersons' door explaining that the hotel burned down! (Her clothing and hair had traces of soot and fire damage to add credibility to the plot twist!) She had to compete with new maid Carmen to get her old job back. After missing just five shows, Gibbs' Florence character remained on The Jeffersons until the series ended in 1985. Marla Gibbs was nominated for an Emmy as Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series Emmy in for five stright years (1981 through 1985) for her role as Florence Johnston. Gibbs' career accomplishments are even more impressive when one considers she was married at age 13 and had three children by age 20! She still managed to graduate from Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago. A performer in amateur theatricals, Gibbs was working as a customer service agent for United Airlines when she got her role on The Jeffersons. Cautiously, she waited until The Jeffersons was a bonafide hit show before quitting her job at United!
Tags: Marla  Gibbs  checking  In  Jeffersons  sitcom 
Added: 28th August 2011
Views: 2067
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Great Ziegfeld Tags:     bio  biography    celebrity    actor        famous    tv  television    film  life    story    narrative      behind  the  scenes    camera      Hollywood      studio      entertainment      money    star    makeup  clothing      fashion      The  Great  Ziegfeld    Biography 
Added: 21st October 2010
Views: 1069
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Posted By: Cliffy
Queen For A Day Total Television calls Queen For A Day, '...possibly the most maudlin game show ever broadcast'--and for good reason. Considered a forerunner of modern-day reality TV, QFAD was a successful radio program beginning in 1945 before airing on daytime television from 1956 through 1964. At the peak of the show's popularity in the late 1950s, NBC expanded it from 30 to 45 minutes to sell more commercials, at a then-premium rate of $4,000 per minute. QFAD opened with host Jack Bailey asking the largely female studio audience, 'Would YOU like to be queen for a day?' After this, the contestants were introduced and interviewed. Each contestant talked about recent financial and emotional hard times she had been through. The sob stories were rated on an applause meter. Bailey began each interview gently, asking the contestant first about her life and family, and maintaining a positive and upbeat response no matter what she told him. The interview climaxed with Bailey asking the contestant what she needed most and why she wanted to win the title of Queen for a Day. Often the request was for medical care or therapeutic equipment to help a chronically ill child, but sometimes it was as simple as the need for a hearing aid, a new washing machine, or a refrigerator. Many women broke down sobbing as they described their plights, and Bailey was always quick to comfort them and offer a clean white handkerchief to dry their eyes. The more pitiful the story a contestant had, the likelier the studio audience was to reach the applause meter's highest level. The winner, to the musical accompaniment of Pomp and Circumstance, would be draped in a sable-trimmed red velvet robe, given a glittering jeweled crown to wear, placed on a velvet-upholstered throne, and handed a dozen long-stemmed roses to hold as she wept, often uncontrollably, while her list of prizes was announced. The prizes began with the necessary help the woman had requested, but might include a vacation, a night on the town with her husband or escort, silver-plated flatware, an array of kitchen appliances, and a selection of fashion clothing. The losing contestants were each given smaller prizes; no one went away from the show without a meaningful gift. Bailey's trademark sign-off was 'This is Jack Bailey, wishing we could make every woman a queen--for every single day!' A 1970 short-lived syndicated revival of QFAD quickly fell into disfavor with viewers when it was revealed the 'contestants' were actually actresses.
Tags: Queen  For  A  Day  reality  TV  game  show 
Added: 24th February 2011
Views: 1537
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pringles Commercial 1990s Yes I'm aware they started in the lat 60's..Due to Popularity in the 90's with people, it goes here too. I at these why? cause the commercial and the fact I didn't really have any broken chips or got greasy. At one point in the early 1990s, "Corn Pringles" were available. The canister was black and had cartoon images of corn, as well as the normal packaging standards. The crisps were made of corn and resembled a corn chip in flavor and texture. Starting in the 1990s and continuing to today, Pringles has advertised their products by comparing them to bagged chips, which they view as greasy and broken. In each ad, a group of people are enjoying Pringles, while another person (usually alone) is enjoying a bag of unnamed potato chips that resembles either Lay's or Ruffles. They dump out some broken chips, only to find they're greasy, and end up wiping the grease all over their clothing.
Tags: Pringles  Commercial  1990s 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1704
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Posted By: masonx31

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