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Gino Vannelli - I Just wanna stop A very HOT August hit from 1978.
Tags: Gino  Vannelli  -  I  Just  wanna  stop  HOT  Italian  Canadian  Stallion 
Added: 22nd August 2009
Views: 1269
Posted By: Laura
Nanook of the North 1922 Robert J. Flaherty's Nanook of the North (1922) was the first feature length documentary film. It was shot in the Canadian arctic between August 1920 and March 1921. This highly acclaimed silent film was a world-wide box office hit. It showed an Inuk hunter and his family as they struggled to survive in the harsh conditions of the far north. Modern day documentarians tend to criticize Flaherty because many of the film's scenes sacrficed accuracy for dramatic effect. For example, Nanook and his fellow hunters are shown armed only with spears. In reality, by the 1920s the Inuk commonly hunted with firearms. Also 'Nanook' wasn't the central subject's real name and Nanook's 'wife' in the movie wasn't his wife at all.
Tags: Nanook  of  the  North 
Added: 3rd September 2009
Views: 892
Posted By: Lava1964
Marilyn Bell Swims Lake Ontario On September 9, 1954, Canadian teenager Marilyn Bell became the first person to swim across Lake Ontario. Some 300,000 onlookers witnessed her arrival near the Canadian National Exhibition grounds in Toronto 20 hours and 59 minutes after Bell began her swim in Youngstown, NY. Bell's feat was actually made in defiance of CNE organizers who had offered a $10,000 prize solely to American marathon swimmer Florence Chadwick. (Chadwick abandoned her effort after becoming ill. The CNE did award Bell the cash.) The straight-line distance of the swim was about 32 miles. Bell, who was a month shy of her seventeenth birthday, swam an estimated 40 miles while battling fifteen-foot waves and lamprey eels. Bell later swam both the English Channel and the Strait of Juan de Fuca before retiring from marathon swimming in 1958.
Tags: Marilyn  Bell  Lake  Ontario  swimmer 
Added: 6th September 2009
Views: 1825
Posted By: Lava1964
The Crucified Soldier One enduring controversy about the First World War is a grisly tale of a Canadian soldier who was allegedly found crucified to a wall of a barn in Belgium. The unsettling incident is said to have happened following the terrible Second Battle of Ypres in April 1915 where the Germans first used poison gas. Rumors abounded that the enraged Canadians were not too interested in capturing German prisoners. According to the story, the Germans retaliated by crucifying a random Canadian prisoner. According to reports form three Canadian soldiers, they witnessed a comrade, Sgt. Harry Band, impaled on a wall by five German bayonets. The tale, which spread quickly around the world through newspaper stories, was dismissed by many people as wartime propaganda. Depicting this event is this 32-inch bronze scultpure titled Canada's Golgotha. It was removed from a post-war art exhibit after formal complaints by the Germans who insisted the story was bogus. As late as 1989 the sculpture was hidden from public view. In 2002, a war researcher uncovered letters from supposed witnesses to the event that were written to Band's sister. These letters attest that the awful story was true. Band's body was never recovered. He is still listed among the missing in action.
Tags: First  World  War  crucified  soldier 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 2437
Posted By: Lava1964
Poppy - Symbol of Remembrance When Americans visit Canada in the the first days of November, they are often puzzled by the poppies Canadians wear on their jackets. The poppy is a symbol of remembrance that dates to the First World War. It is based upon a famous poem, In Flanders Fields. It was written by a Canadian battlefield surgeon John McCrae, who was in charge of an aid station in Belgium in 1915. McCrae wrote the verse after a close friend of his was killed by an artillery shell. (McCrae himself did not survive the war; he died of meningitis in 1918.) The full poem is below in the comments section. A good many Canadians know it by heart.
Tags: Remembrance  Day  Poppy 
Added: 11th November 2009
Views: 914
Posted By: Lava1964
Was Chester Arthur a Canadian Questions surrounding the birthplace of an American president are not new. It first happened more than a century ago with Chester Alan Arthur. Elected as vice-president in 1880, Arthur ascended to the White House in 1881 after James Garfield was assassinated. Arthur served as president until 1885. His administration is generally underrated by historians. Arthur was the son of Irish-born preacher William Arthur and Vermont-born Malvina Stone. Most official references list him as having been born in Fairfield in Franklin County, Vermont on October 5, 1829, but Arthur sometimes claimed to have born in 1830. (That is the year inscribed on his crypt. It also appears in some reference works.) Arthur's father had initially migrated to Dunham, Québec, Canada, where he and his wife owned a farm about 80 miles north of the American border. There has long been speculation that the future president was actually born on that Canadian farm and that his family moved to Fairfield afterward. If this is true, Arthur would have been constitutionally ineligible to serve as vice-president or president. Given the lack of official documentation and the seeming confusion about the year of Arthur's birth, historians have been unable to rule this possibility out. Although some of Arthur's political opponents circulated the Canadian-birthplace rumor during the 1880 election campaign, they could not prove it. No ironclad proof has emerged since.
Tags: Canada  Chester  Arthur  president 
Added: 17th November 2009
Views: 1077
Posted By: Lava1964
Robert Stanfield Fumble Photo Think liberal media bias is only common to American politics? Think again! Robert Stanfield is often referred to by Canada's political right as 'the greatest prime minister Canada never had.' On May 30, 1974, during the Canadian federal election campaign, photographer Doug Ball captured his most famous image--a shot of Conservative candidate Robert Stanfield dropping a football during a rest stop at North Bay, Ontario. '[Stanfield was] knock-kneed, hands clasped awkwardly, grimacing as a football slipped between his bony fingers,' recalled Ball. It was the defining photo of Stanfield’s political career. That afternoon, Stanfield aide Brad Chapman brought out a football for some exercise, and Ball shot 36 pictures of Stanfield throwing, catching and--just once--awkwardly fumbling the football. In a glaring example of ‘image politics’ all too common in Canada, the Toronto Globe and Mail ran the unflattering picture on its front page under the headline, 'A political fumble?' No Canadian newspaper ran any of the 35 available photos of Stanfield catching the ball. The photo may have cost him the election, but Stanfield never held any grudges about the photo, which won Ball a national newspaper award. He autographed a copy it for Ball more than a decade later, signing, ‘To Doug: I should’ve taken off my tie. Robert Stanfield.’
Tags: media  bias  Robert  Stanfield  football  fumble  photo 
Added: 18th September 2010
Views: 3362
Posted By: Lava1964
Our Gang - Peggy Cartwright Canadian-born Peggy Cartwright was the first of the Our Gang leading ladies. As a 10-year-old she appeared in five Our Gang shorts when the series began in 1922. She was replaced by Mary Kornman (who is often wrongly called the first Our Gang leading female) shortly thereafter. Cartwright married William Walker, the black actor best known for his role as a minister in To Kill a Mockingbird. Cartwright died in 2001 at age 88. She was the last of the original 1922 Our Gang kids.
Tags: Our  Gang  Peggy  Cartwright 
Added: 21st December 2009
Views: 2277
Posted By: Lava1964
Canadian Second World War Prisoners This is a photo of a group of Canadian prisoners of war shortly after they were liberated in 1945. They had been captured by the Japanese after the defense of Hong Kong collapsed on Christmas Day 1941. Badly mistreated, they were used as slave labor in Japanese mines. Their emaciated condition speaks volumes.
Tags: Second  World  War  prisoners  Canadians 
Added: 3rd March 2010
Views: 1672
Posted By: Lava1964
1924 Canadian Olympic Hockey Team This is a photo of Canada's first Olympic hockey team. At the inaugural Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France in 1924, Canada sent a local amateur team (the Toronto Granites) to compete against the world's best. The results were horribly lopsided, to say the least: Playing three games in three days, Canada overwhelmed their Pool 'A' opponents. The Canadians thumped Czechoslovakia 30-0, Sweden 22-0, and Switzerland 33-0. In the medal round, Canada beat Great Britain 19-2 and the United States 6-1 to capture the gold medals. (Entering that final game, the Americans had outscored Belgium, France, Great Britain and Sweden by an aggregate score of 72-0.) Overall, Canada outscored its five opponents 110-3. Harry Watson scored 37 of Canada's goals. The Canadians' victory was so decisive that Canada was awarded an automatic bye into the final round at the next Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland in 1928. None of the Canadians ever played pro hockey.
Tags: hockey  Olympics  Canada 
Added: 4th March 2010
Views: 994
Posted By: Lava1964

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