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Theme From The Bridge on the River Kwai The Bridge on the River Kwai won the Oscar for Best Picture of 1957. It also re-popularized "The Colonel Bogey March"--a British military song dating back to 1914. It is one of those melodies that sticks in your mind forever. In this scene from early in the film, a new batch of British Empire troops whistle the tune as they march into captivity in a brutal Japanese labor camp.
Tags: Bridge  on  the  River  Kwai  theme 
Added: 12th July 2015
Views: 1540
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Posted By: Lava1964
Campbell-Hyland 1913 Boxing Photo Normally I don't approve of colorizing black-and-white photos, but this one shows why sometimes it makes a difference. The final bell has just ended a gory May 3, 1913 boxing match in Steveston, British Columbia between welterweights Ray Campbell and Dick Hyland. Each fighter has his armed raised in victory by his respective manager after 15 rounds of what must have been intense action. (Campbell, the fighter on the left, won the decision.) I bet nobody in the crowd was clamoring for a refund.
Tags: boxing  Campbell-Hyland  blood 
Added: 30th September 2015
Views: 976
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rene Higuita Scorpion Kick In the early 1990s Colombia's national soccer team featured a flamboyant goalkeeper named Rene Higuita. He was rightly nicknamed El Loco (The Madman) for his daring, foolhardy style of play. This short clip is a great example: During a friendly match versus England at Wembley Stadium in 1995, the 29-year-old Higuita displayed his 'scorpion kick' save to the world--and to a disbelieving British TV announcer.
Tags: Rene  Higuita  scorpion  kick  Colombia  soccer 
Added: 2nd November 2015
Views: 944
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Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 1192
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Posted By: Lava1964
Four British Sovereigns in One Photo This 1899 photograph is remarkable in that it shows the reigning British monarch and her three linear successors. Seated is Queen Victoria. Standing to the right is her eldest son, future King Edward VII. Standing beside him is his eldest surviving son, the future King George V. The small boy is his eldest son, the future King Edward VIII.
Tags: four  British  monarchs  royalty  Great  Britain 
Added: 29th January 2016
Views: 1017
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pickles the Pooch Finds Stolen World Cup The Jules Rimet Trophy--more commonly known as soccer's World Cup--was stolen on March 20, 1966. It was snatched from a glass display case at Methodist Central Hall in the Westminster section of London, England when the security guard assigned to keep an eye on it was temporarily absent from his post. England was going to host the quadrennial soccer tourney in three months--and the theft was a huge embarrassment for the country's Football Association. Shortly thereafter Joe Mears, the president of the F.A., received a parcel containing part of the World Cup. It was accompanied by a ransom note from a man calling himself Jackson. It demanded 15,000 British pounds in small denominations or else he would melt down the golden symbol of soccer supremacy. Mears contacted the police who arranged for a detective named Len Buggy to act on behalf of the ailing Mears who suffered from heart trouble. Buggy agreed to meet Jackson at London's Battersea Park at a specified time. Buggy brought a briefcase containing only about 500 pounds but Jackson did not bother to count it. Instead he got into Buggy's car and instructed him to drive aimlessly around London for 10 minutes. Jackson noticed a police van tailing the car. He panicked and attempted to escape on foot. He was quickly apprehended and identified as Edward Betchley, a 46-year-old army veteran. He claimed to be acting as a middle-man for a mysterious fellow he called The Pole. Betchley was the only man who was ever arrested in connection with the crime. He served two years in prison and died shortly thereafter of emphysema in 1969. The World Cup was missing for a week until David Corbett took Pickles--his mongrel dog--for a walk in the Norwich section of London on March 27. Pickles was drawn to a bundle tightly wrapped in newspaper lying near a parked car. Corbett removed the newspaper and there was the World Cup! Corbett immediately contacted police--who promptly interrogated him as a possible suspect. They finally let him go at 2:30 a.m. for lack of evidence. Pickles became a celebrity pooch. He was named Dog of the Year, was awarded a year's supply of dog food, appeared on several British TV shows, and had a feature role in a movie. Pickles was also invited to appear on TV programs in Chile, Yugoslavia and Brazil, but Corbett declined the offers as they would have required Pickles to go through strict quarantine measures and get several vaccinations to travel abroad. Corbett estimates that Pickles earned him 3000 pounds--money he put toward the purchase of a new house. When England won the World Cup on July 30, Pickles was invited to attend the team's private post-match victory party--a gathering so exclusive that even the players' wives were barred by the F.A.! Sadly Pickles accidentally suffocated in 1967 when his choke leash became entangled in a tree.
Tags: Pickles  dog  stolen  World  Cup  soccer 
Added: 19th February 2016
Views: 2266
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bannister-Landy Miracle Mile 1954 One of the most famous track-and-field events of all time occurred on August 7, 1954. In May 1954 England's 25-year-old Roger Bannister became the first runner to record a sub-four-minute mile when he ran a 3:59.4 race at Oxford. About six weeks later, Australia's John Landy, age 24, claimed the world record by running the mile in an unheard of 3:58 flat in Finland. The two men would meet head-to-head in the British Empire Games in Vancouver in August 1954 in a race as eagerly anticipated as any in history. Landy had a reputation for establishing an insurmountable early lead in races and coasting to wins. Bannister, however, was known for possessing a strong finishing kick. This rare clip is from the CBC archives in Canada; it shows the entire race. Two things to watch: Look at how the front-running Landy constantly looks behind him to see where Bannister is. Also notice that every activity on the infield came to a standstill as all eyes were glued to the "Miracle Mile" race unfolding on the track.
Tags: Miracle  Mile  Roger  Bannister  John  Landy  Vancouver  British  Empire  Games 
Added: 12th October 2016
Views: 1508
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rarest Canadian Coin - 1936 Dot Cent The rarest and most desirable coin in Canadian history is the "1936 dot" one-cent coin. Only three are known to exist. Why were they struck? On January 20, 1936, King George V died shortly after his 71st birthday. As is customary with Canadian coinage, if a monarch dies anytime during a year, his/her portrait remains on all the coins minted in that year. George V was succeeded on the throne by his eldest son, Edward VIII. Anyone with even passing knowledge of the history of the British royal family ought to know that Edward VIII abdicated late in 1936 in order to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. He was succeeded by his younger brother, who became George VI. This presented a problem for the Royal Canadian Mint. It had already prepared dies for its 1937 coins with the likeness of Edward VIII, which were now outdated and useless. It was feared that the new dies with George VI's head would not be ready for striking in 1937. The mint conceived a backup plan: They would reissue the 1936 coins bearing George V's likeness, but place a dot below the 1936 date to indicate they were made during the 1937 mintage year. Only three samples of the one-cent coin bearing the distinctive dot were struck--and all three were kept by the director of the mint. As it turned out, the dies for 1937 with George VI's head were ready in time for 1937 strikes, so the 1936 dot coins were not needed. One of the three rare coins sold at auction in 2013 for about $250,000 U.S.
Tags: 1936  dot  Canadian  cent  rare  numismatics 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 1208
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fair Exchange - Failed Sitcom In September 1962 CBS unveiled something new--an hour-long sitcom titled Fair Exchange. Its premise was that an American family and a British family swapped teenage daughters for a year. Why? The two families' patriarchs had been Second World War flying buddies. The American daughter, Patty Walker, wanted to study in London, so the two families, in effect, arranged their own version of an exchange student program. (Judy Carne played the English teen, Heather Finch. It was her first American television role. Even though she played a teenager, Carne was 23 years old at the time.) The episodes generally focused on the difficulties each girl had adopting to the cultural differences of her new location. Filmed in both England and Hollywood, the 60-minute format proved too unwieldy and the show was canceled in December 1962. Three months later, after loyal fans put pressure on CBS, the network returned Fair Exchange to its schedule--but only in a revised half-hour format. Ratings did not merit the show continuing beyond one season, however. Fair Exchange was again cancelled before the 1963-64 TV season began after 27 episodes. Here is the opening montage for the 60-minute version.
Tags: Fair  Exchange  sitcom  Judy  Carne  CBS 
Added: 26th April 2018
Views: 745
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Posted By: Lava1964

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