Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Neville Chamberlain - Peace In Our Time One of history's most infamous photographs: It was taken on September 30, 1938 at England's Heston Aerodrome. British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain has returned from a meeting with Adolf Hitler in Munich. As part of Chamberlain's appeasement policy to avert war, Chamberlain (and his French counterpart Edouard Daladier) had just agreed to Hitler's demand that the Sudetenland and Czechoslovakia be annexed into the German reich. Chamberlain is shown holding the document signed by Hitler that Chamberlain insisted would guarantee 'peace in our time.'
Tags: Neville  Chamberlain  Munich  Agreement 
Added: 6th January 2010
Views: 3784
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Britain Adopts Decimal Currency - 1971 February 15, 1971 was the momentous day when Great Britain ditched its old, antiquated monetary system and finally replaced it with 'decimal' currency similar to the United States and Canada. Under the old cumbersome currency of pounds, shillings, and pence, the pound was made up of 240 pence (denoted by the letter d for Latin denarius and now referred to as 'old pence'), with 12 pence in a shilling and 20 shillings (denoted by s for Latin solidus) in a pound. In an era before widespread computer use, monetary calculation, such as adding up sums of money, was far more complicated than with a decimal currency. Tourists were also confused by coins such as the 'half-crown' (worth two shillings and sixpence, or one eighth of a pound). Such a move had been encouraged by economists since the 1840s. British banks were closed for two days to prepare for 'Decimal Day.' It was also specifically scheduled for mid-February--statistically the slowest banking period of the year in Britain. From that day forward there have been 100 new pence to the British pound.
Tags: decimal  day  coinage  money  Britain 
Added: 7th January 2010
Views: 1269
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Fords Theater Playbill 4-14-1865 The playbill from Ford's Theatre on the night Abraham Lincoln was shot. The featured attraction was a performance of the comedic play Our American Cousin. Laura Keene, a renowned British actress, was the lead. It was also a milestone 1000th performance of the play.
Tags: playbill  Fords  Theater 
Added: 16th April 2010
Views: 2402
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Time Magazine - Wallis Simpson In 1936 Wallis Simpson, the twice-divorced American woman who caused a constitutional crisis in the British Empire because she was deemed unsuitable to be the wife of King Edward VIII, was the first woman to be named Time Magazine's Person of the Year.
Tags: Wallis  Simpson  monarchy  Time 
Added: 24th May 2010
Views: 2000
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lolita Controversy Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita deals with a middle-aged writer's sexual infatuation with a 12-year-old girl. Due to its shocking and risque subject matter, Nabokov was unable to find an American publisher for Lolita after finishing his manuscript in 1953. After four refusals, he finally resorted to Olympia Press in Paris in September 1955. (The photo below shows a copy of a first edition.) Although the first printing of 5,000 copies sold out quickly, there were no substantial reviews. However, at the end of 1955, Graham Greene, in an interview with the Times of London, called Lolita one of the best novels of 1955. This statement provoked a response from London's Sunday Express, whose editor called it 'the filthiest book I have ever read' and 'sheer unrestrained pornography.' British Customs officers were then instructed by a panicked Home Office to seize all copies entering the United Kingdom. In December 1956, the French followed suit and the Minister of the Interior banned Lolita. (The ban lasted for two years.) Its eventual British publication by Weidenfeld and Nicolson caused a scandal that contributed to the end of the political career of one of the publishers, Nigel Nicolson. In contrast, American officials were initially nervous, but the first American edition was issued without problems by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1958, and was a bestseller--the first book since Gone with the Wind to sell 100,000 copies in the first three weeks of publication. Today Lolita is widely considered to be one of the finest novels of the 20th century. In 1998, it was named the fourth greatest English language novel of the 20th century by the Modern Library.
Tags: fiction  Lolita  publishing  controversy 
Added: 8th July 2010
Views: 3212
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
HMS Hood Explosion 1941 The battlecruiser HMS Hood was the pride of the British navy between the two world wars. It was actually obsolete by the time the Second World War started, but it was urgently needed despite its shortcomings. On May 24, 1941, in the Battle of the Denmark Strait, the Hood was engaged in an 11-minute skirmish with the German warships Prinz Eugen and Bismarck. A single 1700-pound armor-piercing shell from the Bismarck ripped into the Hood causing a giant fireball and a subsequent massive explosion. The Hood split into two sections and sank in just three minutes. About 150 minutes later, only three surviving British sailors from the Hood's crew of 1,415 were plucked from the cold Atlantic by the destroyer Electra: Ted Briggs, Robert Tilburn, and William Dundas. None was older than 20. The sinking of the Hood and the loss of more than 99.7 percent of its crew stunned the British public. The three survivors became reluctant celebrities and were always emotional when pressed to talk about that day in 1941. Dundas died in an automobile accident in 1965. Tilburn died in 1995. Briggs, the youngest of the three, died in 2008 at the age of 85. Briggs participated in a 2001 ceremony in which a memorial plaque was laid on the Hood's wreckage and debris field.
Tags: British  navy  Hood  explosion   
Added: 27th July 2010
Views: 3734
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1912 British Olympic Womens Swim Team These four swimmers represented Great Britain at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm. They won the gold medal in the 4 x 100 relay. My research says they are Belle Moore, Jennie Fletcher, Annie Speirs, and Irene Steer, although I don't know which one is which. (I don't know who the dour lady in the middle is. A chaperon or coach, perhaps? She looks like a million laughs.) Women's swimming made its debut in these 1912 Olympics. The British team's winning time was five minutes, 52.8 seconds. By comparison, the gold-medal-winning time of the Australian team at the 2008 Beijing Olympics was three minutes, 52.69 seconds--more than two full minutes ahead of the 1912 pace. The entire 1912 Olympic swimming program was contested in just one day.
Tags: Olympics  swimming  British  women 
Added: 21st September 2010
Views: 4246
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Funeral of King Edward VII This is a still photo of the funeral of Great Britain's King Edward VII in London on May 20, 1910. It brought together a remarkable collection of European royalty never before or afterward assembled. Mourning the 'uncle of Europe' was the new British king, Edward's son, George V. In addition, there were eight crowned heads in the procession: the German Emperor, plus the kings of Norway, Greece, Spain, Bulgaria, Denmark, Portugal, and Belgium. There were about 30 European princes among the mourners too--including Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. His assassination in 1914 was the powder keg that triggered the First World War. Most of the royalty present at Edward's funeral met inglorious ends as many European monarchies crumbled during the war or shortly afterward.
Tags: royalty  funeral  Great  Britain  Edward 
Added: 11th December 2010
Views: 2532
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Saturday Night Live With Howard Cosell Saturday Night Live with Howard Cosell was a dreadful variety program that ran on ABC from September 1975 to January 1976. It, of course, was hosted by sports announcer Howard Cosell and produced by Roone Arledge of Monday Night Football fame. It was later remembered by its director Don Mischer as 'one of the greatest disasters in the history of television,' largely due to Cosell and Arledge being unfamiliar with comedy and variety programming. Coincidentally, that same year NBC began airing a late-night comedy show titled Saturday Night. The shows did not directly compete. (Cosell's program aired at 8 p.m. whereas NBC's show aired at 11:30 p.m.) Cosell's show featured Bill Murray, Brian Doyle-Murray, and Christopher Guest as regular comedy performers dubbed 'The Prime Time Players.' In response, the NBC show called its regular performers 'the Not-Ready-For-Prime-Time Players.' Ironically, all three of the original Prime Time Players eventually joined the NBC show. The premiere episode featured celebrity guests Frank Sinatra, Shirley Bassey, Paul Anka, Siegfried and Roy, the cast of the Broadway version of The Wiz, Jimmy Connors, John Denver and the Bay City Rollers (whom Cosell dubbed 'the next British phenomenon'). The show was often hectic and unprepared. In one instance, Arledge learned that Lionel Hampton was in New York City and invited the musician to appear just an hour before airtime. The show fared poorly among critics and audiences alike, with TV Guide calling it 'dead on arrival, with a cringingly awkward host.' Alan King, the show's 'executive in charge of comedy,' admitted it was difficult to turn Cosell into a variety show host, saying Cosell 'made Ed Sullivan look like Buster Keaton.' Saturday Night Live with Howard Cosell was canceled on January 17, 1976, after only 18 episodes. A year later, in 1977, NBC's Saturday Night was renamed Saturday Night Live.
Tags: Saturday  Night  Live  Howard  Cosell  variety  TV 
Added: 17th December 2010
Views: 2829
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Temple-Graham Greene Lawsuit Before Graham Greene became a famous novelist, he was a freelance writer and critic for several British publications. In 1937, his review of the Shirley Temple movie Wee Willie Winkie in the magazine Night and Day outraged the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Greene basically described the nine-year-old Temple as sexually provocative. Wrote Greene, 'Infancy is [Temple’s] disguise, her appeal is secret and adult with the seductiveness of a [Marlene] Dietrich...Her well-developed rump twists in a tap-dance...She measures a man with agile studio eyes and dimpled depravity. Her admirers-–middle-aged men and clergymen-–respond to her dubious coquetry and well-shaped and desirable little body...Hear the gasp of her antique audience. Some of her popularity seems to rest on an oddly precocious body as voluptuous in grey flannel trousers as Miss Dietrich’s.' 20th Century Fox sued Night and Day on behalf of their star actress and won a judgment of 3,500 British pounds. The lawsuit bankrupted the magazine.
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Graham  Greene  lawsuit 
Added: 18th January 2011
Views: 3815
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 6 7 8 9 10 11 [12] 13 14 15 16 of 16 | Random