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Singer Teresa Brewer Makes 3  Passes today at 76 NEW YORK - Singer Teresa Brewer, who topped the charts in the 1950s with hits like "Till I Waltz Again with You," and performed with jazz legends Count Basie and Duke Ellington, died Wednesday. She was 76. This is a clip from her 1981 concert. Brewer died at her New Rochelle home of a neuromuscular disease, said family spokesman Bill Munroe. Her four daughters were at her bedside. Brewer had scores of hits in the 1950s and a burgeoning film career, but she pared down her public life to raise her children. She re-emerged a decade later to perform with jazz greats Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie and Wynton Marsalis.
Tags: Singer  Teresa  Brewer  Makes  3    Passes  today  at  76 
Added: 18th October 2007
Views: 2047
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Posted By: Old Fart
Eddie Gaedel Midget Pinch Hitter Probably my favorite sports story is the day a midget, Eddie Gaedel, batted in a major league game. The date was August 19, 1951. The lacklustre St. Louis Browns were hosting the Detroit Tigers in a Sunday doubleheader. Browns' owner Bill Veeck promised that anyone who bought a ticket would see a memorable sight. He was right. Gaedel, all 3'7" of him, took part in a brewery promotion between games. Gaedel, clad it a batboy's uniform bearing the number 1/8 and carrying a toy bat, made baseball history in the first inning of the second game when he batted for outfielder Frank Saucier. Bob Cain, the Detroit pitcher, nearly doubled over in laughter at the sight of Gaedel and walked him on four pitches--all of them high. Once Gaedel trotted down to first base he was replaced by pinch runner Jim Delsing. Gaedel's picture appeared in virtually every newspaper in North America the next day. That same day American League president Will Harridge banned midgets from baseball. Most of the players involved in the stunt relished their connection to it. Jim Delsing said, 'A lot of guys have hit 50 home runs in a season, but I'm the only guy who ever ran for a midget.'
Tags: Eddie  Gaedel  baseball 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 4253
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mmmmmm....Beer commercial montage Today's fun activity is to track the number of breweries represented and guess which ones are still in business today..
Tags:     Beer    commercial    montage    late    1960 
Added: 21st June 2008
Views: 1131
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Posted By: Cliffy
Theresa Brewer - Pickle-Up-A-Doodle I wonder who dreamed this one up?
Tags: Theresa  Brewer 
Added: 6th December 2008
Views: 3666
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Posted By: barbikins
Seattle Pilots The Seattle Pilots were an American League baseball club that lasted just one season--1969. This is the official team logo. The Pilots began play the same year as the Kansas City Royals, the San Diego Padres, and the Montreal Expos. The Pilots' owners were granted a team because they assured Major League Baseball a domed stadium would be built in Seattle within two years. That didn't happen. Instead they played at an antiquated minor league park called Sick's Stadium. The venue was so shoddy that seats were still being renovated on Opening Day. Visiting teams hated playing in Seattle because the ballpark's plumbing was horribly inadequate, forcing them to shower at their hotel. The stadium's toilets often failed when more than 10,000 people came to games. (That seldom happened; the Pilots drew just 677,944 fans for their 74 home dates. Still, the Pilots outdrew four other MLB clubs in 1969.) The team alienated potential supporters by having no local TV deal and charging as much as (gasp!) $6 per ticket--the highest price in MLB at the time. After finishing in last place in the American League West with a 64-98 record, and incurring losses of about $250,000, the team uprooted and moved to Milwaukee in 1970 and became the Brewers. Oddly enough, there is more interest in the Pilots now than when they were around. Mainly it is because of pitcher Jim Bouton's irreverent book, Ball Four.
Tags: Seattle  Pilots  baseball 
Added: 18th May 2009
Views: 1147
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Posted By: Lava1964

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