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Phil Esposito Bobby Orr SI Cover Phil Espositio and Bobby Orr, the two kingpins of the great Boston Bruins 1971-72 team, graced the cover of Sports Illustrated during the 1972 Stanley Cup finals, won by the Bruins in six games over the New York Rangers.
Tags: Boston  Bruins  NHL  hockey  Esposito  Orr 
Added: 31st May 2011
Views: 2079
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boston Bruins - 1972 Stanley Cup Champs I posted this on the CBC News website in Canada following the Boston Bruins' Stanley Cup championship on June 15, 2011. It got such a wonderful response that I thought I'd share it here too: It had been 14,279 days since captain Johnny Bucyk hoisted the Boston Bruins' last Stanley Cup on May 11, 1972. To put things in perspective... Richard Nixon was in the White House. America still had combat troops in Vietnam. If you bought a quarter's worth of candy, you could get sick eating it all. Pitchers still batted in the American League. There was no such thing as rap music or punk rock. Nobody considered the possibility of terrorist attacks at the Olympics. The NHL had 14 teams. Few players wore helmets. Some goalies didn't wear masks. Nobody seriously thought hockey players from the USSR were good. There were hardly any McDonald's Restaurants in Canada. There were very few Tim Hortons either. Archie Bunker was in his heyday. Television sets had rabbit ears. Nobody thought the world was in peril from global warming or climate change or whatever they're calling it this week. Lotteries were illegal in Canada. Arthur Godfrey Time had still been on the radio two weeks earlier. Calculators could perform four functions and cost $179. Most people had rotary telephones. Forget about DVD players--VCRs didn't exist. The idea of bottled water would have been laughable. Computers were enormous things that occupied entire rooms and did simple calculations using punch cards. Hardware meant hammers and wrenches. Software didn't mean anything. People still sent telegrams. Life Magazine was still around. Canada still had the death penalty. O.J. Simpson was a hero. The Lord's Prayer was recited in public schools. Nobody thought it was wrong. A new car cost $2500. Hockey cards were a dime a pack--and they came with pink bubble gum covered in powdered sugar. Bobby Orr was the greatest player in the NHL. (Thirty-nine years later he's still the greatest of all time.).
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  1972  Stanley  Cup 
Added: 16th June 2011
Views: 3300
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Posted By: Lava1964
1896 Five-Dollar Silver Certificate Controversy A new series of $1, $2 and $5 banknotes were printed by the U.S. government in 1896. Known to collectors as the "educational series," the banknotes used classical art motifs to promote advancements in science. For example, the $5 silver certificate's design (shown below) highlighted the new importance that electricity brought to modern society. However, the naked breasts on the female figures sent some prudish folks into a tizzy. Some merchants and bankers in Boston considered the $5 bills to be obscene and refused to accept them--thus creating the term 'banned in Boston.' Despite the controversy, many banknote collectors consider the 1896 series to be the most beautiful ever produced by the U.S. government.
Tags: 1896  banknotes  numismatics  controversy 
Added: 17th July 2011
Views: 3380
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Posted By: Lava1964
26-Inning MLB Game - 1920 The longest game (by innings) in Major League Baseball's long history was a 26-inning, 1-1 tie. It was a National League game between the Boston Braves and Brooklyn Robins played at Braves Field in Boston on May 1, 1920. Amazingly, both starting pitchers--Brooklyn's Leon Cadore and Boston's Joe Oeschger--went the distance. Since night baseball didn't begin in MLB until 1935, the game was stopped by plate umpire Barry McCormick due to impending darkness. It had to be replayed in its entirety, but all the stats from the 26-inning tie counted. Remarkably, by modern standards, the game took only 3 hours and 50 minutes to play. It had started at 3:00 p.m., as was the custom in those days, and ended at 6:50 p.m. Several players unsuccessfully lobbied umpire McCormick to extend the game one more inning so they could say they played the equivalent of three nine-inning games. The press box at Braves Field did not have electric lights so reporters and telegraphers had to submit their accounts of the record-setting game using candlelight. Some trivia from the game: The score had been tied 1-1 since the sixth inning. The attendance was about 3,500. Cadore faced 95 Boston batters. Oeschger pitched to a mere 90 Robins, but his 21 consecutive scoreless innings established a record. Braves' first baseman Walter Holke recorded the ridiculous total of 43 putouts. Boston's second baseman, Charlie Pick, set a record too, but not a positive one: His one-game total of 11 official at-bats without a hit has never been matched. Years later Cadore remembered the aftereffects of the game. "My arm stiffened. I couldn't raise it to comb my hair for three days," he said. "After seven days of rest I was back taking my regular turn. I never had a sore arm before or after the game. I suppose the nervous energy of trying to win the game gave me the strength to keep me going."
Tags: baseball  MLB  longest  game  26  innings  Braves  Robins 
Added: 13th September 2011
Views: 3346
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chick Stahl Mysterious Suicide - 1907 One of baseball's most peculiar mysteries was the suicide of Chick Stahl, the 34-year-old player-manager of the Boston Americans (later called the Red Sox), who took his own life on March 28, 1907 during spring training. Stahl's death by his own hand stunned the baseball world as Stahl was known as a happy-go-lucky fellow. The New York Times reported Stahl's death this way: WEST BADEN, Ind., March 29. — Charles Sylvester Stahl, known to baseball "rooters" throughout the country as "Chick" Stahl, the center fielder, and until two days ago the manager of the Boston American team, committed suicide in his room at the West Baden Springs Hotel by swallowing carbolic acid. He was dead when found. President Taylor of the club, who succeeded Stahl in the management of the team, immediately ordered the practice of the men stopped. When Stahl arose to-day he was in his usual good spirits. He shared his room with his eldest friend, ex-manager Jimmy Collins, and when the time came for going to practice, Stahl was not on hand. After waiting some time, Collins went to the room, and Stahl told him he had just drank some carbolic acid. In a few minutes he was in terrible agony, and to some of the members of the team who Collins called to the room Stahl said: "Boys, I couldn't help it; it drove me to it." The players did not know what their comrade meant, but they did know he was worried about something, as they had taken away a bottle of carbolic acid from him only a few days ago while the team was at Louisville, KY. (One unproven theory for Stahl's suicide claims that Stahl was being blackmailed by a woman who became pregnant by him. Stahl had gotten married just four months earlier. His widow died only a year after Stahl's suicide.) A friend in Fort Wayne, IN--where Stahl was laid to rest in a funeral attended by thousands--committed suicide in the same manner on March 30, adding another layer of intrigue to the mystery.
Tags: baseball  suicide  Chick  Stahl 
Added: 5th December 2011
Views: 1995
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cliff Clavins Theories on Beer Tags: Cliff  Clavins,  Theories  on  Beer,  Cheers,  Boston,  Beantown 
Added: 6th December 2011
Views: 1263
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Posted By: Cliffy
Ted Williams SI Cover 1969 It's difficult to picture Ted Williams in anything but a Boston Red Sox uniform, but he was the manager of the lowly Washington Senators for a time. (In fact, Williams was the last manager the Senators ever had. He held that job from 1969 through 1971. When the team became the Texas Rangers in 1972, Williams managed the club in their first season.) Here he is on the cover of Sports Illustrated at age 50 in 1969.
Tags: baseball  Ted  Williams  manager 
Added: 7th December 2011
Views: 1718
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Posted By: Lava1964
Baseballs Lost Teams This is an informative short feature about three MLB teams that were in existence for half a century but found new homes in the 1950s: the St. Louis Browns, the Boston Braves, and the Philadelphia Athletics.
Tags: MLB  lost  teams  defunct 
Added: 2nd January 2014
Views: 1504
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Posted By: Lava1964
Babe Ruth  - Final Game With Yankees This photo issued by Acme Newspictures on September 30, 1934, shows the immortal Babe Ruth exiting Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. following the New York Yankees' final game of the 1934 season. Washington won 5-3 in a game that took just 80 minutes to play. Ruth went 0-for-3 at the plate but did score a run before being replaced by Myril Hoag in right field. Detroit won the American League pennant in 1934, so there would be no World Series farewell for Ruth. Ruth was honored at Griffith Stadium earlier that day with gifts and he announced his retirement from baseball before a crowd of about 15,000. (Before the 1935 season Ruth was convinced to return to the game by Boston Braves owner Judge Emil Fuchs. He only played a month before quitting the last-place Braves.) Ruth's departure from the Yankees was bitter and messy. His playing skills were obviously diminishing and Lou Gehrig was now the team's star attraction. After years of unsuccessfully lobbying for the managerial position with Yankees' owner Jacob Ruppert, Ruth had had enough. This photo shows a dejected Ruth, with his head down, making his exit outside the ballpark. A boy is shown trying to chase down the Babe for an autograph, but Ruth (who usually accommodated everyone) was in a foul mood and had no time to pen the lad's baseball. A policeman is gesturing with his hands to the kid with a "not-today-son" motion. Six days earlier, on Monday, September 24, 1934, Ruth made his final Yankee Stadium appearance as a player in New York's 5-0 loss to the Boston Red Sox. He was pulled early in the game from his right feld position. There were no special ceremonies to mark the occasion. Fewer than 2,000 fans attended the game.
Tags: baseball  Babe  Ruth  Yankees  photo 
Added: 22nd May 2012
Views: 3387
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gene Stephens 3-Hit Inning On June 18, 1953, 20-year-old Gene Stephens collected three hits in one inning for the Boston Red Sox during a 23-3 victory over the Detroit Tigers at Fenway Park. The Bosox exploded for 17 runs in the seventh inning - sending 23 batters to the plate during their 47-minute half of the frame. Stephens had a double and two singles off three different Detroit pitchers. The 17 runs scored by Boston in that inning were two more than the previous modern MLB record, set by the Brooklyn Dodgers in a May 21, 1952, contest against the Cincinnati Reds. The Red Sox had 14 hits in their memorable inning to set a new modern MLB mark in that category. Gene Stephens was mostly a reserve player in his 12 MLB seasons. His batting average was only .204 in 1953, making his three-hit inning on June 18 even more surprising. The Red Sox led 5-3 going into their half of the seventh inning. Detroit pitcher Steve Gromek allowed nine of the 17 runs while Dick Weik and Earl Harrist each allowed four. Boston had 27 total hits in the game. The day before, they had 20 hits when they walloped Detroit 17-1. “I was the youngest ballplayer in the major leagues at the time,” Stephens recalled years later, whose three-hit performance was witnessed by only 3,108 Fenway fans that afternoon. “I probably shouldn’t have even been in the major leagues at that time. Ted Williams had gone to the Korean War and, therefore, that gave me the opportunity to play. As soon as [Williams] came back, the Red Sox optioned me down to their AAA team in Louisville." The all-time record for most runs scored in an inning is 18, set by the Chicago White Stockings against the Detroit Wolverines on Sept. 6, 1883, in a National League affair. During that onslaught (also in the seventh inning), three different Chicago players had three hits in the frame: Tommy Burns (two doubles, one home run), Fred Pfeffer (two singles, one double), and Ned Williamson (two singles, one double). The only other hitter in modern MLB history (since 1900) with three hits in one inning was Johnny Damon, who was also a member of the Boston Red Sox. Damon achieved his feat when Boston whipped the Florida Marlins 25-8 on June 27, 2003. Damon collected three hits (a single, double, and triple) in the first inning as the Bosox scored a record 10 runs before any Boston batter was put out.
Tags: baseball  Gene  Stephens  hits  Red  Sox 
Added: 27th May 2012
Views: 2044
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Posted By: Lava1964

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