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First Goalie Mask - 1929 In 1929 Clint Benedict of the Montreal Maroons became the first goalie to wear a mask in a National Hockey League game. Benedict had suffered a broken nose in a previous game. To continue playing, Benedict commissioned a Boston leather goods company to make an experimental mask for him. The novelty didn't last very long--just one game. Benedict said the contraption obscured his view on low shots. New York Ranger goalie Charlie Rayner wore a partial mask for a few games in 1947 to protect a broken jaw, but he too complained of impaired vision and discarded it. Another dozen years would pass before NHL goalie Jacques Plante ushered in the modern goalie mask in 1959.
Tags: Clint  Benedict  goalie  mask 
Added: 15th August 2009
Views: 4468
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Posted By: Lava1964
Worst MLB Team - 1916 Athletics The 1927 New York Yankees are usually considered by baseball history buffs to be the greatest MLB team ever assembled. But which team was the worst? My choice for the worst baseball team (of the 20th century, at least) goes to the pitiful 1916 Philadelphia Athletics. They finished at the bottom of the American League standings that year with an awful 36-117-1 record. What makes the A's horrendous showing so remarkable was that Philadelphia had won the American League in pennant in 1910, 1911, 1913 and 1914--and the World Series in three of those seasons. However, the A's were stunningly upset by the Boston Braves in the 1914 World Series. Miffed owner/manager Connie Mack quickly dismantled his superb team and attempted to restock it with castoffs and college hopefuls. The A's finished last seven years in a row before rebuilding their dynasty in the late 1920s. The 1916 Athletics are of particular interest to me because I'm a co-author of the book shown here: A's Bad As It Gets. (Blame my publisher for the punny title.) It is now available through McFarland Publishers or it can be purchased online via Amazon. Trust me: if you're a baseball fan you'll enjoy it! After the huge number of posts I've made on this website over the years (nearly 2,700) for everyone's enjoyment, I figure I'm entitled to one shameless, self-promoting commercial announcement.
Tags: baseball  1916  Philadelphia  Athletics 
Added: 16th March 2014
Views: 1089
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Posted By: Lava1964
Funny Boston Bruins Promo This short promo is probably the best of the bunch produced by the Boston Bruins in 2008. It gives clear guidance that Bruins fans should not date Montreal fans.
Tags: Boston  Bruins  NHL  hockey 
Added: 27th April 2014
Views: 884
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cocoanut Grove Fire 1942 On Saturday, November 28, 1942 Boston's Cocoanut Grove nightclub was the site of one of the deadliest fires in American history. The night spot was owned by Barney Welansky who had connections to both the mayor and organized crime. It was quaintly reminiscent of Rick's Cafe Americain in the movie Casablanca--but its highly flammable tropical-style furniture and decorations made it a firetrap. There were more than 1,000 people inside although the legal capacity was 460. The fire is believed to have started when a busboy attempted to replace a light bulb in the dimly lit Melody Lounge in the lower level. He struck a match to help him see. Shortly thereafter patrons saw the palm fronds from a nearby artificial tree ignite. The fire rapidly spread along the walls and ceiling. Within five minutes the entire nightclub was ablaze. Many patrons attempted to exit through the revolving main door which quickly became jammed. Some secondary doors had been welded shut to prevent customers from leaving without paying their tabs. Other doors swung inward and made escape nearly impossible due to the crush of the crowd. All told, 492 people perished. Among the fatalities were Cowboy movie star Buck Jones and a couple who had been married earlier that same day. Welansky was convicted on multiple counts of involuntary manslaughter.
Tags: Cocoanut  Grove  Fire  1942 
Added: 29th September 2009
Views: 3688
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Posted By: Lava1964
Willard Hershberger - Baseball Suicide The only active major league baseball player to commit suicide during a season was Cincinnati Reds' catcher Willard Hershberger. The 30-year-old Hershberger was in his third season as a backup catcher for the Reds. Often moody, Hershberger was a loner who was extremely critical of his own play. When regular Reds' catcher Ernie Lombardi was injured during the 1940 season, Hershberger took over, batting a very respectable .309 and playing well defensively. On July 31, though, the Reds blew a late lead against the New York Giants at the Polo Grounds. Hershberger blamed himself for the loss and became sullen. The Reds then travelled to Boston where they lost both games of a doubleheader to a weak Boston Bees team on August 2. Afterwards, Hershberger met with Reds' manager Bill McKechnie to discuss personal problems. The next day, when Hershberger failed to appear at the ballpark, a search of his Boston hotel room found Hershberger dead in a pool of his own blood. He had slit his wrists with a razor. (There was a history of suicide in the family: Hershberger's father had killed himself in 1926.) Manager McKechnie never elaborated on the personal issues he had discussed with his troubled catcher.
Tags: Willard  Hershberger  baseball  suicide 
Added: 1st October 2009
Views: 3301
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Posted By: Lava1964
United States Football League Sports history has shown that it is very difficult for nascent pro sports leagues to challenge old, established ones. Nevertheless, there are entrepreneurs always willing to try. From 1983 through 1985 the United States Football League existed as a spring/summer league. The USFL was the brainchild of David Dixon, a New Orleans antique dealer. In 1980, Dixon commissioned a study by Frank Magid Associates that found promising results for a spring and summer football league. He'd also formed a blueprint for the prospective league's operations, which included early television exposure, heavy promotion in home markets, and owners willing to absorb years of losses—-which he felt would be inevitable until the league found its feet. The USFL secured television contracts from both ABC and ESPN. The league also was able to sign several collegiate stars--most notably Herschel Walker who was still an underclassman. Mostly, however, the public responded with yawns. Television ratings and overall attendance were below expectations. Teams often spent far more than the proposed $1.8 million salary cap to land big-name players. In three seasons, 23 different teams played under the USFL banner. The Breakers were a typical USFL franchise, operating in three different cities (Boston, New Orleans, and Portland) over the three years. Teams typically wallowed in debt. The San Antonio Gunslingers were in such dire straits that some players, whose pay checks had bounced, were exchanging their complimentary game tickets for food and were boarding at the homes of sympathetic fans. The USFL was dealt its death blow in a courtroom in 1986 when it won an antitrust lawsuit versus the National Football League--but the jury awarded the USFL only $3 in damages. Still, some USFL innovations were evenutally adopted by the NFL. These included the two-point conversion, the use of instant replay to assist officials, and a salary cap.
Tags: USFL  football 
Added: 21st November 2009
Views: 1340
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gerry Cheevers One of hockey's most identifiable goalie masks belonged to Gerry Cheevers of the Boston Bruins. His make-believe 'stitches' were a statement: They represented the real stitches that would have scarred Cheevers' face had he not worn the mask. Every time a puck struck Cheevers' mask, Boston's trainer Frosty Forrestall would add another row of stitches to it.
Tags: Gerry  Cheevers  hockey  goalie  mask 
Added: 3rd March 2010
Views: 1364
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bryce Florie Injury On September 8, 2000, in a game Red-Sox Yankees televised by ESPN, Boston pitcher Bryce Florie was hit in the face with a line drive. He suffered several fractures and damaged vision. The injury ended his 2000 season. He pitched only seven games for Boston in 2001 before he was released. He lingered in the low minor leagues until 2007.
Tags: baseball  Bryce  Florie  injury 
Added: 25th April 2010
Views: 3064
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fenway Park 1942 This is a photo of Boston's venerable Fenway Park taken during the 1942 season. The Green Monster wasn't so green when it was plastered with advertising.
Tags: baseball  Fenway  Park 
Added: 4th May 2010
Views: 1821
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Kraut Line During the 1930s and 1940s, the Boston Bruins' offense was geared around its famous 'Kraut Line' of Bobby Bauer, Milt Schmidt and Woody Dumart. All three hailed from Kitchener, Ontario which had (and still has) a large German population. The line helped Boston win Stanley Cups in both 1939 and 1941. During the Second World War, the threesome's moniker was changed to 'the Kitchener Kids' because, as hockey historian Brian McFarlane noted with understatement, 'Things German weren't too popular.'
Tags: hockey  Kraut  Line  Boston  Bruins 
Added: 19th May 2010
Views: 2490
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Posted By: Lava1964

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