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Winston Churchill Fight Them On The Beaches Speech In June 1940 German forces occupied virtually all of western Europe. France and Belgium were on the verge of total collapse. The British Expeditionary Force had been evacuated from the beaches of Dunkirk to fight another day. England stood alone against mighty Nazi Germany. Winston Churchill, who had been British prime minister for just a month, broadcast this famous, defiant oration. Listen as one of the great figures of the 20th century delivers probably his most famous speech of the Second World War era. Churchill's 'fight them on the beaches' speech sets the tone of the war for the entire British Empire.
Tags: Winston  Churchill  speech 
Added: 27th November 2007
Views: 1818
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Posted By: Lava1964
1920 Olympic Games Poster This is a poster advertising the 1920 Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium. Antwerp was awarded the 1920 Olympics largely for sentimental reasons. It had been the first war-ravaged country during the Great War. (It is interesting to note that Germany was not invited to participate in these Olympics.) Of all the official posters made for the modern Olympic Games since they were revived in 1896, this one appeals to me the most.
Tags: 1920  Olympic  Games  poster 
Added: 29th November 2007
Views: 1560
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Posted By: Lava1964
1924 Olympic Hockey Tournament The inaugural Winter Olympic Games in Chamonix, France in 1924 featured a hockey tournament that was far from competitive. The two North American teams handily crushed all European opposition. The eight-team event had Canada in one four-team pool and the United States in the other. The Canadians, comprised of amateur players solely from Toronto, won their first three games by ridiculous scores of 30-0, 33-0, and 22-0 versus Czecholslovakia, Switzerland, and Sweden respectively. The Americans were having an equally easy time vanquishing Belgium, France and Great Britain by a combined score of 65-0. In the semifinals Canada thumped Great Britain 19-2 while the United States whipped Sweden 20-0. Canada beat the US 6-1 in the gold-medal match. None of the champion Canadians ever played pro hockey. Canada's performance was so daunting that at the 1928 Winter Olympics, the Canadians were awarded an automatic bye to the finals while the other 10 teams battled each other to see which nation would get the honor of being pummelled. Switzerland emerged from the pack as the challenger--and promptly lost 11-0 to a team wholly comprised of students from the University of Toronto.
Tags: 1924  Olympic  ice  hockey  tourney 
Added: 4th February 2014
Views: 639
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Posted By: Lava1964
Suzanne Lenglen France's Suzanne Lenglen was pretty much invincible in women's tennis in the 1920s, losing only one match of significance in singles from 1914 through 1926. She ruled the sport when the major tournaments were amatuer events only. This photo of Lenglen was taken at the 1920 Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium. Considered a sex symbol in her heyday, Lenglen turned professional after 1926 and played a series of exhibition matches in the United States that didn't draw very good crowds because Lenglen so outclassed her competition. She died of leukemia in 1938 when she was only 39 years old.
Tags: Suzanne  Lenglen  tennis 
Added: 20th February 2008
Views: 985
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Posted By: Lava1964
Doomed Figure Skater Laurence Owen Sixteen-year-old Laurence Owen was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated on February 13, 1961. Two days later she and the entire U.S. figure skating team perished when their Boeing 707 crashed near Brussels, Belgium. None of the 72 persons on board survived. The team was en route to Prague, Czechoslovakia for the world championships. Owen was the reigning U.S. and North American champion. Among those also killed were Owen's mother, Maribel, and her sister, also named Maribel.
Tags: Laurence  Owen  figure  skater  plane  crash 
Added: 10th April 2009
Views: 4183
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Posted By: Lava1964
Laurence Owen US Figure Skating Champion 1961 Earlier I posted the Sports Illustrated cover photo of 16-year-old Laurence Owen. Here she is winning the 1961 U.S. championship in Colorado Springs on January 25, 1961--three weeks before she (and the rest of the U.S. team) were killed in a plane crash in Belgium. This was the first time the U.S. Figure Skating Championships were broadcast on network television. (Miss Owen's first name is misspelled on the TV graphic.) Yes, that is the familiar voice of Dick Button providing the commentary--back in 1961!
Tags: Laurence  Owen  figure  skater 
Added: 10th April 2009
Views: 1452
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Posted By: Lava1964
Do Re Mi - Belgian Railroad Station Naomi alerted me to this terrific video a couple of weeks ago. It's too good not to share with everyone. At 8 a.m. on Monday, March 23, 2009, this joyful, creative stunt was staged at Antwerp, Belgium's Central Station. It was designed to publicize a cast search for The Sound of Music. Watch as dozens of dancers (in regular street clothes) emerge from the crowd and begin their surprise show! This is really uplifting. I wish I had been there!
Tags: Do  Re  Mi  Belgium 
Added: 13th June 2009
Views: 1105
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Crucified Soldier One enduring controversy about the First World War is a grisly tale of a Canadian soldier who was allegedly found crucified to a wall of a barn in Belgium. The unsettling incident is said to have happened following the terrible Second Battle of Ypres in April 1915 where the Germans first used poison gas. Rumors abounded that the enraged Canadians were not too interested in capturing German prisoners. According to the story, the Germans retaliated by crucifying a random Canadian prisoner. According to reports form three Canadian soldiers, they witnessed a comrade, Sgt. Harry Band, impaled on a wall by five German bayonets. The tale, which spread quickly around the world through newspaper stories, was dismissed by many people as wartime propaganda. Depicting this event is this 32-inch bronze scultpure titled Canada's Golgotha. It was removed from a post-war art exhibit after formal complaints by the Germans who insisted the story was bogus. As late as 1989 the sculpture was hidden from public view. In 2002, a war researcher uncovered letters from supposed witnesses to the event that were written to Band's sister. These letters attest that the awful story was true. Band's body was never recovered. He is still listed among the missing in action.
Tags: First  World  War  crucified  soldier 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 2394
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Posted By: Lava1964
Poppy - Symbol of Remembrance When Americans visit Canada in the the first days of November, they are often puzzled by the poppies Canadians wear on their jackets. The poppy is a symbol of remembrance that dates to the First World War. It is based upon a famous poem, In Flanders Fields. It was written by a Canadian battlefield surgeon John McCrae, who was in charge of an aid station in Belgium in 1915. McCrae wrote the verse after a close friend of his was killed by an artillery shell. (McCrae himself did not survive the war; he died of meningitis in 1918.) The full poem is below in the comments section. A good many Canadians know it by heart.
Tags: Remembrance  Day  Poppy 
Added: 11th November 2009
Views: 896
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Posted By: Lava1964
1924 Canadian Olympic Hockey Team This is a photo of Canada's first Olympic hockey team. At the inaugural Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France in 1924, Canada sent a local amateur team (the Toronto Granites) to compete against the world's best. The results were horribly lopsided, to say the least: Playing three games in three days, Canada overwhelmed their Pool 'A' opponents. The Canadians thumped Czechoslovakia 30-0, Sweden 22-0, and Switzerland 33-0. In the medal round, Canada beat Great Britain 19-2 and the United States 6-1 to capture the gold medals. (Entering that final game, the Americans had outscored Belgium, France, Great Britain and Sweden by an aggregate score of 72-0.) Overall, Canada outscored its five opponents 110-3. Harry Watson scored 37 of Canada's goals. The Canadians' victory was so decisive that Canada was awarded an automatic bye into the final round at the next Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland in 1928. None of the Canadians ever played pro hockey.
Tags: hockey  Olympics  Canada 
Added: 4th March 2010
Views: 953
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Posted By: Lava1964

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