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How Soon Is Too Soon I LOVE this vintage Cola ad!! The copy says: "Laboratory tests over the last few years have proven that babies who start drinking soda during that early formative period have a much higher chance of gaining acceptance and 'fitting in' during those awkward pre-teen and teen years."
Tags: vintage  cola  ad 
Added: 9th October 2007
Views: 3881
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Posted By: Teresa
Hyundai Ad That Needs No Translation Hyundai commercial for those awkward moments..
Tags: hyundai  commercials  humor 
Added: 4th November 2007
Views: 1141
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Posted By: Naomi
Lucy and Desi The Long Long Trailer I've looked all over for this scene and finally found it. Made in 1954, Nicky (Arnaz) and Tacy Collini (Ball) are going to be married. Nicky wants to save up money for a house, but Tacy dreams of starting off with their own home on wheels...a trailer. After the two are hitched, they hitch up their trailer and begin their honeymoon. The humor comes from several disastrous adventures they have while traveling, including Tacy's awkward attempt to cook dinner in a moving trailer, and a cliffhanging ride through the mountains that nearly destroys their marriage. Lucy was perfect as usual, and I die laughing every time I watch this.
Tags: Lucille  Ball  Desi  Arnaz  Long  Long  Trailer 
Added: 20th December 2007
Views: 2419
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Posted By: Naomi
Coogan Law After co-starring in Charlie Chaplin's film The Kid (1921), Jackie Coogan was one of America's first major child stars. Unfortunately, because there was no precedent for a child actor earning thousands of dollars, there were no laws to protect Coogan's financial interests. At the time, minors had absolutely no legal claims to their earnings--every penny belonged to one's parents. Coogan found this out the hard way, when, at age 21 in 1935, he discovered his earnings were almost all gone. Coogan was then put in the awkward position of having to sue his mother and his former agent to recover a small portion of wht he had earned. In response, Congress passed the Coogan Law to protect future child actors' earnings. Unfortunately, the original law contained too many loopholes, renedering it virtually ineffective. Revised versions over the years have been far more effective in protecting the earnings of minors.
Tags: Jackie  Coogan  law 
Added: 6th August 2008
Views: 793
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jerry Lewis Disses an Imitator This is one of the most awkward showbiz clips you'll ever see: From a 1994 show in Brooklyn, Jerry Lewis allows an audience member to come onstage to do a Jerry Lewis imitation. Less than two seconds into the interloper's act, Jerry snaps and gives the guy the boot. I'm torn: Who looks worse here? Is it the intruder or Jerry?
Tags: Jerry  Lewis  imitator 
Added: 30th October 2008
Views: 1570
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jayne Mansfield That Makes It From the 1966 movie Las Vegas Hillbillies. This is kind of awkward to watch.
Tags: Jayne  Mansfield  That  Makes  It  Las  Vegas  Hillibillies  Musical 
Added: 10th June 2009
Views: 1269
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Posted By: Carl1957
Judge Crater Disappearance 1930 Joseph Force Crater was an associate judge of the New York Supreme Court. On August 6, 1930, the 41-year-old Crater was in New York City, ostensibly on business, while his wife vacationed without him in Maine. While in New York, Crater spent time with his young showgirl mistress, Sally Lou Ritz. Crater dined with Ritz and a lawyer friend, then they attended a play. When the show ended, Crater's companions got into a taxi and watched Crater walk away...never to be seen again. After several days it was obvious to the judge's wife and colleagues that something was terribly amiss--especially when court reconvened on August 25 with Crater still absent. An investigation was launched. When the story hit the newspapers, a nationwide manhunt began. Naturally, foul play was suspected. On the morning of his disappearance, Crater's assistant had helped the judge cash two checks totaling more than $5,100. The money was put into two locked briefcases and taken to the judge's apartment. Speculation ran along the lines of Crater paying blackmail money. A grand jury trial followed, yielding 975 pages of testimony. It implicated Crater in shady real estate and financial deals, but the authorities had no success in finding any trace of the judge. (Sally Lou Ritz escaped much of the publicity--but not the gossip--when she herself vanished, never to be seen again.) Crater's wife did not return to her New York City apartment until January 31, 1931--where she found a manila envelope addressed to her in the judge's handwriting. It contained his will, $6,619 in cash, several checks, stocks, bonds, life insurance policies, and a hurriedly penned three-page personal note. The envelope had apparently been placed there after the police had searched the apartment. (Three checks were dated August 30--more than three weeks after the judge had vanished!) For several decades the term 'pulling a Judge Crater' was slang for vanishing or leaving an awkward situation discreetly. On August 19, 2005, authorities announced they had obtained a letter written by Stella Ferrucci-Good, who had recently died at age 91. The missive indicated that Judge Crater had been murdered by her late husband, a policeman, and a cab driver friend. Supposedly a skeleton found under the boardwalk at Coney Island in the 1950s was Crater's. An aquarium now occupies the site. The unidentified bones were interred in a mass grave on Hart Island, the usual spot where unclaimed corpses were commonly buried in unmarked plots. However, Ferrucci-Good's story has a major hole: no record exists of a body ever being found under the Coney Island boardwalk.
Tags: Judge  Crater  disappearance 
Added: 16th September 2009
Views: 1619
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Posted By: Lava1964
Robert Stanfield Fumble Photo Think liberal media bias is only common to American politics? Think again! Robert Stanfield is often referred to by Canada's political right as 'the greatest prime minister Canada never had.' On May 30, 1974, during the Canadian federal election campaign, photographer Doug Ball captured his most famous image--a shot of Conservative candidate Robert Stanfield dropping a football during a rest stop at North Bay, Ontario. '[Stanfield was] knock-kneed, hands clasped awkwardly, grimacing as a football slipped between his bony fingers,' recalled Ball. It was the defining photo of Stanfield’s political career. That afternoon, Stanfield aide Brad Chapman brought out a football for some exercise, and Ball shot 36 pictures of Stanfield throwing, catching and--just once--awkwardly fumbling the football. In a glaring example of ‘image politics’ all too common in Canada, the Toronto Globe and Mail ran the unflattering picture on its front page under the headline, 'A political fumble?' No Canadian newspaper ran any of the 35 available photos of Stanfield catching the ball. The photo may have cost him the election, but Stanfield never held any grudges about the photo, which won Ball a national newspaper award. He autographed a copy it for Ball more than a decade later, signing, ‘To Doug: I should’ve taken off my tie. Robert Stanfield.’
Tags: media  bias  Robert  Stanfield  football  fumble  photo 
Added: 18th September 2010
Views: 2996
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Posted By: Lava1964
Saturday Night Live With Howard Cosell Saturday Night Live with Howard Cosell was a dreadful variety program that ran on ABC from September 1975 to January 1976. It, of course, was hosted by sports announcer Howard Cosell and produced by Roone Arledge of Monday Night Football fame. It was later remembered by its director Don Mischer as 'one of the greatest disasters in the history of television,' largely due to Cosell and Arledge being unfamiliar with comedy and variety programming. Coincidentally, that same year NBC began airing a late-night comedy show titled Saturday Night. The shows did not directly compete. (Cosell's program aired at 8 p.m. whereas NBC's show aired at 11:30 p.m.) Cosell's show featured Bill Murray, Brian Doyle-Murray, and Christopher Guest as regular comedy performers dubbed 'The Prime Time Players.' In response, the NBC show called its regular performers 'the Not-Ready-For-Prime-Time Players.' Ironically, all three of the original Prime Time Players eventually joined the NBC show. The premiere episode featured celebrity guests Frank Sinatra, Shirley Bassey, Paul Anka, Siegfried and Roy, the cast of the Broadway version of The Wiz, Jimmy Connors, John Denver and the Bay City Rollers (whom Cosell dubbed 'the next British phenomenon'). The show was often hectic and unprepared. In one instance, Arledge learned that Lionel Hampton was in New York City and invited the musician to appear just an hour before airtime. The show fared poorly among critics and audiences alike, with TV Guide calling it 'dead on arrival, with a cringingly awkward host.' Alan King, the show's 'executive in charge of comedy,' admitted it was difficult to turn Cosell into a variety show host, saying Cosell 'made Ed Sullivan look like Buster Keaton.' Saturday Night Live with Howard Cosell was canceled on January 17, 1976, after only 18 episodes. A year later, in 1977, NBC's Saturday Night was renamed Saturday Night Live.
Tags: Saturday  Night  Live  Howard  Cosell  variety  TV 
Added: 17th December 2010
Views: 2251
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Posted By: Lava1964
Buckwheat Hoax 1990 ABC News found itself in an embarrassing position in 1990. Acting on a viewer's tip, 20/20, ABC's weekly news magazine, aired a "Where are they now?" segment about former Our Gang member Buckwheat. The story claimed that Buckwheat, whose real name was Bill English, was modestly employed as a grocery bagger at a Tempe, AZ supermarket. Immediately following the broadcast, dozens of Our Gang fans called ABC to tell the network they had been duped by an imposter. The real Buckwheat was named Billie Thomas--and he had died of a heart attack in 1980. Among the whistle-blowers was Our Gang alumnus Spanky McFarland who had worked alongside Thomas from 1934 until 1942. (Buckwheat stayed with the series until its conclusion in 1944.) Shortly after the hoax was exposed, a reporter from A Current Event interviewed McFarland via satellite from his home in Dallas while simultaneously interviewing English via satellite from Tempe. English came across as mumbling, evasive, incoherent, and thoroughly unconvincing. Moreover, English claimed to be the "first Buckwheat"--even though there was only one. The fallout of the debacle was that Lynn Murray, the producer of the 20/20 segment, was fired for doing inadequate research. Thomas's son sued ABC for damages. Hugh Downs issued an on-air apology on the following 20/20 broadcast. ABC News released a half-hearted, semi-apologetic media statement describing the situation as awkward "because English truly believes he is Buckwheat." English went to his grave in November 1994 still maintaining he was Buckwheat.
Tags: Buckwheat  hoax  Our  Gang  ABC  20/20 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 2189
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Posted By: Lava1964

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