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Battle of the Network Stars 1976 Tags: Battle  of  the  Network  Stars  1976  Howard  Cosell  Gabe  Kaplan  Lynda  Carter  Farrah  Fawcett    retro  tv    classic  tv  70s  vintage  retro 
Added: 29th April 2011
Views: 3017
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Posted By: Cliffy
Boston Bruins - 1972 Stanley Cup Champs I posted this on the CBC News website in Canada following the Boston Bruins' Stanley Cup championship on June 15, 2011. It got such a wonderful response that I thought I'd share it here too: It had been 14,279 days since captain Johnny Bucyk hoisted the Boston Bruins' last Stanley Cup on May 11, 1972. To put things in perspective... Richard Nixon was in the White House. America still had combat troops in Vietnam. If you bought a quarter's worth of candy, you could get sick eating it all. Pitchers still batted in the American League. There was no such thing as rap music or punk rock. Nobody considered the possibility of terrorist attacks at the Olympics. The NHL had 14 teams. Few players wore helmets. Some goalies didn't wear masks. Nobody seriously thought hockey players from the USSR were good. There were hardly any McDonald's Restaurants in Canada. There were very few Tim Hortons either. Archie Bunker was in his heyday. Television sets had rabbit ears. Nobody thought the world was in peril from global warming or climate change or whatever they're calling it this week. Lotteries were illegal in Canada. Arthur Godfrey Time had still been on the radio two weeks earlier. Calculators could perform four functions and cost $179. Most people had rotary telephones. Forget about DVD players--VCRs didn't exist. The idea of bottled water would have been laughable. Computers were enormous things that occupied entire rooms and did simple calculations using punch cards. Hardware meant hammers and wrenches. Software didn't mean anything. People still sent telegrams. Life Magazine was still around. Canada still had the death penalty. O.J. Simpson was a hero. The Lord's Prayer was recited in public schools. Nobody thought it was wrong. A new car cost $2500. Hockey cards were a dime a pack--and they came with pink bubble gum covered in powdered sugar. Bobby Orr was the greatest player in the NHL. (Thirty-nine years later he's still the greatest of all time.).
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  1972  Stanley  Cup 
Added: 16th June 2011
Views: 3239
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gary US Bonds - Quarter To Three Tags: Gary  US  Bonds  -  Quarter  To  Three,  Go-Go  Girls,  Early  Rock  and  Roll,  60 
Added: 22nd June 2011
Views: 1759
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Posted By: pfc
Oakland As Mustache Gang 1972 Nineteenth-century baseball players regularly sported mustaches. After the turn of the twentieth century, though, most ballplayers were clean shaven. By 1914 only one MLB player--Wally Schang--had facial hair. For the next 58 years, there were no mustachioed players in MLB. In 1972 Reggie Jackson showed up for the Oakland A's spring training camp with a mustache. A's owner Charlie Finley and manager Dick Williams both hated it. The more they insisted that Jackson shave it off, the more defiant he became. Finley then attempted some reverse psychology: He figured if he encouraged other A's players to grow mustaches, Jackson's sense of individuality would be defeated and he'd voluntarily shave his mustache. The plan backfired. After several players starting growing mustaches, Finley started to like the new look of his team and the publicity that came with it. He completely switched gears and offered a $300 bonus to anyone who had grown a mustache by Father's Day. In fact, Finley began pressuring his players to have mustaches. To a man, everyone on the A's roster agreed--including ultra-conservative manager Williams. The A’s long-haired, mustachioed look would stamp them with an identity starkly different from the rest of Major League Baseball. Relief pitcher Rollie Fingers (shown here) became the most noteworthy Oakland player with a mustache. His agreement to sport stylish facial hair was included in his contract--along with a $100 annual stipend for mustache wax.
Tags: baseball  Oakland  A 
Added: 27th July 2011
Views: 7956
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Posted By: Lava1964
Buckwheat Hoax 1990 ABC News found itself in an embarrassing position in 1990. Acting on a viewer's tip, 20/20, ABC's weekly news magazine, aired a "Where are they now?" segment about former Our Gang member Buckwheat. The story claimed that Buckwheat, whose real name was Bill English, was modestly employed as a grocery bagger at a Tempe, AZ supermarket. Immediately following the broadcast, dozens of Our Gang fans called ABC to tell the network they had been duped by an imposter. The real Buckwheat was named Billie Thomas--and he had died of a heart attack in 1980. Among the whistle-blowers was Our Gang alumnus Spanky McFarland who had worked alongside Thomas from 1934 until 1942. (Buckwheat stayed with the series until its conclusion in 1944.) Shortly after the hoax was exposed, a reporter from A Current Event interviewed McFarland via satellite from his home in Dallas while simultaneously interviewing English via satellite from Tempe. English came across as mumbling, evasive, incoherent, and thoroughly unconvincing. Moreover, English claimed to be the "first Buckwheat"--even though there was only one. The fallout of the debacle was that Lynn Murray, the producer of the 20/20 segment, was fired for doing inadequate research. Thomas's son sued ABC for damages. Hugh Downs issued an on-air apology on the following 20/20 broadcast. ABC News released a half-hearted, semi-apologetic media statement describing the situation as awkward "because English truly believes he is Buckwheat." English went to his grave in November 1994 still maintaining he was Buckwheat.
Tags: Buckwheat  hoax  Our  Gang  ABC  20/20 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 2895
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Posted By: Lava1964
1992 Little League World Series Scandal In 1992 the Little League baseball team representing Zamboanga City, Philippines won its way through national trials and the Far East series. After brushing aside the competition at Williamsport, PA, the team was crowned the champion of the 46th Little League World Series. Not long afterward, though, the team was stripped of its title after Filipino journalists revealed the team had used ineligible players who did not meet either age or residency requirements. In 1992 the LLWS introduced a new format--round-robins within both the American and International pools. Zamboanga City thumped Kaiserslauten, Germany, then Valleyfield, Quebec to clinch a berth in the International final. They lost a meaningless game to Epyguerrerro, Dominican Republic, but beat them 5-1 when it counted in the International final. The LLWS championship game, on August 29, against Long Beach, California, was a blowout, with Zamboanga City scoring seven runs in the first inning and cruising to an easy 15-4 win. The team was hailed as heroes in the Philippines. Filipino president Fidel V. Ramos awarded the players' families a million pesos. Long Beach head coach Jeff Burroughs remarked that one Filipino pitcher, Roberto Placious, had the poise of a high school or college pitcher. He may have been right! A few days after Zamboanga City's victory, journalist Al Mendoza of the Philippine Daily Inquirer began a series of stories suggesting that some players were ineligible for the LLWS. In response to this allegation, Little League headquarters faxed administrator Armando Andaya questions regarding the players' ages, birth certificates, residence--and a specific question regarding pitcher Ian Tolentino's participation in a tournament in 1990 (suggesting this would have made him overage in 1992). Andaya admitted to violating rules on district representation. Eight players were from outside the Zamboanga City area--some came from as far away as Luzon and were unable to speak Chabacano, the language most commonly spoken in Zamboanga. Little League Baseball promptly stripped Zamboanga City of its title. Under Little League rules at the time, when a team was found to have used an ineligible player, it forfeited only its most recent game. Since the revelation was made after the championship game, that game was declared a 6-0 forfeit victory for Long Beach--which was awarded the LLWS title. The exposed players and parents remained defiant, and accused Little League Baseball of denying them due process. Many Filipinos were outraged at what they saw as a betrayal by Mendoza. (He was given the key to the city of Long Beach!) Nevertheless, fellow Inquirer journalist Armand N. Nocum conducted a further investigation and found that even the six true Zamboangueños were overage--one was at least 15--and thus ineligible. It was further discovered the fraud was based upon the ineligible players assuming the identities of eligible players who had represented the city at the national championships. In some cases, even the parents of the ineligible players assumed false identities to maintain the appearance of propriety. Apparently no lesson was learned by the Zamboanga City Little League. The very next year its team was disqualified from the Filipino national championship tournament in another overage-player scandal.
Tags: cheating  Little  League  Baseball  scandal  Philippines 
Added: 28th August 2011
Views: 4368
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Posted By: Lava1964
26-Inning MLB Game - 1920 The longest game (by innings) in Major League Baseball's long history was a 26-inning, 1-1 tie. It was a National League game between the Boston Braves and Brooklyn Robins played at Braves Field in Boston on May 1, 1920. Amazingly, both starting pitchers--Brooklyn's Leon Cadore and Boston's Joe Oeschger--went the distance. Since night baseball didn't begin in MLB until 1935, the game was stopped by plate umpire Barry McCormick due to impending darkness. It had to be replayed in its entirety, but all the stats from the 26-inning tie counted. Remarkably, by modern standards, the game took only 3 hours and 50 minutes to play. It had started at 3:00 p.m., as was the custom in those days, and ended at 6:50 p.m. Several players unsuccessfully lobbied umpire McCormick to extend the game one more inning so they could say they played the equivalent of three nine-inning games. The press box at Braves Field did not have electric lights so reporters and telegraphers had to submit their accounts of the record-setting game using candlelight. Some trivia from the game: The score had been tied 1-1 since the sixth inning. The attendance was about 3,500. Cadore faced 95 Boston batters. Oeschger pitched to a mere 90 Robins, but his 21 consecutive scoreless innings established a record. Braves' first baseman Walter Holke recorded the ridiculous total of 43 putouts. Boston's second baseman, Charlie Pick, set a record too, but not a positive one: His one-game total of 11 official at-bats without a hit has never been matched. Years later Cadore remembered the aftereffects of the game. "My arm stiffened. I couldn't raise it to comb my hair for three days," he said. "After seven days of rest I was back taking my regular turn. I never had a sore arm before or after the game. I suppose the nervous energy of trying to win the game gave me the strength to keep me going."
Tags: baseball  MLB  longest  game  26  innings  Braves  Robins 
Added: 13th September 2011
Views: 3177
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Posted By: Lava1964
USS Maine Baseball Team The American battleship USS Maine mysteriously exploded in Havana Harbor on February 15, 1898. About three-quarters of the ship's crew perished. Only 16 sailors onboard were completely uninjured. Accusations of sabotage led to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War. (Evidence from modern investigations of the wreck suggests that a spontaneous internal explosion of coal near the ship's magazine likely caused the explosion--not sabotage.) Be that as it may, here is a photo of the USS Maine's baseball team. The man standing at the top left, J.H. Bloomer, was the only team member to survive the explosion.
Tags: USS  Maine  baseball  team 
Added: 18th September 2011
Views: 1949
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Posted By: Lava1964
1901 - 20th Century Begins Remember the dispute over when the twenty-first century would begin? Was the correct date January 1, 2000 or January 1, 2001? Guess what? The same illogical dispute over when the twentieth century would begin was underway as the year 1900 approached. "When will the twentieth century start? It will begin on January 1, 1901, of course--not January 1, 1900." This factoid was front page news in the White River Journal of Kent, WA on the first day of 1900. Said the newspaper's editorial, "Throughout Christendom there has been a voluminous, fierce discussion as to when the new century begins -- whether it is this New Years [January 1, 1900] or next. The majority of the people of this country, as represented by publications and speakers, are agreed with the great majority elsewhere that the century does not begin until 1901. It seems plain that this is a logical deduction, for the Christian era started with the year 1, thereby being twelve months ahead on its first New Years. If the era had started with the year 0 then we would properly celebrate the new century this year. To avoid just such complications in the numerals of tickets all railroads start the numbering with 0 instead of with 1."
Tags: calendar  20th  century  dispute 
Added: 26th December 2011
Views: 1252
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Posted By: Lava1964
1932 NFL Championship Game One of the most important games in the history of the National Football League was the 1932 NFL Championship Game. It provided many firsts: Most significantly it was the NFL's first championship game--and it was the first NFL game to be played indoors. Prior to 1933 there was no official league championship game. The league title went to the team with the best record--which was often disputed because teams did not play anything resembling a balanced schedule. In 1932, both the Chicago Bears and Portsmouth (OH) Spartans had six wins and a loss. By rule, tie games were ignored in the standings. Portsmouth had four ties and the Bears had six! During the regular season, both games between the Bears and Spartans had ended in ties. With the NFL's blessings, the Bears and Spartans agreed to play a one-game tie-breaker at Chicago's Wrigley Field on December 18. However, a forecast of a blizzard and minus-40-degree temperatures prompted the game to be moved indoors to Chicago Stadium, an arena more suited for hockey than football. Dirt from a recent circus was spread on the arena's concrete floor to form somethin akin to a regular gridiron. The cozy confines forced some playing rules to be revised. Because there were only 80 yards between the goal lines, as soon as a team advanced the ball beyond midfield, it was moved back 20 yards! The goalposts were moved from the endline to the goal line (where they stayed until 1974). Also, because the field was ten yards narrower than usual, before every play from scrimmage the ball was placed between hashmarks ten yards from the sideline. Chicago won the game 9-0, all their points coming in the fourth quarter on a controversial forward-pass touchdown and a safety. (The touchdown play caused the NFL's passing rules to be modernized the following season.) Not long afterward the Spartans moved to Detroit and became the Lions. The game was a huge success and inspired the NFL to split itself into two divisions and hold an annual championship game between the divisional champs. That system determined the NFL champion each year until the Super Bowl era began in 1966.
Tags: football  NFL  1932  Championship 
Added: 14th January 2012
Views: 2739
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Posted By: Lava1964

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