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Great Blizzard of 1888 Snowstorms have paralyzed major cites for as long as North America has had major cities. The most devastating storm was likely the Great Blizzard of 1888 that crippled most of America's major eastern seaboard cities north of Washington, DC and into Canada. What made this blizzard so bad was that it came as a total surprise. In the days leading up to March 12, 1888, there had been unseasonably mild weather. People on the streets of New York City were walking around without overcoats. The "Great White Hurricane," as some folks dubbed it, struck with a fury. Torrential rains began falling, and on March 12 the rain changed to heavy snow, temperatures plunged, and a ferocious wind began. The storm continued unabated for the next 36 hours. Sources vary, but the National Weather Service estimated that 50 inches of snow fell in Connecticut and Massachusetts and 40 inches covered New York and New Jersey. Winds blew up to 48 miles an hour, creating snowdrifts 40 to 50 feet high. The resulting transportation crisis led to the creation of the New York subway, approved in 1894 and begun in 1900. Telegraph and telephone wires snapped, isolating New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington for days. Two hundred ships were grounded, and at least 100 sailors died. Fire stations were immobilized, and property loss from fire alone was estimated at $25 million. Overall, more than 400 storm-related deaths were reported.
Tags: Blizzard  1888 
Added: 24th November 2014
Views: 926
Posted By: Lava1964

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