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George W. Bush -  First Pitch 2001 WS Ceremonial first pitches at baseball games usually don't have a lot of significance, but that was not the case on October 30, 2001. Before Game #3 of the World Series, President George W. Bush was ushered into Yankee Stadium amid enormous security to do the honors at the first major sports event in New York City since the 9/11 terror attacks. Here is the story of what went on behind the scenes.
Tags: baseball  first  pitch  2001  World  Series  President  Bush 
Added: 22nd October 2017
Views: 826
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Posted By: Lava1964
Forgotten Term - College Widow Here's a term that has virtually vanished from the English language: "college widow." Originally it had a very literal meaning. It referred to a youthful widow who sought the company of college men to satisfy her lusty ways. Eventually the term morphed into meaning any older female who 'preyed upon' the willing males at a campus with her irresistible feminine wiles. The term was so common in the 1920s and 1930s that it was the title of both a play and a movie. In the play, a college dean convinces his comely daughter to use her charms to distract a rival school's football team. (What a wonderful example of fatherhood!) Most people today are only familiar with the term from seeing the Marx brothers' 1932 movie Horse Feathers. Few people today realize Horse Feathers is actually a parody of the 1927 silent movie The College Widow. In it Thelma Todd uses her obvious charms to seduce all four Marx brothers as part of a silly plot to steal Huxley College's football plays.
Tags: college  widow  English  term 
Added: 28th October 2017
Views: 907
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stanford Indians From 1930 to 1972 Stanford University's varsity sports teams were known as the Indians. (At the 1971 Rose Bowl game, the cheerleaders were dressed in native costumes for the band's halftime show.) However, pressure by native American groups, who claimed the nickname was demeaning and insensitive to their heritage, caused the University to change it to Cardinals in 1975. (The new name had nothing to do with the bird, but rather the cardinal red color of the uniforms.) The move was quite controversial. For the first few years there was annual pressure to reinstate the Indians name and logo. However, in 1975 Stanford's board of governors declared the disavowal of the Indians nickname to be irrevocable. The singular Cardinal nickname was officially adopted in 1990. Still there are some old fans and alumni who pine for the return of the Indian logo and name.
Tags: Stanford  Indians  nickname 
Added: 2nd December 2017
Views: 705
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Posted By: Lava1964
1966 Notre Dame-MSU 10-10 Tie This is a highlight clip of one of the most eagerly anticipated NCAA football games of all time. It occurred late in the 1966 season on November 19 when the undefeated Fighting Irish of Notre Dame traveled to East Lansing, MI to play the undefeated Michigan State Spartans. The attendance at Spartan Stadium was officially listed as 80,011, but it was likely higher. The well played game finished inconclusively in a 10-10 tie. The game ended somewhat controversially. Notre Dame had the ball at is own 30-yard line with 1:24 to play. They converted a fourth-and-one for a first down but then the Irish conservatively ran out to clock on two plays to preserve the tie. The tie ended Michigan State's 1966 schedule, but Notre Dame still had one more game on its slate--a road game the following Saturday at the Los Angeles Coliseum versus Southern California. Notre Dame easily rolled to a 51-0 win over the Trojans and won the 1966 national championship.
Tags: 1966  NCAA  football  Notre  Dame  Michigan  State  10-10  tie 
Added: 10th December 2017
Views: 993
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Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 972
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Posted By: Lava1964
Russian Coronation Free Beer Riot - 1896 On Tuesday, May 26, 1896, the elaborate coronation of Czar Nicholas II of Russia occurred in Moscow before an enormous crowd of onlookers. The following day, May 27, to celebrate the new emperor's reign, a massive party was scheduled for the general public. It was to be a large festival with free food, beer, and souvenir cups. The site chosen for the party was Khodynka Field outside Moscow, a venue normally used for military exercises. Khodynka was selected as it was the only place near Moscow large enough to hold the enormous number of citizens who would likely attend. Before the food and drink was handed out, rumors spread that there would not be enough for everyone. As a result, much of the crowd stampeded to get their share. Individuals were tripped and trampled upon. Many hapless onlookers suffocated in the dirt of the field. Of the estimated 100,000 people gathered for the party, 1,389 individuals died and roughly another 1,300 were injured. The Khodynka Tragedy, as it came to be known, was seen as an ill omen for the new czar. Furthermore, the Czar was badly advised to attend a ball on the evening of the catastrophe hosted by the French ambassador to Russia. Nicholas privately wished to observe a period of prayer and mourning for the dead, but his advisors and relatives insisted that he would damage critical Russian-French relations if he did not attend the ball. The decision was seen as callous by many Russian peasants who perceived Nicholas to be frivolous and uncaring toward his subjects.
Tags: Russian  history  Czar  Nicholas  coronation  royalty 
Added: 1st July 2018
Views: 1459
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Posted By: Lava1964
Opie the Birdman - Final Scene The first episode of the fourth season of The Andy Griffith Show was Opie the Birdman (which first aired on September 30, 1963). The plot has Opie Taylor accidentally killing a mother bird with his slingshot. Opie decides to atone for his misdeed by taking care of the three baby birds found in the nest. Here is the final scene when Opie sets the birds free. In a 2009 poll, TV Guide ranked Opie the Birdman as the 18th best sitcom episode of all time!
Tags: Opie  The  Birdman  TAGS 
Added: 1st October 2018
Views: 942
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Posted By: Lava1964
Top 20 Greatest Songs 1930-1939 Watch the best hits of 1930-1939 Official Resource: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDRWlUh3LUM Music made for players on the site rocketpayz.com, where you can find review on raging bull mobile casino . More music find out on the official website.
Tags: music 
Added: 13th April 2020
Views: 218
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Posted By: ErinGoulart

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