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Van Cliburn - Moscow 1958 A truly historic classical music performance: In 1958, at the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union hosted an international Tchaikovsky compeition for pianists. It was supposed to showcase the superiority of Soviet culture. To the surprise of the hosts, a 23-year-old Texan named Van Cliburn emerged as the superstar of the event. Cliburn mesmerized the crowds, the television audience, and the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra with his technical and artistic brilliance. Here is the last four minutes of Cliburn's final performance of the event--Rachmaninoff's 3rd Concerto. Look at the reaction from the audience and the orchestra members. The applause lasted for about eight minutes. Everyone knew who the outstanding pianist of the competition was! This created quite a dilemma for the organizers: a Soviet citizen was expected to win--not an American. Soviet Premier Nikita Khruschev was hastily telephoned to make the final decision. To his credit Khruschev settled the matter quickly and fairly: "Was he the best? Yes? Then give him the prize!" Cliburn became a beloved figure in Russia until his death in 2013.
Tags: Van  Cliburn  pianist  1958  Tchaikovsky  competition  Moscow 
Added: 21st January 2014
Views: 1826
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Posted By: Lava1964
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 923
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Posted By: Lava1964
95000 Sing Youll Never Walk Alone One of the most spine-tingling things you'll ever see (and hear) at a sporting venue: 95,000 fans in Melbourne, Australia sing You'll Never Walk Alone just before a friendly soccer match between Liverpool F.C. and Melbourne Victory F.C. in July 2013. The song begins at about 1:59 of this video. Liverpool won the match 2-0.
Tags: Youll  Never  Walk  alone  soccer  Liverpool  Melbourne 
Added: 16th March 2014
Views: 950
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Posted By: Lava1964
Paul McCartney Helps With Beatles Trivia To prepare stagehand Guillermo for Paul McCartney's 2013 appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live, Jimmy quizzes Guillermo on Beatles' song titles. Guillermo gets a little extra help at the end.
Tags: Paul  McCartney  Jimmy  Kimmel 
Added: 25th September 2013
Views: 651
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bonnie Franklin Bonnie Franklin, 'One Day at a Time' star, dies March 1, 2013, 4:14 PM EST NEW YORK (AP) -- Bonnie Franklin, the pert, redheaded actress whom millions came to identify with for her role as divorced mom Ann Romano on the long-running sitcom "One Day at a Time," has died. She died Friday at her home in Los Angeles due to complications from pancreatic cancer, family members said. She was 69. Her family had announced she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in September. Franklin was a veteran stage and television performer before "One Day At a Time" made her a star.
Tags: One  Day  at  a  time  bonnie  franklin   
Added: 3rd March 2013
Views: 864
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Posted By: LPROUD
The Hockey Song Stompin' Tom Connors, who died at age 77 on March 6, 2013, was a folk/country singer who was well loved within Canada but hardly known outside its borders. Connors typically penned and performed songs with a distinctly Canadian theme. His most famous tune, The Hockey Song, first recorded in 1973, is familiarly played during lulls in the action at arenas everywhere in Canada. Feel free to sing along!
Tags: Stompin  Tom  Connors  Hockey  Song 
Added: 7th March 2013
Views: 1231
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bobby Orr Tribute Hockey great Bobby Orr turned 65 on March 20, 2013. (Bobby Orr is 65? How can that be?) Here's a video montage, mostly of Orr's spectacular goals, called by Bruins' announcer Fred Cusick.
Tags: Bobby  Orr  NHL  hockey  tribute 
Added: 20th March 2013
Views: 943
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lets Make A Deal - 1973 This is a full 1973 episode of the syndicated version of the game show Let's Make a Deal. Hosted by "America's top trader, TV's big dealer" Monty Hall, LMAD was fast-paced, goofy and fun. It was quite possibly the first game show to use psychology as its main ploy. Contestants often had to decide whether to keep cash and prizes already accrued or trade them for unknown entities hidden under boxes or behind curtains. The daytime version of LMAD began on NBC in December 1963, moved to ABC in September 1968, and ran until July 1976. In all, more than 3,800 network episodes were produced. Also several syndicated nighttime versions sprang up during Monty Hall's tenure as host and producer. Pretty prize presenter Carol Merrill became famous for her euphonic name. Monty's announcer and assistant Jay Stewart was often involved in presenting "zonks"--worthless gag prizes awarded to contestants who made bad decisions. (As of December 2013, Monty is still with us at age 92. Carol is 73. Sadly, Jay committed suicide in 1989 at age 71.) Check out those 1973 prices and enjoy!
Tags: Lets  Make  a  Deal  1973  episode  game  show 
Added: 18th December 2013
Views: 1314
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Posted By: Lava1964
Frank Bank aka Lumpy Rutherford Dies Fans of the classic sitcom Leave it to Beaver will be saddened to hear of the passing of Frank Bank, one day after his 71st birthday, on April 13, 2013. Bank played the not-too-bright Clarence "Lumpy" Rutherford. In the show's first season Lumpy was an oversized bully who terrorized both Wally and Beaver. Later Lumpy became the inseparable friend of Wally and Eddie Haskell. After Leave it to Beaver went off the air in 1963, Bank went on to become a successful stockbroker. At one point he was a business partner of Jerry Mathers who played Beaver Cleaver.
Tags: Frank  Bank  Lumpy  Rutherford  obituary 
Added: 14th April 2013
Views: 787
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pat Summerall 1930-2013 Pat Summerall, one of the great voices in sports broadcasting, died on April 16, 2013. He would have turned 83 on May 10. A former NFL placekicker, Summerall started broadcasting football for CBS in 1964 and became a play-by-play man in 1974. He is best remembered for his calm, restrained manner in contrast to his excitable longtime booth partner John Madden. Summerall was also a fixture at CBS' coverage of The Masters golf tourney and the U.S. Open Tennis Championships for many years. Once CBS lost its NFL contract in 1993, Summerall and Madden joined Fox's NFL coverage. Sadly, CBS would no longer allow Summerall to cover golf or tennis despite being with the network for nearly 40 years.
Tags: Pat  Summerall  sports  broadcaster  NFL 
Added: 17th April 2013
Views: 543
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Posted By: Lava1964

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