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 Kraft Handi Snacks Commercial 1991 Kraft Handi Snacks Commercial 1991
Tags: Kraft  Handi  Snacks  Commercial  1991 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1091
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
 Scary Stories 3 More Tales To Chill Your Bones 1991 Yes I know part is the 80's but its in the 90s for the fact that Scary Stories 3 : More Tales To Chill Your Bones came out in 1991 and started me on getting this series in the 90's. Some kids can relate to this and did the same? You know it peaked your interest and you had to get the whole set! LOL Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark is a series of three children's books written by Alvin Schwartz and illustrated by Stephen Gammell. The scary stories of the title are pieces of folklore and urban legends collected and adapted by Schwartz. The titles of the books are Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark (1981), More Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark (1984), and Scary Stories 3 : More Tales To Chill Your Bones (1991). The first volume was published in 1981, and the books have subsequently been collected in both a box set and a single volume. There is also an audiobook version of each book, read by George S. Irving. Reprints of the books with new illustrations by Brett Helquist have been announced. This series is listed as being the most challenged series of books from 1990–1999 and seventh most challenged from 2000-2009by the American Library Association for its violence. The surreal and nightmarish illustrations contained within are also a frequently challenged component of the original books. To celebrate the books' 30th anniversary, Scholastic re-released them with new illustrations from Brett Helquist, the illustrator of A Series of Unfortunate Events. This has come under criticism from fans of Gammell's illustrations, citing that they are not as effective or as scary as the originals.
Tags:   Scary  Stories  3  More  Tales  To  Chill  Your  Bones  1991 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1929
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Pop Qwiz Popcorn 1990 1990s Colors included yellow, blue, green, and a mystery bag with a surprise color. I'm not sure how many of you will remember this stuff, but it was just too weird not to mention. Video store chains became especially popular during the early 90s; a fact proven by the insidious amount of Blockbuster commercials strewn into TV breaks at the time. As more and more movie nights were staged from home, popcorn finally shed its "theater treat" stigma for good while sales soared. Those microwaveable bags of kernels became and remain a staple in most households, with several companies competing for the coveted top spot. Yes, there's competition in popcorn. So how do you make one popcorn more attractive than the other? For the most part, it's all the same shit. Covering the packaging with pretty colors and in-your-face fonts only took these companies so far, and while dubious additions like cheddar dust and Cajun red spice helped differentiate the products, General Mills had something else in mind. Something strange. "Pop Qwiz." Perhaps the first and only popcorn marketed exclusively towards children. Thrown under General Mills' "Pop Secret" banner, Pop Qwiz really broke the mold. Junk food with a gimmick is common nowadays, but this stuff was pretty unique in 1991. Basically, it was just regular, buttered popcorn dyed in every color of the rainbow. You had bags of red popcorn, blue popcorn, green, yellow, you name it. That alone was sure to bring in a substantial clientele -- kids'll eat anything that looks odd. Pop Qwiz had more to offer than weird colors, though. While each of the mini-sized bags had correspondently bright colors, the colors of the bags didn't necessarily match the shade of the popcorn within. What was surely just a cost cutting measure was sold to us as a "game" -- it was up to us to guess which popcorn color was in each bag. The point of the game is up for debate, as we got to eat all of the popcorn even if we guessed wrong. Taking things even further, the bags had all sorts of quizzes, puzzles, and other stupid games printed right on 'em. Children always appreciate things tailored specifically for them, and while popcorn wasn't an important victory, we took it with great pride. We had our own popcorn. Tomorrow, the world. You'd have to imagine that some kids would've begged for Pop Qwiz just by passing the colorful box in grocery stores, but the point was really driven home with General Mills' ad campaign. This was crucial for ten trillion reasons, and I swear, I've counted. Okay, how often do you see popcorn advertised during children's programming hours? It's pretty rare, so Pop Qwiz was playing to an audience its competitors never even thought to tackle. Another point: when a kid wants popcorn, words are rarely minced. "I want popcorn." That's all that's ever said. No specific brands are mentioned, no bias towards one particular popcorn is conveyed. Just a simple "I want popcorn." By throwing the "Pop Qwiz" title in our heads, General Mills created a sense of inadvertent brand loyalty. If we wanted popcorn, we asked for popcorn. If we wanted crazy wacky colored popcorn, we asked for Pop Qwiz. And what kid wouldn't always prefer crazy wacky colored popcorn? This was all much more brilliant than it seemed on the surface, and the commercial was a real keeper to boot. I know I focus more on earlier years with these articles, but as I was entering my ugly, lonely teen years during the 90s, I ended up watching a whole lot more television. Alone. This "Pop Qwiz" ad, to me, is just as synonymous with the time as any of the big ones, including that PSA where the Ninja Turtles exposed the dangers of marajuana. It surprises me that the snacks weren't very successful -- I guess the world just wasn't ready to accept, much less eat radioactive green popcorn. Artists are so often unappreciated in own their time, even if they only work in kernels.
Tags: Pop  Qwiz  Popcorn  1990 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 2062
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
The Famous Slimer Ecto Cooler  Commercial 1990s Sorry for the bad video, best I could do till I find a better one. This belongs int he 80's and 90's section, More the 90's why? Cause it was so awesome and sold like crazy. Ecto-Cooler was a product tie-in with the cartoon series The Real Ghostbusters, based on the 1984 live-action film, Ghostbusters. Hi-C struck a deal in 1987 to promote the series by developing a drink. Expected to last only as long as the series, the drink was successful beyond expectations and continued after the series' 1991 cancellation to be produced for more than a decade. The Ecto-Cooler box featured The Real Ghostbusters character Slimer, as did the commercials. Slimer left the box sometime around 1997, but Minute Maid did not discontinue the product until 2001, at which point it was renamed Shoutin' Orange Tangergreen. Slimer was replaced on the packaging by a similar-looking blob of lips. The product was still noted as ecto cool on many store receipts. In 2006, Shoutin' Orange Tangergreen was renamed Crazy Citrus Cooler. In 2007, Crazy Citrus Cooler was discontinued. In 2011, a Chicago Ghostbusters group made a recipe that was said to taste exactly like the original.
Tags: The  Famous  Slimer  Ecto  Cooler    Commercial  1990s 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1416
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Bubble Tape  6 Feet of Bubble Gum Commercial 1991 It belongs here in the 90's section do to its Popularity in the 90's for Kids. Bubble Tape is a brand of bubble gum produced by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, introduced in the late 1980s[1][2]. It experienced its greatest popularity in the early 1990s due to its unique packaging and direct marketing to preteen children ("it's six feet of bubble gum for you, not them"—"them" referring to parents or just adults in general). Today, it is still a common find in most supermarkets, although advertising campaigns for it have subsided significantly. Bubble Tape comes in a small, round, plastic container similar in size to a hockey puck. This contains six feet (1.8 m) of gum wrapped in a spiral. The container functions much like a tape dispenser, although the top half can be removed.
Tags: Bubble  Tape    6  Feet  of  Bubble  Gum  Commercial  1991   
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1510
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Fruit By The Foot Commercial January 24 1991 Fruit by the Foot is a fruit snack made by Betty Crocker. Fruit by the Foot was introduced January 24, 1991 and is still in production. Fruit by the Foot is very similar to Fruit Roll-Ups (also a General Mills product), in its presentation of being rolled up within itself, but differs in taste, dimension and consumption methods. The similarity in name and concept is such that many people sometimes mistakenly refer to Fruit by the Foot as "Fruit Roll-Ups" and vice versa. The candy is 3 feet (0.91 m) long, and has a loop at the end. Fruit by the Foot is commonly known as Fruit Roll-Ups like its sister brand. Current marketing slogans include "3 Feet of Fun!" In the early 90s, Fruit by the Foot came with stickers that kids would frequently put on their lunch boxes to prove they had eaten Fruit by the Foot. The original Fruit by the Foot came with a long sticker which is no longer included. Since the 1990s, the paper backing has been printed with games, jokes, or trivia facts - though not all flavors have it, such as 'Rippin Berry Berry'.
Tags: Fruit  By  The  Foot  Commercial  January  24  1991 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 2477
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
George Foreman Regains Title at 45 George Foreman was an intimidating bruiser when he won the world heavyweight title by demolishing Joe Frazier in 1973. He surprisingly lost the crown to Muhammad Ali in Zaire in 1974. By 1977 Foreman was out of boxing and was making a living preaching in Texas. With funds getting a little low, Foreman made what many fans thought was a crazy comeback in 1987 at age 38. Much slower than he had been in his prime, Foreman could still hit with great power, though. Now a fan favorite because of his new likable persona, Foreman had a series of comeback wins. He lost a title try to Evander Holyfield in 1991 at age 42. Three years later he was given another shot against new champion Michael Moorer. Trailing badly on the scorecards entering the tenth round, the 45-year-old Foreman shocked the world with an historic knockout blow, as this clip shows. Listen to Jim Lampley's succinct call: "It happened! It happened!" Also listen to the excited, joyous cheering of the pro-Foreman crowd when Moorer hits the deck. It ranks as one of the magical moments in sports history.
Tags: boxing  George  Foreman  Michael  Moorer 
Added: 20th February 2013
Views: 1921
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Brien Taylor - Pitching Bust Brien Taylor was one of the most hyped amateur pitching prospects ever. Born in Beaufort, North Carolina, Taylor attended East Carteret High School. In his senior season, Taylor threw 88 innings, striking out 213 hitters while walking 28. His fastball often hit 98 and 99 mph. In 2006, agent Scott Boras claimed Taylor was the best high school pitcher he had ever seen. The New York Yankees selected Taylor with the first overall selection in the 1991 MLB draft and offered him $300,000 to sign a minor league contract, the typical amount given to the first overall draft choice at that time. However, Boras, acting as an advisor, told the Taylor family the previous year's top-rated high school pitcher, Todd Van Poppel, had gotten than $1.2 million to sign with the Oakland Athletics. Taylor held out for a three-year $1.2-million deal. He eventually signed for $1.55 million the day before he was to begin classes at a local junior college. The Yankees hoped Taylor would be the next Dwight Gooden and pitch in the majors at age 19. However Taylor needed to improve his pickoff move to first base, so he was assigned to the team's farm system. In 1992 Taylor was 6-8 for the Class A Fort Lauderdale Yankees, with a 2.57 earned run average and 187 strikeouts in 161 innings. The next year, as a 21-year-old with the Double-A Albany-Colonie Yankees, Taylor went 13-7 with a 3.48 ERA and had 150 strikeouts in 163 innings. Baseball America named him the game's best prospect and he was expected to pitch for the Triple-A Columbus Clippers of the International League in 1994 and start for the Yankees in 1995. On December 18, 1993 Taylor suffered a dislocated left shoulder and torn labrum while defending his brother in a fistfight. In the scuffle, Taylor fell on his pitching shoulder. Dr. Frank Jobe, a well-known orthopedic surgeon, called Taylor's injury one of the worst he'd seen. Taylor was never the same pitcher again. When he returned to baseball after surgery, his fastball was noticeably slower and he was unable to throw a curveball for a strike. Taylor spent the bulk of the remainder of his professional baseball career struggling at the Single-A level. Taylor bounced around different MLB farm teams until retiring in 2000. After baseball, Taylor moved to Raleigh and worked as a UPS package handler and later as a beer distributor. He fathered five daughters. By 2006, he was working as a bricklayer with his father. In January 2005, police charged Taylor with misdemeanor child abuse for allegedly leaving four of his children--none over 11--alone for more than eight hours. He didn't show up for his court date, and at one point there were four outstanding warrants for his arrest. According to financial records, he was earning $909 per month. In March 2012, Taylor was charged with cocaine trafficking after undercover narcotics agents purchased a large quantity of cocaine and crack cocaine from him over a period of several months. He was federally indicted on cocaine trafficking charges in June 2012. Taylor pled guilty in August 2012 and was sentenced to 38 months in prison, followed by three years' supervised release.
Tags: baseball  pitcher  Brien  Taylor 
Added: 4th March 2013
Views: 2423
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Kirby Puckett with David Letterman Kirby Puckett was one of the most popular and talented baseball players of his generation. He played 12 seasons with the Minnesota Twins from 1984 to 1995, leading them to World Series titles in both 1987 and 1991. In what would turn out to be Puckett's final MLB game, he was struck by a pitch by Dennis Martinez that broke his jaw on September 28, 1995. Puckett was hitting well during spring training of 1996, but woke up one morning unable to see out of his right eye. Suffering from glaucoma, Puckett was forced to retire. He became an executive with the Twins. This appearance on David Letterman's program took place in 1997. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. Puckett's final years were marred with accusations of violence, marital infidelity, sexual misconduct, spousal abuse, and other unseemly behavior that resulted in the Twins severing ties with him. Sports Illustrated ran an extremely unflattering cover story by Frank Deford on Puckett in a 2003 issue that chronicled his disturbing "secret life." Wrote Deford, "The media and the fans in Minnesota turned the Twins' Hall of Famer into a paragon of every virtue—-and that made his human flaws, when they came to light, all the more shocking." Puckett died of a cerebral hemorrhage eight days before his 46th birthday in 2006.
Tags: Kirby  Puckett  MLB  baseball  Minnesota  Twins  interview 
Added: 6th December 2013
Views: 946
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Al Sharpton Stabbed At Protest January 12, 1991: Rev. Jesse Jackson and others pray by bedside of Rev. Al Sharpton after he was stabbed during rally for Yusuf Hawkins in Bensonhurst New York. Police officers soon intervened and arrested the person who was later identified as Michael Riccardi who was later sentenced to 15 years for attempted murder.
Tags: Al  Sharpton  Stabbed  At  Rally  Reverend  Jesse  Jackson  Yusuf  Hawkins    Bensonhurst  New  York  race  Civil  Rights  leader  Michael  Riccardi  Janurary  12  1991 
Added: 12th January 2015
Views: 2984
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy

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