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Triangle Scarves and Bangle Bracelets As seen on the cover of a July 1963 Seventeen magazine, a summer sundress with a triangle scarf and a plastic bangle bracelet were de rigueur in the 1960s! Who didn't own dozens of those bracelets in every color of the rainbow?
Tags: sixties  fashions 
Added: 8th October 2010
Views: 651
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Barbara Billingsley of Leave it to Beaver fame dies CNN) -- Barbara Billingsley, who wore a classy pearl necklace and dispensed pearls of wisdom as America's quintessential mom on "Leave it to Beaver," has died at age 94, a family spokeswoman said Saturday. The actress passed away at 2 a.m. (5 a.m. ET) Saturday at her home in Santa Monica, California, after a long illness, spokeswoman Judy Twersky said. A private memorial is being planned. "America's favorite mother is now gone. I feel very fortunate to have been her 'son,' " actor Tony Dow, who played Wally Cleaver, said in a statement. "We were wonderful friends and I will miss her very much. My deepest sympathies to her sons, Glenn and Drew, and her entire family." Actor Jerry Mathers, who played Theodore "Beaver" Cleaver, spoke of Billingsley's talent during a 2000 appearance on CNN's "Larry King Live." "Barbara was always a true role model for me. She was a great actress," he said. "And in a lot of ways ... we kind of stifled her, because her true talent didn't really come out in 'Leave it Beaver.' She was like the straight man, but she has an awful lot of talent." The actress won a new legion of fans in a brief but memorable scene in the 1980 send-up movie "Airplane." "Oh, stewardess. I speak jive," Billingsley said in her role as a passenger attempting to comfort an ill man on the flight. From the moment its catchy theme song sounded in black-and-white TV sets of the 1950s, "Leave it to Beaver" enthralled Americans during a time of relative prosperity and world peace. Its characters represented middle-class white America. June Cleaver dutifully pecked her husband, Ward (played by the late Hugh Beaumont), when he came home to learn about the latest foibles -- nothing serious -- committed by Beaver and Wally. The parents would dispense moral advice to their sons. The boys' friends included Lumpy and the obsequious Eddie Haskell, who avoided trouble and often buttered up Ward and June. "That's a lovely dress you're wearing, Mrs. Cleaver," Eddie would typically say to Billingsley's character. Perhaps fittingly, "Leave it to Beaver" was canceled in 1963 on the eve of the JFK assassination, the Vietnam War and the tumult of the 1960s. Born December 22, 1915, in Los Angeles, Billingsley began her career as a model in New York City in 1936. She was under contract to MGM in 1945 before becoming a household name with the launch of "Leave it to Beaver" in 1957. Billingsley is survived by her two sons, Drew Billingsley of Granada Hills, California, and Glenn Billingsley of Phillips Ranch, California. Asked once to compare real-life families to TV families, Billingsley responded, "I just wish that we could have more families like those. Family is so important, and I just don't think we have enough people staying home with their babies and their children."
Tags: Leave  it  to  Beaver  Barbara  Billingsly 
Added: 16th October 2010
Views: 697
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Posted By: Carl1957
JFK - Ich Bin Ein Berliner On June 26, 1963, in the shadow of the Berlin Wall, John F. Kennedy delivered the most famous speech of his presidency. To show solidarity with the free citizens of West Berlin, JFK said the German phrase, 'Ich bin ein Berliner.' This sentence has three translations: 'I am a Berliner,' 'I am a citizen of Berlin,' or rather comically, 'I am a jelly doughnut.' An urban myth claims the Germans in the audience snickered at the comment because of the possible jelly doughnut translation. However, the truth is that most Germans were intelligent enough to realize which meaning was intended. An English equivalent would be if someone said, 'I am a New Yorker.' What would a reasonable person conclude? Does the speaker mean he is a resident of New York or a renowned magazine?
Tags: JFK  Berlin  speech  jelly  doughnut 
Added: 24th November 2010
Views: 710
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Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Champs Vs. College All-Stars 1934-1976 The Chicago Charities College All-Star Game was a preseason football tilt played annually (except 1974) from 1934 to 1976 between the National Football League champions and a team of star college seniors from the previous year. (There was one exception: The 1935 game involved the 1934 runner-up Chicago Bears instead of the champion New York Giants.) The game originally was a benefit for Chicago-area charities. Except for the 1943 and 1944 games which were held at Northwestern University, the game was always played at Soldier Field in Chicago. The first game, played before a crowd of 79,432 on August 31, 1934, was a scoreless tie between the all-stars and the Chicago Bears. The following year, a game that included future president Gerald Ford, the Bears won, 5-0. The first all-star win was in 1937 for a squad that featured Sammy Baugh. In the 1940s the games were competitive affairs that attracted large crowds to Soldier Field. But as the talent level of pro football improved, the all-stars had diminishing success. The last all-star win came in 1963, when a team coached by legendary quarterback Otto Graham beat the Green Bay Packers 20-17. By the 1970s, crowds for the event were dwindling. In addition, NFL coaches were reluctant to part with their new draftees (who would miss part of training camp) for a meaningless exhibition in which the players might be injured. A players' strike forced the cancellation of the 1974 game. The last game took place in a torrential downpour on July 23, 1976. Despite featuring stars such as Chuck Muncie, Mike Pruitt, Lee Roy Selmon and Jackie Slater, the collegians were hopelessly outclassed by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Pittsburgh was leading 24-0 late in the third quarter when play was suspended due to the awful weather conditions. The game was not restarted. Chicago Tribune Charities Inc., the sponsor of the game, elected not to bring it back for 1977. A program from the 1941 game is shown here. Overall, the NFL teams won 31 of the 42 games. The all-stars won nine. Two games ended in ties.
Tags: football  all-stars  NFL 
Added: 13th December 2010
Views: 17132
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Posted By: Lava1964
Loving Vs Virginia 1967 In June 1958, two residents of Virginia, Mildred Jeter, a black woman, and Richard Loving, a white man, were married in the District of Columbia. Shortly after their marriage, the Lovings returned to Virginia and established their marital abode in Caroline County. That October a grand jury issued an indictment charging the Lovings with violating Virginia's 1924 ban on interracial marriages. On January 6, 1959, the Lovings pleaded guilty to the charge and were sentenced to one year in jail; however, the trial judge suspended the sentence for a period of 25 years on the condition that the Lovings leave the state and not return to Virginia together for 25 years. He stated in an opinion that: 'Almighty God created the races white, black, yellow, malay and red, and he placed them on separate continents. And but for the interference with his arrangement there would be no cause for such marriages. The fact that he separated the races shows that he did not intend for the races to mix.' After their convictions, the Lovings took up residence in the District of Columbia. On November 6, 1963, they filed a motion in the state trial court to vacate the judgment and set aside the sentence on the ground that the statutes which they had violated were repugnant to the Fourteenth Amendment. No decison was rendered for four years. Finally, in 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled (in a 9-0 verdict) that race could not be used as grounds to deny marriage. At the time, 17 U.S. states had laws on the books prohibiting interracial marriages. Richard Loving was killed in a car crash in 1975. Mildred Loving died in 2008.
Tags: civil  law  interracial  marriage 
Added: 17th December 2010
Views: 591
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chrysler Turbine The fourth-generation Chrysler turbine engine ran at up to 44,500 revolutions per minute, according to the owner's manual,[1] and could use diesel fuel, unleaded gasoline, kerosene, JP-4 jet fuel, and even vegetable oil. The engine would run on virtually anything and the President of Mexico tested this theory by running one of the first cars—successfully—on tequila. Air/fuel adjustments were required to switch from one to another, and the only evidence of what fuel was being used was the odor of the exhaust.
Tags: Chrysler  Turbine  1963  turbo  engine  jet  engine 
Added: 1st January 2011
Views: 1636
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Posted By: Old Fart
Zsa Zsa Gabor in a Studebaker Commercial Tags: Zsa  Zsa  Gabor  in  a  Studebaker  Commercial  Lark  1963 
Added: 9th January 2011
Views: 1258
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Posted By: pfc
Then and Now-Partridge Family Tracy Suzanne Crough,born March 6, 1963 was the youngest daughter on the Partridge Family who played the tambourine. During a Reunion Show with NBC she March 2010 she said she is currently a manager at Office Max.
Tags: Then  and  Now-Partridge  Family  Tracy  Suzanne  Crough 
Added: 9th February 2011
Views: 1805
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Posted By: Cliffy
Billy Gilbert Actor Billy Gilbert was a versatile performer, but he is best remembered for comedic roles. He was discovered by Stan Laurel and recommended to Hal Roach. Roach put him to work in Laurel & Hardy and Our Gang shorts, usually as an excitable, short-tempered character. (Gilbert played the exasperated home owner in the 1932 Academy Award-winning classic L&H featurette The Music Box.) Gilbert later worked alongside Charlie Chaplin in The Great Dictator, spoofing Hermann Goring with his role of 'Herring.' Gilbert became famous for his comical sneezes, so much so that he provided the voice of Sneezy in Walt Disney's 1937 animated classic Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Poor health forced Gilbert's retirement from acting in 1963. Nevertheless he was a popular figure at L&H fan club meetings until his death at age 77 in 1971. Although Gilbert was happily married for 34 years, his family life was touched by tragedy: His 13-year-old son committed suicide after his grandmother chastised him for letting a pet parrot escape from its cage.
Tags: Billy  Gilbert  comic  actor 
Added: 21st February 2011
Views: 605
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Posted By: Lava1964
Look Magazine Look was a hugely popular general-interest magazine that focused more on photography than articles. Published in Des Moines, Iowa, it began in February 1937 and was intended to be a monthly periodical. Within weeks, more than a million copies were bought of each issue, and it became a bi-weekly. By 1948 it sold 2.9 million copies per issue. Circulation reached 3.7 million in 1954, and peaked at 7.75 million in 1969. Its advertising revenue peaked in 1966 at $80 million. Of the leading general-interest, large-format magazines, Look had a circulation second only to Life and ahead of The Saturday Evening Post, which closed in 1969, and Collier's, which folded in 1956. Look was published under various company names: Look, Inc. (1937–45), Cowles Magazines (1946–65), and Cowles Communications, Inc. (1965–71). Its New York editorial offices were located in the architecturally distinctive 488 Madison Avenue, dubbed the Look Building, now on the National Register of Historic Places. Beginning in 1963, Norman Rockwell, after closing his career with the Saturday Evening Post, began making illustrations for Look. Look ceased publication with its issue of October 19, 1971, the victim of a $5 million loss in revenues in 1970 (with television cutting deeply into its advertising revenues), a slack economy and rising postal rates. Circulation was still at 6.5 million when it closed.
Tags: Look  magazine  photography 
Added: 9th April 2011
Views: 557
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Posted By: Lava1964

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