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1960 Airline Ticket There was no such thing as "ticketless" flights in 1960. You bought an airline ticket that was often filled out by hand--and you were in trouble if you lost it! The one shown here is good for a one-way flight from Chicago to Los Angeles on American Airlines.
Tags: airline  ticket  1960  paper 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 819
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Eye Lashes By Twiggy Tags: Eye  Lashes  By  Twiggy  Yardley  fashion  model  60's  1960's  skinny 
Added: 16th December 2015
Views: 457
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Posted By: Cathy
Jack Wood- Born To Wander Yes, from that Bacardi commercial.
Tags: Jack  Wood-  Born  To  Wander  Bacardi  commercial  60's  1960s  rock  and  roll  rockabilly 
Added: 30th December 2015
Views: 373
Rating:
Posted By: Music Maiden
Vanishing TV Character - Chris Carmichael After I Love Lucy and the Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour ended in 1960, Lucille Ball took a two-year hiatus from television before returning in The Lucy Show in October 1962. This sitcom--loosely based on the book Life Without George--had Ball playing Lucy Carmichael, the widowed mother of two children who shared a large home in fictitious Danville, NY with divorced friend Vivan Bagley (Vivian Vance). Bagley had a young son as well, named Sherman. Lucy's late husband had left her a significant trust fund on which to live. However, her banker kept tight control of the estate. Lucy's attractive teenage daughter, Chris, was played by Candy Moore. (Moore's first noteworthy TV appearance came in a 1961 episode of Leave It To Beaver where she played Margie Manners, the pretty daughter of the Cleavers' occasional housekeeper. The plot had Wally smitten with her.) The first Lucy Show episode focused on Lucy badly coping with Chris going on a date with a boy who owns a car. Despite living in the same home as Lucy, Chris appeared in just 39 of the 84 episodes in the sitcom's first three seasons. Nevertheless, Moore was often featured in teen magazines. The Lucy Show was an enormous hit, finishing fourth in the year-end Nielsen ratings in its first season. After the first two seasons, however, Vivian Vance tired of commuting from her home on the east coast to California to do the show. When it became apparent that Vance was going to quit the show after the third season, the entire premise of the sitcom changed. Beginning in the fourth season, Lucy relocated to southern California--along with her banker, Theodore J. Mooney (Gale Gordon)--which defies probability. The trust fund was no longer mentioned and Lucy became a secretary at Mr. Mooney's new bank. It was explained that Vivian had re-married and remained in Danville while Chris had gone off to college. Chris was never seen or mentioned again. (Lucy's son, Jerry, remained a regular in Season #4 but was written out of the show before Season #5. The plot had Jerry enrolling in military school.) It was later revealed that CBS wanted to retain Candy Moore on the revised show because of her popularity with young viewers, but Lucy was adamantly opposed. In fact, Lucy threatened to retire over the issue. Moore appeared in nine episodes of the Donna Reed Show and then acted only sporadically thereafter. She did have a small role in Raging Bull in 1980, but Moore's last acting credit came in 1981. According to various sources, Moore, who turned 70 in 2017, is or was an English teacher at a dramatic school in Los Angeles.
Tags: Candy  Moore  Chris  Carmichael  Lucy  Show 
Added: 7th January 2018
Views: 274
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Second Hundred Years - Sitcom Flop The 1960s were famous for producing far-fetched sitcoms. Here is another that aired briefly on ABC: The Second Hundred Years. Starring Monte Markham and Arthur O'Connell, its crazy plot had O'Connell playing Edwin Carpenter, a man whose gold-prospecting father (Luke) was swept by an avalanche into an Alaskan glacier in 1900. Another avalanche 67 years later conveniently exposed Luke's frozen carcass. Miraculously he was revived--without having aged in the intervening years! Thus Luke now physically resembled his 33-year-old grandson, Ken. (Luke and Ken were played by the same actor, of course, Monte Markham.) Furthermore, for national security reasons, the general public was not allowed to know about this remarkable incident. The show's plots frequently focused on Ken and Luke being able to take the other's place in social situations, and in the culture shock Luke experienced in suddenly going from 1900 to 1967. (In one episode Luke saw a go-go dancer in a cage, thought she was being held against her will, and "rescued" her.) The Second Hundred Years premiered on September 3, 1967 to fairly strong ratings, but it was universally panned by TV critics. Within a very short time it dropped into the bottom 25 network shows and was cancelled after 26 episodes. Here is a promotional clip that aired on ABC just before its premier.
Tags: Monte  Markham  The  Second  Hundred  Years  sitcom  Arthur  O 
Added: 5th April 2018
Views: 76
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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