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Our Gang - Pay As You Exit Here's the full 1936 Our Gang short comedy titled Pay As You Exit. The gang puts on something akin to Romeo and Juliet--with a strongman act by Spanky in between! Look for former gang member, the slimmed-down Joe Cobb, as the audience member who doesn't want to pay his one-cent admission price.
Tags: Our  Gang  Pay  As  You  Exit 
Added: 17th May 2013
Views: 958
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Luz Long Helps Jesse Owens At the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Jesse Owens won four gold medals. His toughest struggle was in the long jump. Owens was the overwhelming favorite to win the event, but he fouled on his first two attempts. A third foul would eliminate him. Germany's Luz Long, the European long jump champion, went out of his way to assist the discouraged Owens. Long (who had set a new Olympic record with one of his qualifying jumps) informed Owens that he could easily qualify for the finals by leaping several inches behind the foul line. Owens followed Long's advice--leaping with at least four inches to spare--and qualified for the long jump finals. In the finals, the Olympic record was broken five times. Owens had the longest leap and won the gold medal. Long was the first to congratulate him. Owens and Long became friends. Long was killed serving with the German army in Sicily in 1943. Long was posthumously awarded the Coubertin Medal for Sportsmanship by the IOC. After the war, Long's widow and son continued to regularly correspond with Owens until his death in 1973.
Tags: 1936  Olympics  Luz  Long  Jesse  Owens  long  jump 
Added: 12th July 2013
Views: 845
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lou Gehrig Beer and Cigarette Photo This 1936 photo from Life Magazine's archives shows New York Yankee great Lou Gehrig enjoying a beer and a cigarette in the clubhouse following a game.
Tags: Lou  Gehrig  baseball  beer  cigarette 
Added: 16th September 2013
Views: 808
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 1418
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
MLB Player Johnny Dickshot One of the more curious names in MLB history belongs to Johnny Dickshot, a journeyman outfielder who played six seasons in the big leagues between 1936 and 1945. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, New York Giants and Chicago White Sox. Dickshot's nickname was 'Ugly.' Dickshot was not even his surname at birth: It was Dicksus.
Tags: MLB  Johnny  Dickshot 
Added: 16th August 2014
Views: 1190
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Polo at the Olympics Polo was contested at five Summer Olympics: 1900, 1908, 1920, 1924 and 1936. Over the years only nine different countries participated. That's not to say the tournaments were necessarily small: At the 1900 Olympics in Paris there were 13 teams--but six of them were French and the other seven were British! At the 1908 London Olympics the entire field of 12 teams were comprised of British squads. At the final Olympic tournament in Berlin in 1936, the Argentinian team (show in the photo) was easily the class of the five-team field. In their only two matches they outscored Mexico and Great Britain by a combined score of 26-5. The IOC invited India and the Unites States to enter teams, but neither country showed any desire to send a polo squad to Berlin. Why was polo discontinued at the Olympics? The expense of transporting horses overseas combined with a general lack of interest doomed polo to extinction from the Olympic program.
Tags: polo  Olympics 
Added: 5th March 2015
Views: 460
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Posted By: Lava1964
Future King Plays Wimbledon Doubles - 1926 In 1926, Sir Louis Greig won the Royal Air Force's tennis championship. In those days of strict amateurism at the top levels of tennis, Greig's victory earned him the right to play in the gentlemen's singles at Wimbledon. He also opted to enter the gentlemen's doubles tournament. Greig chose as his partner a noteworthy someone whom he had mentored and often advised--the Duke of York, the man who would ascend to the British throne in December 1936. Greig and his royal partner faced two other Brits, Arthur Gore and Herbert Roper Barrett, in the first round. Gore and Barrett had little trouble dispatching the future King George VI and Greig 6-1, 6-2, 6-2. Apparently the Duke of York was quite a good sport about being thrashed so handily. Greig fared far better in the gentlemen's singles, advancing to the fourth round. Although there is a frequent royal presence at Wimbledon, the Duke of York remains the only royal to actually have competed at the world's most prestigious tennis tournament.
Tags: tennis  Wimbledon  Duke  of  York  royalty  doubles 
Added: 10th July 2015
Views: 590
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Posted By: Lava1964
Darla Hood on Jack Benny Program On October 30, 1962 the Jack Benny Program featured 31-year-old Darla Hood, who had been the prominent female character in the Our Gang comedy shorts from 1936 through 1943. When this show aired, Hood had a few minor hit records to her credit, was a nightclub singer, and was a mother of three. She performed one of her songs in the first half of the show--but this second half featured a wonderful parody of Our Gang titled 'My Gang' in which Jack played Alfalfa. Of course Darla Hood played...Darla Hood! Enjoy the fun!
Tags: Jack  Benny  Show  Darla  Hood  Our  Gang  parody 
Added: 7th September 2015
Views: 1068
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Posted By: Lava1964
Iconic Depression-Era Photo Thirty-two-year-old Florence Owens Thomson became the face of the Great Depression after she was photographed by Dorothea Lange in 1936. Lange, a photographer of some repute, had been hired by the federal government to capture images of how the hard times of the 1930 were affecting Americans. The photo--which Lange titled "Migrant Mother"--did not identify Thompson by name, only that she was a 32-year-old widowed mother of seven children who was among at least 2,500 transient and destitute people seeking menial work as a pea picker in a California camp. The compelling photo was widely reproduced in newspapers across the continent and Thompson was subsequently identified. She died in 1983 at age 80.
Tags: Depression  photo  Florence  Owens  Thompson  Dorothea  Lange 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 400
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rarest Canadian Coin - 1936 Dot Cent The rarest and most desirable coin in Canadian history is the "1936 dot" one-cent coin. Only three are known to exist. Why were they struck? On January 20, 1936, King George V died shortly after his 71st birthday. As is customary with Canadian coinage, if a monarch dies anytime during a year, his/her portrait remains on all the coins minted in that year. George V was succeeded on the throne by his eldest son, Edward VIII. Anyone with even passing knowledge of the history of the British royal family ought to know that Edward VIII abdicated late in 1936 in order to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. He was succeeded by his younger brother, who became George VI. This presented a problem for the Royal Canadian Mint. It had already prepared dies for its 1937 coins with the likeness of Edward VIII, which were now outdated and useless. It was feared that the new dies with George VI's head would not be ready for striking in 1937. The mint conceived a backup plan: They would reissue the 1936 coins bearing George V's likeness, but place a dot below the 1936 date to indicate they were made during the 1937 mintage year. Only three samples of the one-cent coin bearing the distinctive dot were struck--and all three were kept by the director of the mint. As it turned out, the dies for 1937 with George VI's head were ready in time for 1937 strikes, so the 1936 dot coins were not needed. One of the three rare coins sold at auction in 2013 for about $250,000 U.S.
Tags: 1936  dot  Canadian  cent  rare  numismatics 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 19
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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