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Lindbergh Kidnapping Case 1932 One of the most famous criminal cases in American history was the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh, Jr., son of the famous aviator. On March 1, 1932, sometime between 8 and 10 p.m., the toddler was snatched from his upstairs nursery at the Lindberghs' still-under-construction retreat home near Hopewell, New Jersey. A note in badly written English was found on the window sill. It demanded $50,000 in ransom for the safe return of the child. A crude homemade ladder was also found leaning against the house. There were few other clues. The case took an odd turn when a 72-year-old good samaritan named John F. Condon took out a newspaper ad volunteering to act as an intermediary to negotiate with the kidnappers. His offer was accepted but neither Lindbergh nor Condon immediately informed the police for fear of putting the child's life in danger. Eventually the money--much of it in rare gold certificates--was paid to a man in a cemetery but the child was not returned. Shortly afterward a child's body was found in a wooded area not far from the Lindbergh home. It was badly decomposed and was identified as the Lindbergh child based on a slight deformity on its right foot. The child had died from a severe skull fracture. Eventually Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German immigrant with a criminal record in his homeland, was tracked down for spending one of the gold certificates at a gas station. About $15,000 in ransom money was found in his house. Planks from his garage matched the wood used to make the crude ladder. Hauptmann proclaimed his innocence, claiming he was only holding the money for a man named Isador Fisch who had returned to Germany and died there. Hauptmann said he only began spending the money after learning of Fisch's death. Hauptmann was tried, found guilty, and executed in 1936. There is little doubt that Hauptmann was somehow connected with the kidnapping, but there are lingering suspicions that he was assisted by someone who knew the routine and the goings-on at the Lindbergh household. The Lindberghs were not even supposed to be at their Hopewell home on the night of the kidnapping. The kidnapper(s) also had to know precisely when and where the boy would be left unattended.
Tags: Lindbergh  kidnapping 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1440
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ambrose Small Case 1919 One of the most intriguing missing persons cases is that of Toronto theatre magnate Ambrose J. Small. Small was last seen alive on December 2, 1919 after selling his theatre chain for $1 million--a fantastic sum in those days. He lunched with his wife Theresa at the King Edward Hotel, gave her the check to deposit in their bank account, bought some newspapers from a young street vendor--and vanished forever. Small's disappearance was not reported to the police by his wife for nearly two weeks, leading to speculation that she was involved. Theresa was well known in Toronto for her charitable deeds and was used to Ambrose vanishing without warning for extended periods while away on gambling binges. To spare Theresa embarrassment, the Toronto Police did not formally announce Small was missing until his disappearance was reported in the Toronto Star in January 1920. Small had made his fortune in the theatre business staging low-brow plays often with risque themes. After his disappearance it was discovered that Small had a secret 'love nest' above his Grand Opera House in Toronto where he often 'entertained' chorus girls. Not long after Small vanished, his bookkeeper John Doughty vanished too with $105,000 in bonds taken from Small's safe deposit box. Doughty was later found in Oregon and arrested for theft. He was given a five-year prison sentence. Despite international headlines and a $50,000 reward, no trace of Small was ever found. An elderly Grand Opera House employee claimed to have overheard a violent argument between Small and Doughty on the afternoon Small vanished. The case was officially closed by Toronto police in 1960. Modern investigators recently found a memo written by an investigating officer in 1936, a year after Theresa died. The memo stated there was ample evidence that Ambrose Small had been murdered and that both Theresa Small and John Doughty were guilty of the crime--indicating that the Toronto Police were somehow involved in a major cover-up. The ghost of Ambrose Small is said to haunt one of his old theatres in London, Ontario.
Tags: Ambrose  Small  disappearance 
Added: 15th December 2007
Views: 2034
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Posted By: Lava1964
Modern Times Final Scene Charlie Chaplin's last film in which he played his famous tramp character was Modern Times (1936). Many of his films ended with Chaplin walking or running down a highway. This is the only time he has a companion.
Tags: Modern  Times  Charlie  Chaplin 
Added: 27th December 2007
Views: 1469
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mickey Rooneys Silent Film Days Mickey Rooney, whose real name was Joseph Yule, began performing at the age of fifteen months as part of his parents' vaudeville routine, wearing a specially tailored tuxedo. His parents separated in 1924. A year later, Mrs Yule moved with Joseph to Hollywood, where she managed a tourist home. Fontaine Fox had placed a newspaper ad for a dark haired child to play the role of "Mickey McGuire" in a series of short silent films, and, lacking the money to have her son's hair dyed, she took him to the audition after applying burnt cork to his scalp. Joseph got the role and became "Mickey" for 78 of the comedies, running from 1927 to 1936, starting with Mickey's Circus, released September 4, 1927. During an interruption in the series in 1932, Mrs. Yule made plans to take her son on a ten week vaudeville tour as "Mickey McGuire", but Fox sued successfully to stop him from using the name. Mrs. Yule suggested the stage name of "Mickey Looney" for her comedian son, which he altered slightly to a less frivolous version. Rooney did other films, including a few more of the McGuire films in his adolescence, and signed with MGM in 1934, where they cast him as the teenage son of a judge in 1937's "A Family Affair", setting Rooney on the way to another successful film series, and the rest is show business history.
Tags: joseph  yule  mickey  rooney  mcquire  silent  films 
Added: 28th December 2007
Views: 1667
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Posted By: Guido
Thurston The Great 1915 the spirits do come back, if you stay for the second show. 1915 poster advertising an appearance by the magician Howard Thurston (1869-1936), the "King of Cards" . . .
Tags: vintage      poster      Thurston  The  Great      Howard  Thurston 
Added: 9th May 2008
Views: 907
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Posted By: Teresa
Rangers-Canadiens NHL Game 1936 Great vintage sports footage! British Pathe newsreels tended to go far afield to bring viewers interesting activities from around the world. They were present at Madison Square Garden on January 28, 1936 to film an NHL game between the Montreal Canadiens (not Canadians!) versus the New York Rangers. A few things to notice; the absence of the center red line; the players standing sideways to one another on faceoffs; and the way goalies used to hold their sticks before they wore trappers on their catching hands.
Tags: hockey  NHL  New  York  Rangers  Montreal  Canadiens 
Added: 26th February 2016
Views: 774
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Posted By: Lava1964
Modern Times Charlie Chaplin 1936 P.G.
Tags: charlie  chaplin  modern  times 
Added: 11th February 2008
Views: 868
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Posted By: tommy7
Shirley Temple Early Bird Shirley Temple sings 'Early Bird' in the film Captain January (1936).
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Early  Bird 
Added: 3rd March 2008
Views: 1170
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Posted By: Lava1964
Paris Cafe 1936 Café-goers enjoy a pleasant afternoon in Montparnasse—Left Bank center of bohemian life in Paris . .
Tags: vintage      photo      Paris 
Added: 5th May 2008
Views: 858
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Posted By: Teresa
Final Issue  of Life Magazine 1972 Life, the magazine that turned photo-journalism into an artform, ceased publication in 1972. It had been a weekly 'general audience' magazine since 1936. A staple at newsstands, at one point it sold more than 13 million copies per week. By 1969, with general-interest magazines losing popularity, Life was no longer profitable. The December 29, 1972 year-in-review issue marked the end of Life. The word 'goodbye' appeared on the back cover.
Tags: Life  Magazine  last  issue 
Added: 11th June 2008
Views: 6684
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Posted By: Lava1964

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