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1924 Olympic Rugby Final You may have to watch this clip through the appropriate link. Nevertheless, here are a few minutes of the gold-medal rugby match from the 1924 Paris Olympics. It was the fourth time rugby had been part of the Summer Olympics. In 1924 only three countries entered teams: the United States, Romania, and France. In the round-robin event, France crushed Romania 61-3. The Americans blasted the Romanians 37-0 to set up a championship encounter against the French. The host French showed great animosity against the American team (that was mostly made up of students from Stanford University). The French refused to allow the Americans to have anything resembling a practice field, so they ended up working out in a local park. The Americans were kicked out of their hotel and also lost about $4,000 in valuables when their supposedly secure locker room was broken into by thieves. Undeterred, the Americans, despite being 5:1 underdogs in wagering, thumped the French 17-3 to take the gold medals. They needed a police escort to leave the stadium safely. One American substitute was knocked cold when he was struck over the head with a spectator's walking stick! Rugby has not been in any Olympics since that time, but it will return to the Games in 2016.
Tags: Olympics  rugby  1924  Paris  USA  France 
Added: 17th March 2013
Views: 1047
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Posted By: Lava1964
1924 Olympics - Team Gymnastics How times have changed! Check out how men's team gymnastics were presented at the 1924 Paris Olympics. That's the Danish team in action.
Tags: 1924  Olympics  Paris  gymnastics 
Added: 5th July 2013
Views: 794
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Posted By: Lava1964
Remains of George Mallory Found - 1999 Seventy-Five years after British mountaineer George Mallory vanished in June 1924 in his attempt to be the first man to scale Mount Everest, an expedition from National Geographic was organized to try to find his remains--along with those of his climbing colleague Andrew Irvine. The two were last seen alive about 800 meters from the summit. In 1979 a Chinese mountaineer reported to a Japanese climber that he had come across the remains of "an Englishman" during an ascent in 1975. The Chinese climber was killed in an avalanche the following day before he could give precise directions to the corpse. Going on the general location the Chinese climber had provided, the 1999 expedition covered a search area about the size of a dozen football fields. Sure enough, on May 1, 1999, Mallory's mummified corpse, sun bleached to an alabaster white, was discovered face down and fused to the mountain scree by American searcher Conrad Anker. ID tags on the clothing quickly confirmed the body was indeed Mallory's. Found in Mallory's possession was a letter from his brother and an unpaid bill Mallory owed to a London clothing shop. Mallory had several broken bones and a punctured skull, leading to speculation that he had severely injured himself in a sudden, violent fall and likely froze to death in a helpless state in a matter of minutes. Whether Mallory made it to Everest's summit or not is a matter of heated debate. Irvine's body has yet to be found. Warning: The clip is a little bit gruesome.
Tags: mountaineering  George  Mallory  corpse  discovery 
Added: 26th October 2014
Views: 1044
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Posted By: Lava1964
Polo at the Olympics Polo was contested at five Summer Olympics: 1900, 1908, 1920, 1924 and 1936. Over the years only nine different countries participated. That's not to say the tournaments were necessarily small: At the 1900 Olympics in Paris there were 13 teams--but six of them were French and the other seven were British! At the 1908 London Olympics the entire field of 12 teams were comprised of British squads. At the final Olympic tournament in Berlin in 1936, the Argentinian team (show in the photo) was easily the class of the five-team field. In their only two matches they outscored Mexico and Great Britain by a combined score of 26-5. The IOC invited India and the Unites States to enter teams, but neither country showed any desire to send a polo squad to Berlin. Why was polo discontinued at the Olympics? The expense of transporting horses overseas combined with a general lack of interest doomed polo to extinction from the Olympic program.
Tags: polo  Olympics 
Added: 5th March 2015
Views: 524
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Posted By: Lava1964
President Truman Threatens Music Critic President Harry S. Truman had one child--daughter Margaret--who was born in 1924. She began singing locally in choirs in Missouri as a youth. By the late 1940s, when her father was president, she got more noteworthy singing gigs on the radio and in occasional concerts. On December 5, 1950 Margaret performed a program of Schumann, Schubert and Mozart pieces at Constitution Hall in Washington. The Washington Post's music critic, Paul Hume, wrote, "Miss Truman is a unique American phenomenon with a pleasant voice of little size and fair quality. She is extremely attractive on stage. Yet Miss Truman cannot sing very well. She is flat a good deal of the time--more so last night than at any time we have heard her in past years." Upon reading Hume's review, father Harry's paternal instincts kicked in and he went berserk. The president quickly penned a blistering missive to Hume that called him a "frustrated old man who wishes he could have been successful." It concluded with the president bluntly stating, "Some day I hope to meet you. When that happens you'll need a new nose, a lot of beefsteak for black eyes, and perhaps a supporter below." Hume was astonished by the letter and showed it to his editor who planned to print it in the next issue of the Post. However, the paper's publisher nixed the idea. Nevertheless, Hume told Milton Berliner, the music critic of the Washington News, about HST's threatening letter. The story ran in the rival newspaper and was later widely circulated well beyond the District of Columbia via the wire services.
Tags: Harry  Margaret  Truman  singer  criticism  threat 
Added: 5th July 2015
Views: 1242
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Posted By: Lava1964
Montreal Maroons 1924-1938 For 14 seasons from 1924-25 through 1937-38 there were two National Hockey League teams located in Montreal. Clad in the color for which they were named, the Montreal Maroons were created, supposedly, as the city's anglophone team while the older, established Canadiens represented Montreal's French-speaking populace. The famous Montreal Forum was actually built as the Maroons' home arena--not the Canadiens'. The Maroons lost their first game 2-1 to another expansion team, the Boston Bruins, on December 1, 1924, The very next season, however, the Maroons won the Stanley Cup, defeating the Victoria Cougars three games to one in a best-of-five final. (That was the last year in which non-NHL team were permitted to compete for pro hockey's holy grail.) Despite usually being a competitive team for most of their short existence--they also won the Stanley Cup in 1934-35--the Maroons clearly were the city's second choice in popularity. The Great Depression also hurt the team at the gate. The Maroons finished dead last in NHL attendance three years in a row during the 1930s. After an uncharacteristic last-place finish in 1937-38, the Montreal Maroons ceased operations. Their final game, fittingly, was a 6-3 loss to their intra-city rivals the Montreal Canadiens on March 17, 1938. Eleven Maroon players are enshrined in the Hockey Hall of fame as well as five Maroon coaches. Overall, the Maroons finished with an all-time regular-season record of 271 wins, 260 losses and 91 ties. The team's all-time leading scorer, Nels Stewart, held the NHL record for career goals (324) until 1952. He scored 185 of them as a member of the Maroons.
Tags: Montreal  Maroons  defunct  NHL  team 
Added: 21st January 2016
Views: 591
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Posted By: Lava1964
Scofflaw - Prize-Winning Prohibition Word During America's Prohibition years, violations of the Volstead Act (which outlawed the sale, transportation, and manufacture of alcoholic beverages) were widespread. In 1924, an ardent Massachusetts prohibitionist named Delcevare King offered a $200 prize to anyone who could create a new word that would heap shame the lawless drinkers and those who enabled them. Two entrants--both from Massachusetts--named Henry Dale and Kate Butler each came up with the same winning word: scofflaw. It was clever a combination of the verb scoff (meaning to mock, deride or ridicule) and, of course, law. Dale and Butler split the $200 prize. The word did catch on and, over the years, scofflaw has expanded its meaning to encompass those who willfully break any law--not just liquor statutes.
Tags: Prohibition  scofflaw  contest  lexicography 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 270
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Posted By: Lava1964

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