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Death of Calvin Coolidge Jr This photo of president Calvin Coolidge's family was taken on June 30, 1924. Sixteen-year-old Calvin Junior is on the left. That same day young Calvin developed a blister on his foot while playing tennis with older brother John on the White House tennis court. The blister became infected, resulting in blood poisoning. There were no antibiotics in 1924. He died a week later on July 7. I often use this story as an example of the 'good old days' not being so good if one became ill.
Tags: Calvin  Coolidge  junior  death 
Added: 11th July 2009
Views: 7427
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Posted By: Lava1964
Last Canadian WWI Soldier Turns 109 John Babcock, believed to be Canada's last surviving First World War veteran, turned 109 years old today. Since 1924 he has been living in Spokane, WA. Because there were no dual citizenship laws at the time, when Babcock obtained American citizenship, he had to forfeit his Canadian citizenship. After Canada's prime minister Stephen Harper learned about this, Mr. Babcock had his Canadian citizenship restored in a special ceremony in 2008. Babcock is pictured here with his 80-year-old wife. (Cradle robber!)
Tags: First  World  War  veteran  Canada  John  Babcock 
Added: 23rd July 2009
Views: 962
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Posted By: Lava1964
Charley Chase - Forgotten Comedian One of the overlooked comedy greats from the silent-screen era was Charley Chase. Chase began working in films at age 19 in 1912 and was still amusing audiences well into the sound era. Chase performed in comedies under Mack Sennett at Keystone but he is more famous for his long association with Hal Roach Studios. Chase often played a luckless character who was frequently the victim of unfortunate circumstances. Wrote one film historian, "Charley Chase was always innocent--but he got caught anyway." Often the setup to Chase's film gags was long and complex. Consider this clip from the 1924 film Accidental Accidents. Sadly, Chase died of a heart attack in 1940 at the age of 46.
Tags: Charley  Chase  silen  film  comedian 
Added: 7th March 2014
Views: 1037
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Posted By: Lava1964
First Female President - Edith Wilson There hasn't been a female president of the United States, you say? Technically that's correct. However, many historians consider the second Mrs. Woodrow Wilson to have been a de facto president. Woodrow Wilson was first elected president in 1912. His wife Ellen died of Bright's Disease in 1914. In March 1915, Wilson met a widow 15 years his junior, Edith Bolling Galt. A whirlwind romance occurred. The two were married in December 1915. In August 1919, while on a cross-country tour to garner support for his proposed League of Nations, president Wilson suffered a stroke. The seriousness of the president's affliction was not widely known. Throughout the remaining 19 months of Wilson's presidency, Edith greatly assisted her husband. According to her memoirs, she made numerous decisions regarding which tasks and paperwork would and would not occupy the president's time. Some historians claim she went beyond her wifely duties and actually made presidential decisions on her husband's behalf. Wilson died in 1924. After Edith's death in 1961, the stories of her excessive influence on the ailing president helped spur the passage of the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which, under special circumstances, gives presidential powers to the vice-president when a president is alive but greatly incapacitated.
Tags: Edith  Bolling  Galt  Wilson  first  lady 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 1465
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Posted By: Lava1964
Our Gang - Mary Kornman Pretty Mary Kornman was the first notable female star of the Our Gang comedies. When Hal Roach announced in 1922 his intention to produce a series of films starring ordinary kids, six-year-old Mary was suggested by her parents. (Mary's father was one of Roach's photographers.) The cute blonde replaced Peggy Cartwright as the most noteworthy female cast member. She appeared in more than 40 Our Gang shorts in the silent era, often as the heartthrob for smitten boys. This photo was taken in 1924 when Mary was nine. She was dropped from the troupe before her eleventh birthday in 1926 when she was judged to be too old--and was replaced as the lead female by Jean Darling. Mary's younger sister, Mildred, had several non-speaking roles in Our Gang movies from 1926 through 1935. Mary kept acting until 1940. One role had Mary playing the female lead opposite John Wayne in one of his early low-budget westerns. She returned to do two Our Gang shorts in the sound era. Mary appeared as herself, along with a few other Our Gang 'old-timers,' in Reunion in Rhythm (1937). She also played the role of the school teacher in 'Fish Hooky' (1933), which is considered one of the best Our Gang films. Mary died of cancer in 1973 at the age of 57.
Tags: Mary  Kornman  Our  Gang  cast 
Added: 27th November 2009
Views: 2556
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Posted By: Lava1964
1924 Canadian Olympic Hockey Team This is a photo of Canada's first Olympic hockey team. At the inaugural Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France in 1924, Canada sent a local amateur team (the Toronto Granites) to compete against the world's best. The results were horribly lopsided, to say the least: Playing three games in three days, Canada overwhelmed their Pool 'A' opponents. The Canadians thumped Czechoslovakia 30-0, Sweden 22-0, and Switzerland 33-0. In the medal round, Canada beat Great Britain 19-2 and the United States 6-1 to capture the gold medals. (Entering that final game, the Americans had outscored Belgium, France, Great Britain and Sweden by an aggregate score of 72-0.) Overall, Canada outscored its five opponents 110-3. Harry Watson scored 37 of Canada's goals. The Canadians' victory was so decisive that Canada was awarded an automatic bye into the final round at the next Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland in 1928. None of the Canadians ever played pro hockey.
Tags: hockey  Olympics  Canada 
Added: 4th March 2010
Views: 1095
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Posted By: Lava1964
Troubled Actress Gail Russell Gail Russell was a dark-eyed beauty who starred with some of the most popular leading men in Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s, including John Wayne, Joel McCrae and Alan Ladd. Born in Chicago on September 21, 1924, Russell was a shy child and often hid beneath her parents' piano when they entertained. The family moved to Los Angeles when she was 14. Even though art was Russell’s passion, her mother convinced her to audition at Paramount Studios. Gail was offered a standard seven-year contract at $50 a week. Upon graduating from high school, she signed with Paramount. Russell suffered terribly from stage fright. She made her first film appearance at 19 in Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour. The following year she appeared in Lady in the Dark. Although Russell’s role was minor, the film was nominated for three Oscars, which boosted her career. Russell's raven hair and enigmatic beauty was particularly suited to the ghost story plot of The Uninvited, her second film of 1944. During filming, Russell’s stage fright was so great that one of her co-stars suggested alcohol as a means to calm her nerves. Russell completed the film, but lost 20 pounds and later suffered a nervous breakdown. This film was also nominated for an Oscar, drawing even more attention to the young starlet. Russell played Emily Kimbrough in the 1944 comedy Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. The following year she starred as a schoolteacher opposite Alan Ladd in Salty O'Rouke, another Oscar-nominated film, then with Joel McCrae in the supernatural tale The Unseen. In 1946 she starred in Our Hearts Were Growing Up, a sequel with Diana Lynn. Before the year was over she completed yet another movie, The Bachelor’s Daughters, with Adolphe Menjou. Still, Russell continued to experience stage fright, liberally using alcohol to deal with it. In 1947, Russell performed one of her most famous roles as the innocent Quaker love of John Wayne in The Angel and the Badman. Rumors circulated that Russell and Wayne were having an affair, though they both denied anything more than friendship. In 1949, Russell once again starred as John Wayne's love interest in Wake of the Red Witch. When she learned that her husband had cast Russell in this role, John Wayne’s wife, actress Esperanza (Chata) Bauer, exploded in an alcoholic, jealous rage. When Wayne returned home late from the cast party, Bauer aimed a gun at her husband and pulled the trigger. The bullet barely missed Wayne’s head. Months later, Russell married her long-time boyfriend, television actor Guy Madison. In 1953, Russell was called to testify in John Wayne’s divorce trial and once again, Russell and Wayne both denied the affair. Two weeks later Russell was arrested for drunk driving, which fueled more rumors about an affair and caused serious damage to her marriage. Her alcoholic reputation so troubled Paramount executives they refused to renew her contract. Then Russell and Madison divorced, adding to her despair. In 1955, Russell left the scene of the crime after rear-ending another vehicle while intoxicated. In 1957 she drove her new convertible through the glass windows of Jan's Restaurant in Beverly Hills, pinning the janitor beneath her vehicle. Russell was picked up by Universal Studios and continued to star with some of the most famous names in Hollywood, including Randolph Scott. However, in August of 1957, when she failed to appear in court, officers were sent to her home and found her drunk and unconscious. The hearing was held at General Hospital where she was bedridden with severe effects from alcoholism. She joined Alcoholics Anonymous and stayed with this organization for a year, to no avail. In 1961, Russell starred in her last movie, The Silent Call. When filming was completed, she locked herself in her Los Angeles studio apartment, sketching and drinking. On August 27, 1961 Russell died from an alcohol-induced heart attack. She was just 36.
Tags: actress  Gail  Russell 
Added: 18th December 2010
Views: 4007
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Posted By: Lava1964
Loving Vs Virginia 1967 In June 1958, two residents of Virginia, Mildred Jeter, a black woman, and Richard Loving, a white man, were married in the District of Columbia. Shortly after their marriage, the Lovings returned to Virginia and established their marital abode in Caroline County. That October a grand jury issued an indictment charging the Lovings with violating Virginia's 1924 ban on interracial marriages. On January 6, 1959, the Lovings pleaded guilty to the charge and were sentenced to one year in jail; however, the trial judge suspended the sentence for a period of 25 years on the condition that the Lovings leave the state and not return to Virginia together for 25 years. He stated in an opinion that: 'Almighty God created the races white, black, yellow, malay and red, and he placed them on separate continents. And but for the interference with his arrangement there would be no cause for such marriages. The fact that he separated the races shows that he did not intend for the races to mix.' After their convictions, the Lovings took up residence in the District of Columbia. On November 6, 1963, they filed a motion in the state trial court to vacate the judgment and set aside the sentence on the ground that the statutes which they had violated were repugnant to the Fourteenth Amendment. No decison was rendered for four years. Finally, in 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled (in a 9-0 verdict) that race could not be used as grounds to deny marriage. At the time, 17 U.S. states had laws on the books prohibiting interracial marriages. Richard Loving was killed in a car crash in 1975. Mildred Loving died in 2008.
Tags: civil  law  interracial  marriage 
Added: 17th December 2010
Views: 903
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rare 1913 Liberty Head Nickel In 1913, the Indian Head nickel (commonly known as the buffalo nickel) was introduced, replacing the Liberty Head design that had been used since 1883. These were the first official strikings of nickels in 1913; the United States Mint's official records show no Liberty Head nickels were produced that year. Yet five Liberty Head nickels dated 1913 came to the attention of the numismatic community in 1920. All five were in the possession of Samuel Brown, a coin collector who attended the American Numismatic Association's annual convention and displayed the coins there. Brown had previously placed an advertisement in The Numismatist in December 1919 seeking information on these coins and offering to pay $500 for each. Ostensibly, the coins had been purchased as a result of this offer. However, Brown had been a Mint employee in 1913, so many numismatic historians have concluded that he illegally struck the coins himself and then removed them from the Mint. Other numismatic authorities, however, note there are several methods by which the coins could have been legitimately produced. For instance, they may have been lawfully issued by the Mint's Medal Department 'for cabinet purposes,' or they could be trial pieces struck in late 1912 to test the following year's new coinage dies. In January 1924 Brown sold all five 1913 Liberty Head nickels. The intact lot passed through the hands of several other coin dealers before finally being purchased by Colonel E.H.R. Green. Green kept them in his collection until his death in 1936. When his estate was auctioned, all five of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels were purchased by two dealers, Eric P. Newman and B.G. Johnson. The dealers broke up the set for the first time. The fictional theft of one of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels (known as the Olsen specimen) was the focal point of a December 1973 episode of the popular police drama Hawaii Five-0. It was titled 'The $100,000 Nickel' (which indeed was the value of the coin at the time). Rumors of the existence of a sixth 1913 Liberty Head nickel occasionaly circulate. If one did surface in perfect condition, numismatic experts estimate it could command $20 million at auction. You might want to check your piggy bank...
Tags: numismatics  1913  nickel  rare 
Added: 20th May 2011
Views: 1474
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Posted By: Lava1964
Was Butch Cassidy Really Killed In a scene immortalized by Hollywood in the 1969 film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (played by Paul Newman and Robert Redford), the two outlaws run into a hail of bullets after being cornered by Bolivian troops sometime around 1908. There have always been doubters as to the truth of the twosome's supposed violent end. No solid proof of such a shootout has ever been obtained. Instead, Cassidy is said to have fled to France where he had surgery on his face before sneaking back into the U.S. Furthermore, according to the same account, he lived out his final days quietly and anonymously in Washington State – and wrote an autobiography which he disguised as a biography. In 2011, American rare book expert Brent Ashworth and author Larry Pointer obtained a 200-page manuscript from 1934 called Bandit Invincible: The Story of Butch Cassidy written by a William T. Phillips which they claim was actually written by Cassidy. They claim the book is Cassidy’s own story of his life as an outlaw. It describes how after surviving the shootout in Bolivia he went to Paris and had his face altered then went back to the U.S. and reunited with an old girlfriend, Gertrude Livesay. The authors say they married in Michigan in 1908 and moved to Spokane in Washington state in 1911. He apparently died in 1937, aged 71. One of Cassidy's 12 siblings claimed she saw Butch alive and well in 1924.
Tags: Butch  Cassisdy  death  survival 
Added: 3rd January 2014
Views: 929
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Posted By: Lava1964

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