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Movie Legends Jane Russell Jane Russell was born Ernestine Jane Geraldine Russell in Minn on June 21, 1921. She first became interested in drama in high school, and in 1940, was signed to a seven year contract by millionaire Howard Hughes, who arranged for her motion picture debut in The Outlaw (1943), a story about Billy the Kid that went to great lengths to showcase her voluptuous figure. Although the movie was completed in 1941, it was released for a limited showing two years later. There were problems with the censorship of the production code over the way her ample cleavage was displayed. When the movie was finally passed, it had a general release in 1946. Together with Lana Turner and Rita Hayworth, Russell personified the sensuously contoured sweater girl look and became a popular pin-up with Service men during World War II. She went on to perform in an assortment of roles, which included playing Calamity Jane in The Paleface (1948); Mike Delroy in Son of Paleface (1952), Gentlemen Marry Blondes,The Revolt of Mamie Stover, Fate is the Hunter and many more. Though her screen image was that of a sex goddess, her private life lacked the sensation and scandal that followed other actresses of the time, such as Lana Turner. Although in her autobiography, Jane admitted that she had survived two attempted rapes un-harmed, that her first marriage had been speckled with adultery and violence, and that she had been an alcoholic since she was a teenager. She also revealed that in addition to this, however, she was also a born-again Christian, which was one of the things that had helped her cope. Jane Russell currently lives on the Central Coast of California.
Tags: jane  russell  movie  legends  sex  symbols 
Added: 22nd January 2008
Views: 2815
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Posted By: Naomi
       A Tribute to The Stars who Left Us Too Soon  part1 John Candy (1950-1994) John Ritter (1948-2003) Elvis Presley (1935-1977) Kenneth McMillan (1932-1989) Karen Carpenter (1950-1983) Raymond Burr (1917-1993) Walter Matthau (1920-2000) Roy Orbison (1936-1988) Sorrell Booke (1930-1994) Earl Hindman (1942-2003) Rodney Dangerfield (1921-2004) Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962) Jerry Orbach (1935-2004) Judy Garland (1922-1969) John Wayne (1907-1979) Jack Lemmon (1925-2001) Charles Rocket (1949-2005) James Dean (1931-1955) Natalie Wood (1938-1981) Steve Irwin (1962-2006) Christopher Reeve (1952-2004) Steve McQueen (1930-1980) River Phoenix (1970-1993) George Peppard (1928-1994) Denver Pyle (1920-1997)
Tags: entertainment  actors  actresses   
Added: 1st October 2007
Views: 3512
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Posted By: Guido
A Tribute to The Stars Who Left Us Too Soon part 2 Judy Garland (1922-1969) John Wayne (1907-1979) John Ritter (1948-2003) Elvis Presley (1935-1977) Walter Matthau (1920-2000) Jerry Orbach (1935-2004) John Candy (1950-1994) James Dean (1931-1955) Anthony Quinn (1915-2001) Karen Carpenter (1950-1983) Richard Nixon (1913-1994) Roy Orbison (1936-1988) River Phoenix (1970-1993) Rodney Dangerfield (1921-2004) Jack Lemmon (1925-2001) George Peppard (1928-1994) Steve Irwin (1962-2006) Steve McQueen (1930-1980) Sorrell Booke (1930-1994)
Tags: entertainment    actors    actresses 
Added: 1st October 2007
Views: 2564
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Posted By: Guido
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2059
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Posted By: Lava1964
Anna Taylor Niagara Falls Daredevil On October 24, 1901, Anna Edson Taylor became the first person to plunge over Niagara Falls in a barrel and live to tell about it. The 43-year-old school teacher from Bay City, Michigan had no credentials as a daredevil. Anna could not even swim! She dreamed up the scheme merely as a money-making ploy. She rode in a 160-pound oak barrel. It was only 4-1/2 feet long and just 4 feet in diameter at its widest point. The barrel contained a 100-pound anvil that served as ballast to keep it upright in the water. A crude pump supplied Anna with air. Cushions fastened with leather straps were intended to keep Anna from getting hurt. Seven iron hoops were all that held the barrel together. The stunt was well publicized and several thousand people were on hand to view the event. They watched the barrel descend down the 167-foot waterfall. (It took three seconds.) It remained submerged at the bottom for another 10 seconds. When the barrel was hauled out of the water, Anna emerged bruised and bleeding from a slight cut behind her right ear. She was babbling incoherently for a few moments, but she had survived. Anna attempted to cash in on her achievement with public speaking engagements. However, from all accounts, she spoke in a boring, emotionless, raspy monotone that put audiences to sleep. Furthermore, she stupidly got rid of the barrel--a rather important prop that would have added immensely to her dull lecture. For years afterwards Anna eked out a meager living selling autographs in Niagara Falls beside a facsimile barrel. She died in 1921.
Tags: Anna  Edson  Niagara  Falls  daredevil 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 3922
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fritz Pollard First Black NFL Coach The first black coach in the National Football League was Fritz Pollard who was a player-coach for the Akron Pros during the league's infancy way back in 1921. Pollard lived to a ripe old age: He was 92 when he died in 1986.
Tags: Fritz  Pollard  NFL  coach 
Added: 10th February 2008
Views: 953
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lava Quiz 1927 It's back...by popular demand...the next Lava Quiz! This one deals with the year 1927. Turn back the clock 81 years and give it a try. 1. Who was president of the United States? 2. Who was on the British throne? 3. Gene Tunney defended his world heavyweight title against Jack Dempsey. Who won the fight and why is it so famous? 4. This infamous resident of Fall River, Massachusetts died. Her gravestone simply says 'Lizbeth.' Who was she? 5. The Academy Awards were created. What film won the Oscar for best picture? 6. These two anarchists were executed for a 1921 crime that many people believed they did not commit. Name them. 7. Babe Ruth broke his own record of 59 home runs for a season by swatting 60. Who was the pitcher who surrendered Ruth's historic 60th home run? 8. Charles Lindbergh made history by flying solo across the Atlantic Ocean from New York to Paris. He did so to win a prize. What was the name of the prize and how much money did Lindbergh win? 9. Gutzon Borglum began work on this project on October 4, 1927. What was the project? 10. She was arrested for violating morals laws by appearing in a show called 'Sex' and making suggestive comments. Name her.
Tags: Lava  Quiz  1927 
Added: 14th February 2008
Views: 1254
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Posted By: Lava1964
My Wild Irish Rose for all my Irish Friends Mario Lanza (31 January 1921 to 7 October 1959) was an American tenor and Hollywood film star who enjoyed success in the late 1940s and 1950s. His voice was considered by many to rival that of Enrico Caruso, whom Lanza portrayed in the 1951 film "The Great Caruso." Lanza was able to sing all types of music. While his highly emotional style was not always universally praised by critics, he was immensely popular and his many recordings are still prized today.
Tags: my  wild  irish  rose  mario  lanza 
Added: 17th March 2008
Views: 1582
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Posted By: Naomi
Coogan Law After co-starring in Charlie Chaplin's film The Kid (1921), Jackie Coogan was one of America's first major child stars. Unfortunately, because there was no precedent for a child actor earning thousands of dollars, there were no laws to protect Coogan's financial interests. At the time, minors had absolutely no legal claims to their earnings--every penny belonged to one's parents. Coogan found this out the hard way, when, at age 21 in 1935, he discovered his earnings were almost all gone. Coogan was then put in the awkward position of having to sue his mother and his former agent to recover a small portion of wht he had earned. In response, Congress passed the Coogan Law to protect future child actors' earnings. Unfortunately, the original law contained too many loopholes, renedering it virtually ineffective. Revised versions over the years have been far more effective in protecting the earnings of minors.
Tags: Jackie  Coogan  law 
Added: 6th August 2008
Views: 878
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Posted By: Lava1964
Double Life of Arthur Irwin Toronto's Arthur Irwin was the man who invented the baseball gove. In 1884, while playing with the National League's Providence Grays, Irwin broke two fingers on his catching hand. In order to keep playing, he wore a carriage driver's glove filled with cotton. At first Irwin was derided as a sissy, but within a decade almost all major leaguers were wearing gloves in the field. However, Irwin is most famous for the double life he led as a bigamist--one that only became known after he died. On July 16, 1921, Irwin was aboard a New York to Bston ship, the Calvin Murphy. He told a fellow passenger he was going home to Boston to die. The next morning, Irwin was nowhere to be found. It was surmised that he either jumped or fell overboard. Irwin left behind a grieving wife and family in Boston--and a grieving wife and family in New York City! Neither family had any inkling of the other's existence. Irwin's body was never found, leading to speculation that he had faked his death. For years there were rumors he was living in rural Georgia under an assumed name. Irwin's sister answered the accusations by saying, 'With Arthur, you never know.'
Tags: Arthur  Irwin  bigamist  disappearance 
Added: 16th August 2008
Views: 1671
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Posted By: Lava1964

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