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Exposition Park 1903 World Series I love these old baseball photos. This one was taken during the 1903 World Series at Pittsburgh's Exposition Park. In those days, if every seat in the stadium was sold, standing room tickets were sold in the outfield. The standees were herded behind ropes. Special ground rules had to be created for batted balls that flew or rolled into the standees. During the 1915 World Series, so many balls rolled into the roped-off areas that the practise of selling standing-room outfield tickets was severely questioned.
Tags: baseball  World  Series  Exposition  Park  Pittsburgh 
Added: 20th August 2010
Views: 1390
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Posted By: Lava1964
1915 Anti-Smoking Campaign Tags: 1915  Anti-Smoking  Campaign  Billboard 
Added: 6th October 2010
Views: 1747
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Posted By: Cathy
Barbara Billingsley of Leave it to Beaver fame dies CNN) -- Barbara Billingsley, who wore a classy pearl necklace and dispensed pearls of wisdom as America's quintessential mom on "Leave it to Beaver," has died at age 94, a family spokeswoman said Saturday. The actress passed away at 2 a.m. (5 a.m. ET) Saturday at her home in Santa Monica, California, after a long illness, spokeswoman Judy Twersky said. A private memorial is being planned. "America's favorite mother is now gone. I feel very fortunate to have been her 'son,' " actor Tony Dow, who played Wally Cleaver, said in a statement. "We were wonderful friends and I will miss her very much. My deepest sympathies to her sons, Glenn and Drew, and her entire family." Actor Jerry Mathers, who played Theodore "Beaver" Cleaver, spoke of Billingsley's talent during a 2000 appearance on CNN's "Larry King Live." "Barbara was always a true role model for me. She was a great actress," he said. "And in a lot of ways ... we kind of stifled her, because her true talent didn't really come out in 'Leave it Beaver.' She was like the straight man, but she has an awful lot of talent." The actress won a new legion of fans in a brief but memorable scene in the 1980 send-up movie "Airplane." "Oh, stewardess. I speak jive," Billingsley said in her role as a passenger attempting to comfort an ill man on the flight. From the moment its catchy theme song sounded in black-and-white TV sets of the 1950s, "Leave it to Beaver" enthralled Americans during a time of relative prosperity and world peace. Its characters represented middle-class white America. June Cleaver dutifully pecked her husband, Ward (played by the late Hugh Beaumont), when he came home to learn about the latest foibles -- nothing serious -- committed by Beaver and Wally. The parents would dispense moral advice to their sons. The boys' friends included Lumpy and the obsequious Eddie Haskell, who avoided trouble and often buttered up Ward and June. "That's a lovely dress you're wearing, Mrs. Cleaver," Eddie would typically say to Billingsley's character. Perhaps fittingly, "Leave it to Beaver" was canceled in 1963 on the eve of the JFK assassination, the Vietnam War and the tumult of the 1960s. Born December 22, 1915, in Los Angeles, Billingsley began her career as a model in New York City in 1936. She was under contract to MGM in 1945 before becoming a household name with the launch of "Leave it to Beaver" in 1957. Billingsley is survived by her two sons, Drew Billingsley of Granada Hills, California, and Glenn Billingsley of Phillips Ranch, California. Asked once to compare real-life families to TV families, Billingsley responded, "I just wish that we could have more families like those. Family is so important, and I just don't think we have enough people staying home with their babies and their children."
Tags: Leave  it  to  Beaver  Barbara  Billingsly 
Added: 16th October 2010
Views: 1205
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Posted By: Carl1957
Penny Postcards In 1873 American postmaster John Creswell introduced the first pre-stamped penny postcards. These first postcards depicted the Interstate Industrial Exposition that took place in Chicago that year. The postcards were made because people were looking for an easier way to send quick notes. They were an instant hit with the public. The first postcard to be printed as a souvenir in the United States was created in 1893 to advertise the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The Post Office was the only establishment allowed to print postcards, and it held its monopoly until May 19, 1898, when Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act which allowed private publishers and printers to produce postcards. Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards 'postcards,' so they were instead known as 'souvenir cards.' To adhere to the law, these cards had to be labeled 'Private Mailing Cards.' This prohibition was finally rescinded in December 24, 1901 when private companies could legally use the word 'postcard' as they pleased. The golden age of American postcards lasted until 1915. In 1908 alone, more than 677 million postcards were mailed in the United States. Below is a sample from 1905.
Tags: penny  postcards 
Added: 1st November 2010
Views: 1562
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Posted By: Lava1964
1916 World Series Mascots The boy masocts of the Boston Red Sox and Brooklyn Robins shake hands prior to a 1916 World Series game at Braves Field in Boston--most likely Game One. In that series, the Red Sox chose to play their home games at Braves Field rather than Fenway Park because of the larger seating capacity in the National League ballpark. (They had done the same thing in 1915.) Boston won the 1916 World Series in five games.
Tags: baseball  World  Series  mascots  Braves  Field 
Added: 21st February 2011
Views: 1260
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Posted By: Lava1964
Heavyweight Champion Jess Willard This photo of boxer Jess Willard was taken in Havana, Cuba in 1915. (The 6'6-1/2" Willard is the chap in the center.) When this photo was taken, Willard was about to challenge aging Jack Johnson for the title on April 5. Willard, who was considered enormous by the standards of a century ago, won the coveted crown by stopping Johnson by a knockout in the 26th round of a scheduled 45-round outdoor fight contested at a racetrack under the scorching midday Cuban heat. Men were men back then!
Tags: boxing  Jess  Willard  champion 
Added: 23rd April 2013
Views: 1320
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Grant Memorial Resurfaces Eddie Grant was a Harvard-educated ballplayer who played for four MLB teams between 1906 and 1915. After his baseball career ended, Grant enlisted in the army during the First World War at age 34. He rose to the rank of captain. On October 5, 1918, a few weeks before the war ended, Grant was killed by enemy shell fire in the Argonne Forest. On Memorial Day 1921, the New York Giants, Grant's final MLB team, unveiled an enormous brass plaque that was handsomely mounted on a five-foot granite marker that sat in the deepest part of the Polo Grounds underneath the home team's clubhouse. From the memorial's dedication until the Giants abandoned New York and the Polo Grounds in 1957, a solemn wreath-laying ceremony was held at the Grant monument every year, usually between games of a Memorial Day doubleheader. At the conclusion of the final game played at the Polo Grounds on September 29, 1957, souvenir hunters mobbed the field. The New York Times reported that three teenagers were seen prying the bronze plaque off the monument. Rumors that the police ultimately recovered the plaque were never verified, and its whereabouts remained a mystery for nearly 42 years. In late July 1999, the Eddie Grant Memorial plaque was discovered in the attic of a home in Ho-Ho-Kus Township, NJ. It had been formerly owned by Lena and Gaetano Bucca. The new home owners, Brian and Deborah Lamb, came across the plaque carefully wrapped in a blanket and hidden under a trap door in the attic. Brian Lamb contacted Baseball Reliquary Board member, Wendy Brougalman, a former business associate, with news of the discovery. How did the 100-pound plaque end up in a New Jersey attic? The Lambs purchased the home from the Bucca family after the death of Lena Bucca in 1998. Gaetano Bucca, a former New York City police officer, died in 1974. Gaetano, who retired from the force in January 1958 and subsequently moved with his family to New Jersey, served in the city's 32nd precinct, an area of jurisdiction encompassing the Polo Grounds. It is assumed that that Officer Bucca and a few allies had arranged to take the plaque with the intention of delivering it to the Eddie Grant American Legion Post 1225 in the Bronx. The plaque never made it there. Benjamin Bucca, Gaetano's only surviving son and a respected probate attorney, had no knowledge at all of the 100-pound plaque situated just above his head in his former bedroom. "You know, I never felt comfortable in that bedroom," he said. "Now I know why! That thing could have fallen on my head in the middle of the night and flattened me. My Pop was always a bit of a mystery, but this . . . This is . . . What the hell was he thinking about?'"
Tags: Baseball  Eddie  Grant  Memorial  recovered 
Added: 8th October 2014
Views: 2203
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Posted By: Lava1964
Unknown Chaplin Film Found - Zepped In 2009 a British film buff named Morace Park purchased an old nitrate film canister on eBay for $5. When Park got his purchase he was surprised to find a roll of old silent film inside. He was downright shocked to discover it was a 1916 Charlie Chaplin comedy called Zepped that no one had ever heard of--including his neighbor who was a film historian. It turned out that Zepped was produced without Chaplin's knowledge by using outtakes from three known Chaplin films from 1914 and 1915 along with some animated sequences. The seven-minute film's climax is when Kaiser Wilhelm emerges from a gigantic sausage and Charlie knocks him out--presumably for the sake of bolstering the spirits of Londoners who suffered through sporadic German zeppelin raids during the First World War. Since the initial discovery, two other copies of the film have turned up--and researchers have found documented evidence that Zepped was shown by some British exhibitors in 1916 and 1917. Based on the notations on the film and titles that use the uniquely English term 'blighty,' the film was put together illegally either in Great Britain or Egypt. Who was behind the illegal project will probably never be known for certain.
Tags: Zepped  Charlie  Chaplin  fim 
Added: 2nd March 2015
Views: 981
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tony Wilding - Tennis Champ Killed in WW1 Anthony (Tony) Wilding of New Zealand was the gentlemen's Wimbledon singles champion for four consecutive years (1910 to 1913). After coming through the ranks to win the championship in 1910, he only had to play one match each year to defend it, as the reigning champion was given a bye directly into the final. This system lasted until the early 1920s. Handsome and popular, Wilding is among his country's most successful international athletes ever. One newspaper account said Wilding's "dashing" style of "manly play" had female spectators "swooning." When Wilding lost the 1914 final to Australia's Norman Brookes, many of his female admirers in the stands openly wept. Because of the First World War, the 1914 Wimbledon was the last played until 1919. Wilding enlisted at the outbreak of hostilities in 1914 and was made an officer of a motorized unit in France. On May 9, 1915, Wilding was killed when a German shell exploded on top of the dugout in which he was sitting. He was 31 years old.
Tags: tennis  Tony  Wilding 
Added: 13th March 2015
Views: 938
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Posted By: Lava1964
SS Eastland Disaster - 1915 On Saturday, July 24, 1915 the S.S. Eastland, a Chicago-based passenger steamer ship, welcomed nearly 2,600 people aboard. Most were employees of the Western Electric Company's Hawthorne Works in Cicero, IL and their families. The Eastland was docked at a pier in the Chicago River. Passengers began boarding at 6:30 a.m. Their destination was Michigan City, IN--a three-hour trip across Lake Michigan for a day of fun and recreation at an enormous company picnic. The last passengers boarded the Eastland at about 7:10 a.m. At 7:28 a.m., still tied to the dock, the Eastland took on water, lurched dramatically to its port side (away from the dock) where most of the passengers were standing, and quickly capsized. About one-third of the passengers--844 people--and four crew members were trapped within the doomed ship and were either crushed to death or drowned in 20 feet of water. How did the catastrophe happen? First, the ship was overloaded with both passengers and the weight of additional lifeboats mandated by new maritime safety laws. In previous trips that summer, the Eastland had carried 1,100 passengers at most. Second, renovations and additions to the Eastland has raised its height and dangerously shifted the ship's center of gravity. Third, the Eastland's ballast tanks were initially empty. If they had been filled before the passengers boarded, they could have provided more stable balance for the Eastland. Twenty-two entire families perished in the disaster. One notable person bought a ticket for the Eastland. Fortunately for him, he arrived at the dock too late to board the ship. It was a 20-year-old Western Electric employee George Halas. He had intended to play in the baseball game at the company picnic. Halas, after playing 24 games for the New York Yankees in 1919, would later be one of the key figures in founding the National Football League.
Tags: Eastland  maritime  disaster  Chicago 
Added: 27th April 2017
Views: 723
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Posted By: Lava1964

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