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A Tribute to The Stars Who Left Us Too Soon part 2 Judy Garland (1922-1969) John Wayne (1907-1979) John Ritter (1948-2003) Elvis Presley (1935-1977) Walter Matthau (1920-2000) Jerry Orbach (1935-2004) John Candy (1950-1994) James Dean (1931-1955) Anthony Quinn (1915-2001) Karen Carpenter (1950-1983) Richard Nixon (1913-1994) Roy Orbison (1936-1988) River Phoenix (1970-1993) Rodney Dangerfield (1921-2004) Jack Lemmon (1925-2001) George Peppard (1928-1994) Steve Irwin (1962-2006) Steve McQueen (1930-1980) Sorrell Booke (1930-1994)
Tags: entertainment    actors    actresses 
Added: 1st October 2007
Views: 2026
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Posted By: Guido
Gibson Girl This is what the ideal of female beauty was from about 1895 to 1915. It was the Gibson Girl look--named after artist Charles Dana Gibson. His drawings often illustrated magazine stories of the era. They were likely the first type of mass media to influence the perception of what feminine beauty is. The stereotypical Gibson Girl was tall, had an extreme hourglass figure, with her hair (preferably curly) piled atop her head in a bouffant, pompadour, or chignon style. This photo is of stage actress Camille Clifford who epitomized the Gibson Girl look.
Tags: Gibson  Girl  Camille  Clifford 
Added: 3rd December 2007
Views: 1638
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Posted By: Lava1964
Evelyn Nesbit Scandal 1906 Evelyn Nesbit was a beautiful teenage model at the turn of the twentieth century. She supported herself and her widowed mother by posing for various artists and photographers. Her good looks won her a job as a Broadway chorus girl. This photo of her was taken in 1901 when Evelyn was 16. That same year she caught the eye of renowned architect and womanizer Stanford White--who was 47. White was married, but he often 'befriended' attractive teenage girls. Because of White's wealth and prestige, Evelyn's mother encouraged the relationship. White often 'entertained' young female friends in his lavish tower apartment at Madison Square Garden (which he designed). In the apartment were numerous strategically positioned mirrors and a red velvet swing. White apparently derived much pleasure watching his nubile young ladies cavort on it. According to Nesbit, White took advantage of her one night in the apartment after getting her to pose for suggestive photos in a yellow silk kimono and plying her with champagne. After deflowering Nesbit, White lost interest in her. Nesbit later became involved with Harry Thaw, the son of a Pittsburgh coal and railroad tycoon. Thaw himself was a possessive, sexual sadist who often beat Evelyn. Nevertheless, the two were married in 1905. Thaw became obsessed with Evelyn's stories about White. On June 25, 1906, Evelyn and Harry had two chance encounters with White. The first was at a cafe. The second was at a theatrical performance at Madison Square Garden's roof theatre. Thaw, who always carried a pistol, fired three shots into White's face at close range, killing him instantly. He is said to have shouted, 'You ruined my wife!' Thaw was tried twice for White's murder. The first trial ended with a deadlocked jury. At the second trial Thaw pled temporary insanity. Thaw's mother encouraged Evelyn to testify that White had raped her and Harry shot White to avenge her honor. Evelyn was supposed to get a quickie divorce and $1 million from the Thaw family. The divorce was granted, but Evelyn never got a penny. She was a minor celebrity for a few years and vanished into obscurity. She died in 1967 at the age of 82. Thaw was institutionalized until 1915 and died in 1947. Late in her life Nesbit claimed that Stanford White was the only man she ever truly loved. The story of the scandal was made into a 1955 movie starring Joan Collins titled The Girl In The Red Velvet Swing.
Tags: Evelyn  Nesbit  Stanford  White  Harry  Thaw  scandal 
Added: 15th December 2007
Views: 2575
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Posted By: Lava1964
Wallace Reid Tragedy One of Hollywood's first truly tragic stories centered on the handsome and likable Wallace Ried. Reid was one of the silents screen's biggest stars from 1919 to 1922. Hailing from a showbiz family, he initially hoped to be a film director. At age 19 Reid took a script his father had written to Vitagraph Studios. The studio recognized Reid's potential as a sex symbol and cast him as an actor. The versatile Reid often worked as a director, writer, and even as a cameraman. He was featured in two of D.W. Griffith's epics: Birth of a Nation (1915) and Intolerance (1916). Reid also appeared as a dashing race car driver in several Famous Player films, becoming a major cinema heartthrob. While making The Valley of the Giants (1919), Reid was injured in a train wreck. The studio gave Reid morphine injections for the pain so he could continue working. Because Reid was so valuable, his studio kept providing him with more and more morphine so he could keep making movies. Reid quickly became deeply addicted but there was virtually no drug-addiction help in those days. By 1922, Reid's health was in tatters. He died on January 18, 1923 at age 31. His widow, Dorothy Davenport, made a film about drug addiction titled Human Wreckage and toured with it to raise national awareness of the dangers of morphine.
Tags: Wallace  Reid 
Added: 16th December 2007
Views: 1008
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Posted By: Lava1964
Thurston The Great 1915 the spirits do come back, if you stay for the second show. 1915 poster advertising an appearance by the magician Howard Thurston (1869-1936), the "King of Cards" . . .
Tags: vintage      poster      Thurston  The  Great      Howard  Thurston 
Added: 9th May 2008
Views: 648
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Posted By: Teresa
Jack Johnson World Heavyweight Champion The first black boxer to hold the world heavyweight title was Jack Johnson of Galveston, Texas. Johnson held the crown from 1908 through 1915. A superb defensive fighter, he would sometimes go through several rounds without his opponent landing a meaningful punch. When he beat Canada's Tommy Burns for the title in Australia in 1908, correspondent Jack London wrote, 'Not one second of any round could legitimately be scored for Burns.' Johnson so outclassed his opposition that his title reign inspired the Great White Hope movement in America to find someone with the proper pigmentation to beat him. Nat Fleischer, who edited The Ring magazine from 1922 through 1972, rated Johnson as the greatest heavyweight ever.
Tags: Jack  Johnson  heavyweight  champion 
Added: 6th February 2008
Views: 870
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Posted By: Lava1964
Christmas Shoppers sometime between 1910 and 1915 . . .
Tags: vintage      photo 
Added: 4th May 2008
Views: 710
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Posted By: Teresa
Sinking of RMS Lusitania 1915 The RMS Lusitania was a British passenger liner that was torpedoed in the First World War by the German submarine U-20 off the coast of Ireland on May 7, 1915. It sank in just 18 minutes. A total of 1,198 of 1,959 passengers perished, including 128 of the 197 Americans on board. Despite the large number of American casualties, U.S. president Woodrow Wilson only issued a formal complaint to the German government. He was heavily criticized in the British press for not declaring war. For years the British government insisted the Lusitania contained no war material, but a dive in 2006 found stores of ammunition. (Thus it was a legitimate war target for German submarines.) There is only one remaining Lusitania survivor, a 93-year-old Englishwoman, who was just three months old when the ship was sunk. The last American survivor died on April 12, 2008.
Tags: Lusitania  sinking 
Added: 28th April 2008
Views: 743
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Posted By: Lava1964
Willard-Johnson Fight 1915 This is must-see footage for boxing fans: Jess Willard's heavyweight title victory over reigning champion Jack Johnson on April 5, 1915 in Havana, Cuba. For years Johnson claimed he had thrown the fight for a $50,000 payoff. However, I believe the film shows 'White Hope' Willard's knockout victory to be totally legitimate.
Tags: boxing  Willard  Johnson   
Added: 22nd April 2008
Views: 817
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Posted By: Lava1964
1915 Scottish Railroad Disaster The worst railroad disaster in history occurred on May 22, 1915 near Gretna Green, Dumfriesshire, Scotland. It is commonly known as the Quintinshill Disaster, having been named for the location of a nearby intermediate signal box with passing loops on each side on the Caledonian Railway Main Line linking Glasgow and Carlisle. The crash, which involved five trains, killed a probable 226 people and injured 246 others. Those killed were mainly territorial soldiers from the Royal Scots heading for Gallipoli front in the First World War. The precise number of dead was never established with certainty as the roll list of the regiment was destroyed by the fire. The crash occurred when a troop train travelling from Larbert, Stirlingshire to Liverpool, Lancashire collided with a local passenger train that had been shunted on to the main line, to then be hit by an express train to Glasgow which crashed into the wreckage a minute later. Gas from the lighting system of the old wooden carriages of the troop train ignited, starting a fire which soon engulfed the three passenger trains and also two goods trains standing on nearby passing loops. A number of bodies were never recovered, having been wholly consumed by the fire. The bodies that were recovered were buried together in a mass grave in Edinburgh's Rosebank Cemetery. Such was the scope of the disaster that many of the rescuers wrongly assumed the trains had been targets of German saboteurs. Four bodies, believed to be of children, were never identified or claimed and are buried in the Western Necropolis, Glasgow. The cause of the accident was poor working practices on the part of the two signalmen involved. It was discovered that the two men often colluded to falsify their records of when they relieved each other, routinely did not follow regulations properly, and engaged in other unsafe practices. The results of the official inquiry into the disaster led to their imprisonment for culpable homicide after legal proceedings in both Scotland and England. A memorial to the dead soldiers was erected soon after the accident. There are a number of more recent memorials at various locations. An annual remembrance service is held at Rosebank Cemetery.
Tags: Scotland  1915  train  disaster 
Added: 13th December 2014
Views: 57
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Posted By: Lava1964

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