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Fred Snodgrass Obituary Below is a 1974 New York Times obituary for baseball player Fred Snodgrass. Snodgrass was the New York Giants' usually sure-handed center fielder. But during the deciding game of the 1912 World Series versus the Boston Red Sox, Snodgrass dropped a routine fly ball that led to a Red Sox comeback victory. Sixty-two years later, that error was still paramount in baseball fans' minds.
Tags: obituary  baseabll  Fred  Snograss  error 
Added: 14th March 2011
Views: 2516
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rare 1913 Liberty Head Nickel In 1913, the Indian Head nickel (commonly known as the buffalo nickel) was introduced, replacing the Liberty Head design that had been used since 1883. These were the first official strikings of nickels in 1913; the United States Mint's official records show no Liberty Head nickels were produced that year. Yet five Liberty Head nickels dated 1913 came to the attention of the numismatic community in 1920. All five were in the possession of Samuel Brown, a coin collector who attended the American Numismatic Association's annual convention and displayed the coins there. Brown had previously placed an advertisement in The Numismatist in December 1919 seeking information on these coins and offering to pay $500 for each. Ostensibly, the coins had been purchased as a result of this offer. However, Brown had been a Mint employee in 1913, so many numismatic historians have concluded that he illegally struck the coins himself and then removed them from the Mint. Other numismatic authorities, however, note there are several methods by which the coins could have been legitimately produced. For instance, they may have been lawfully issued by the Mint's Medal Department 'for cabinet purposes,' or they could be trial pieces struck in late 1912 to test the following year's new coinage dies. In January 1924 Brown sold all five 1913 Liberty Head nickels. The intact lot passed through the hands of several other coin dealers before finally being purchased by Colonel E.H.R. Green. Green kept them in his collection until his death in 1936. When his estate was auctioned, all five of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels were purchased by two dealers, Eric P. Newman and B.G. Johnson. The dealers broke up the set for the first time. The fictional theft of one of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels (known as the Olsen specimen) was the focal point of a December 1973 episode of the popular police drama Hawaii Five-0. It was titled 'The $100,000 Nickel' (which indeed was the value of the coin at the time). Rumors of the existence of a sixth 1913 Liberty Head nickel occasionaly circulate. If one did surface in perfect condition, numismatic experts estimate it could command $20 million at auction. You might want to check your piggy bank...
Tags: numismatics  1913  nickel  rare 
Added: 20th May 2011
Views: 1806
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Posted By: Lava1964
Billy West - Chaplin Impersonator Billy West (September 22, 1892 - July 21, 1975) was an actor, producer, and director of the silent film era. He is best known as a terrific Charlie Chaplin impersonator. Born Roy B. Weissburg in Russia, West adopted his professional name some time after emigrating to America. He appeared in many short films, first in Apartment No. 13 in 1912. In 1917 movie theaters couldn't get enough Charlie Chaplin comedies, and an enterprising producer hired West, who had been doing comic pantomimes on the vaudeville stage, to make imitation-Chaplin subjects to meet the demand. West, wearing the identical tramp costume and makeup, copied Chaplin's movements and gestures so accurately that modern audiences often mistake West for the genuine performer. Chaplin himself saw the Billy West company filming on a Hollywood street, and allegedly told West, 'You're a damned good imitator.' Some West comedies were later deceitfully re-released on the home-movie market as 'Charlie Chaplin' pictures. Most of the West comedies of 1917-18 resembled the Chaplin comedies of 1916-17, with Oliver Hardy approximating the villainy of Eric Campbell, and Leatrice Joy in the Edna Purviance ingenue role.
Tags: silent  films  Billy  west  Chaplin  impersonator 
Added: 7th July 2011
Views: 1745
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Posted By: Lava1964
Elizabeth Ann Roberts 16-year-old Playboy Playmate Elizabeth Ann Roberts, Playboy magazine's Playmate of the Month for January 1958, looked like a high school student--because she was! Born in August 1941, the pretty 16-year-old showed up for her photo shoot with a note signed by her mother (who actually accompanied Elizabeth!). Mom's note gave the okay for her daughter to pose for Playboy and also attested that Elizabeth was not a minor. Roberts appeared in a pictorial salaciously titled "Schoolmate Playmate." Her elegant but very youthful appearance prompted an investigation. Charges were laid in Chicago against both Playboy impresario Hugh Hefner and Elizabeth's mother for "contributing to the delinquency of a minor." The charge against Hefner was later dropped when it could not be proved that Hefner knew Roberts' real age. Had the case proceeded to court, Hefner was prepared to argue that the girl who posed nude for the famous 1912 painting September Morn was only 15. Roberts later worked as a bunny in Chicago's Playboy Club. There have been at least seven Playboy Playmates of the Month who were under 18 years of age. Almost all appeared before 1967 when previously vague laws pertaining to modelling for art, erotica, and pornography were clarified and tightened. One exception was the spectacularly well endowed Cynthia Myers (Playmate from December 1968): She was only 17 when she posed, but she had turned 18 by the time her photos were published. It took until 1984 for Playboy to officially institute a minimum age of 18 for its models.
Tags: Elizabeth  Ann  Roberts  Playboy  Playmate  underage 
Added: 20th September 2011
Views: 32024
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Posted By: Lava1964
Aloysius Travers - Emergency Pitcher One of the most interesting pitching lines in MLB history belongs to Aloysius (Al) Travers, a 20-year old seminary student, who pitched once for the Detroit Tigers in 1912--a complete-game 24-2 loss to the defending World Series champion Philadelphia A's. Of course there has to be an explanation: Travers wasn't really a pitcher! He was hastily recruited among a group of local Philadelphia amateur ballplayers to replace the striking Detroit Tigers. The Tigers' regulars walked off the field shortly before game time at Philadelphia's Shibe Park on Saturday, May 18, 1912 to protest the suspension of center fielder Ty Cobb. (Cobb had jumped into the stands during a game in New York three days earlier to fight a heckler.) Faced with a potential forfeit and a huge fine, the Tigers' management recruited Travers and other amateur players as emergency replacements. Travers was the ersatz Tigers' only pitcher--and he wasn't even good enough to make the baseball team at St. Joseph's College. Be that as it may, Travers was forced to face some of the most vaunted hitters in the majors in front of 20,000 fans. In eight innings, he allowed 24 runs (14 earned), and 26 hits. Travers also walked seven A's and struck out one. He was paid $25 for his efforts. Travers, shown here in a photograph taken late in his life, eventually became a priest. To date, Travers is the only priest known to have pitched in an MLB game.
Tags: baseball  Aloysius  Travers  Detroit  Tigers 
Added: 18th July 2012
Views: 2632
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Posted By: Lava1964
Avery Brundage Avery Brundage was the only American ever to become president of the International Olympic Committee--a position he held from 1952 to 1972. He was also the most controversial IOC head. Brundage had competed at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics in the decathlon and pentathlon. He later acquired significant wealth from his contruction company combined with some shrewd investments. His vast fortune skewed his views of amateurism. Since he was independently wealthy, he could not see why every other amateur athlete could not be self-sufficient too. As a result, Brundage believed the only true athletes were amateurs. He denounced pro athletes as entertainers. Brundage rose to become head of the United States Olympic Committee by 1936. That year he controversially allowed the American team to compete in the Berlin Olympics despite heavy public pressure to boycott the Nazi-themed Games. He personally disqualified one notable female American athlete, swimmer Eleanor Holm, for allegedly engaging in immoral behavior on the team's ocean voyage to Hamburg. (Years later Holm claimed she had rebuffed the married Brundage's advances and he suspended her out of spite.) After the 1936 Games, Brundage openly praised Nazi Germany's economic resurgence and newfound national pride. By 1952 he became head of the IOC and a staunch defender of pure amateur sports, saying that the ideal Olympian should be a Renaissance person with many interests--not just the financial benefits of being a pro athlete. Critics labelled him "Slavery Avery." Despite being anti-communist, Brundage was impressed by the Soviet Union's national physical fitness programs and was instrumental in getting the USSR into the Olympic movement. Brundage was still at the helm of the IOC at age 85 in 1972 when a terrorist attack killed 11 Israeli team members. Brundage called for a day of mourning and then insisted the Games continue-- a decision still controversial today. In one of his final public speeches as IOC head, Brundage favored abolishing the Winter Olympics because of their growing commercialization. He died in 1975.
Tags: Avery  Brundage  IOC 
Added: 5th February 2013
Views: 1404
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Posted By: Lava1964
1912 Olympics - Standing Long Jump The summer Olympics used to include standing jumping events: long jump, high jump and triple jump. Here's a film clip of the standing long jump competition from the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, Sweden. The 1912 Games were the last Olympics to feature standing jump disciplines. Norway is the last remaining country to feature them in their own national athletics championships. The United States Air Force Academy and Canada's Royal Military College still use the standing long jump as a way to gauge the physical fitness levels of their students.
Tags: 1912  Olympics  standing  long  jump 
Added: 9th November 2014
Views: 1052
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Posted By: Lava1964

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