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Adam Adamant Lives Adam Adamant Lives!started in 1966. The main character, Adam Llewellyn De Vere Adamant, was a swashbuckling Edwardian Gentleman Adventurer, frozen in a block of ice in 1902 by his arch-nemesis 'The Face' and revived in 1966. it starred Gerald Harper.
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Added: 13th July 2007
Views: 1866
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Posted By: konifur
The Automat The first automat in the U.S. was opened 1902 in Philadelphia. The automat was brought to New York City in 1912 and gradually became part of popular culture in northern industrial cities.
Tags: Automat   
Added: 16th July 2007
Views: 2063
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Posted By: Cliffy
Loie Fuller  1902 Mary Louise Fuller (Loie) was an American dancer and theatrical innovator. She began her career as a child, performing in burlesque, vaudeville, the circus, plays, and other popular entertainments. Self-taught as a dancer, Fuller explored the use of voluminous silken skirts, which, illuminated by the multicolored lighting she created, floated, flowed, and swirled in her famous Serpentine Dance, first performed in New York in 1892. Later that year she traveled to Paris, where she and her dance productions became wildly successful. She was painted by Toulouse-Lautrec, sculpted by Rodin, exalted by Mallarmé and other writers, and dramatically portrayed in various art nouveau works. Remaining in Europe, Fuller became a successful artistic entrepeneur, forming her own school (1908) and founding a troupe that toured worldwide. She continued to experiment with lighting effects and other forms of stagecraft, and ultimately choreographed more than 100 dances...
Tags: vintage      photo      Loie  Fuller 
Added: 8th May 2008
Views: 1589
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Posted By: Teresa
Last Boer War Survivor George Ives, age 111, was interviewed in Canada by the BBC in 1992. Ives was the last surviving soldier of the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902). He was feted by the British government and participated in the 1992 Remembrance Day ceremonies in London. Ives died in April 1993.
Tags: Boer  War  George  Ives 
Added: 3rd March 2009
Views: 1274
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Posted By: Lava1964
Turn of the Century Fun this roller coaster photograph was taken in Atlantic City in 1902 . . faded, but still fun!
Tags: vintage    photo      rollter    coaster    atlantic    city 
Added: 5th September 2009
Views: 1400
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Posted By: Teresa
A Glimpse of Time From 1902 An amazing visual record of everyday life in Britain at the beginning of the twentieth century. For more information about the films of Mitchell and Kenyon see http://www.bfi.org.uk/features/mk/
Tags: Edwardian  Lifestyle        Bradford  Yorkshire    Trams 
Added: 17th December 2010
Views: 1800
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Posted By: Old Fart
Tinker to Evers to Chance Back in the day when sports writing was at its gaudy peak, scribes often used poetry in their description of people and events. The most famous sports poem is likely this one penned by Franklin P. Adams: These are the saddest of possible words: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double – Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' This work was first published as 'That Double Play Again' in the July 12, 1910, New York Evening Mail. The Chicago Daily Tribune reprinted it as 'Gotham's Woe' on July 15, 1910. Three days later, on July 18, the New York Evening Mail republished it under the title by which it is best known today, 'Baseball's Sad Lexicon.' It described the double-play artistry of Chicago Cubs when the team was in its heyday in the first decade of the 20th century. (Yes, the Cubs actually had a heyday.) Second baseman Joe Tinker, shortstop Johnny Evers, and first baseman Frank Chance first played together in 1902. Although the poetic lament was accurate, the Cubs' famed trio never came close to leading the National League in double plays at any time. Nevertheless all three were inducted into the Hall of fame in 1946 largely because of Franklin Adams' doggerel. Based on sheer statistics, probably only Frank Chance deserves to be there. Although all three ballplayers are long dead, their double play prowess has been referenced in numerous literary works, movies, and TV shows as varied as Hogan's Heroes and The Brady Bunch.
Tags: baseball  Tinker  Evers  Chance  Chicago  Cubs 
Added: 4th January 2011
Views: 1902
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Posted By: Lava1964
George Davis - Vanishing Baseball Superstar George Stacey Davis was one of the finest shortstops in Major League Baseball history. He enjoyed a 20-year MLB career from 1890 through 1909. Blessed with a strong arm and an excellent batting eye, Davis was a perennial star for the New York Giants during the late 19th and early 20th century. A switch-hitter, Davis compiled 2,688 career hits and 615 stolen bases. He still holds the Giants' club record for the longest hitting streak (36 games). So valuable was Davis to the Giants that he became one of the controversial figures in the war between the National and American Leagues when he jumped to the Chicago White Stockings of the AL in 1902. Once Davis' playing career ended, he coached Amherst College's baseball team, managed a bowling alley, and sold automobiles for a time. Then he vanished. For decades many noteworthy baseball historians rated Davis as the best player not in the Hall of Fame--and no one seemed to know what had happened to him. In 1968, Lee Allen, the historian at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, wrote an article for The Sporting News in which he asked for any information about Davis' later years and death. A woman claiming to be Davis' niece replied. She put Allen in touch with Davis' estranged sister who suggested Allen should check the records of state hospitals in Pennsylvania. Allen eventually found Davis' death certificate. He had died in a Philadelphia mental institution in 1940 at the age of 70. He had lived there for six years, suffering from the effects of syphilis. Records showed his wife paid $41 to have him quickly interred in a pauper's grave. In 1998 Davis was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame by the Veterans' Committee. For the only time in the Hall of Fame's history, no living relative could be found to accept a deceased inductee's plaque at the induction ceremony, although 50 fans from Davis' hometown of Cohoes, NY were present. The purchase of a handsome headstone for Davis' previously unmarked grave was financed by the Society for American Baseball Research shortly after Davis was enshrined in Cooperstown.
Tags: baseball  George  Davis  vanished  syphilis  Hall  of  Fame 
Added: 31st December 2015
Views: 669
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Posted By: Lava1964
Theodore Roosevelt - Near Fatal Carriage Accident On September 3, 1902, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt and several other prominent politicians came within inches of being killed by a speeding trolley car in Pittsfield, MA. The president, riding in a horse-drawn carriage, was on his way to deliver a speech when the accident occurred. The carriage was knocked about 40 feet upon impact. Secret Service agent William Craig was fatally injured, becoming the first Secret Service agent killed in the line of duty. Roosevelt was knocked from the carriage and landed face first upon the street. He suffered superficial wounds to his face and leg. (The seriousness of Roosevelt's injuries was probably understated. Roosevelt's leg wound became infected and abscessed. He required surgery and was confined to a wheelchair for a short time. Although the leg wound healed completely, Roosevelt was bothered by the aftereffects of his injury for the rest of his life.) David J. Pratt, the driver of the carriage containing the president, was severely injured. George B. Cortelyou, Secretary to the President, was severely bruised. Winthrop Murray Crane, Governor of Massachusetts, and George P. Lawrence, Representative in Congress from the First Massachusetts district, escaped with only a few bruises. All were in the carriage with Mr. Roosevelt. A newspaper account said, "Under the sunniest of September skies the distinguished party was driving through the Berkshire Hills in a landau drawn by four white horses, the reins handled by Pratt, the President and his companions going from Dalton to Lenox. The carriage was struck squarely just behind the box on which Pratt and Craig were sitting. The vehicle was hurled 40 feet across the road. Craig was instantly killed and ground under the heavy machinery of the car into an unrecognizable mass. The President was thrown into the air and landed on the right side of his face in the roadway. Mr. Cortelyou was thrown out and almost rendered unconscious. Gov. Crane, who, next to Craig, was the nearest to the immediate danger line, was thrown out, but...escaped with only slight bruises." No one on the trolley was injured. According to reports, the trolley was speeding in an attempt to get to its destination ahead of Roosevelt's carriage. Euclid Madden was the trolley car's motorman. He received a six-month prison term for his role in the accident. James Kelley was the trolley car's conductor. In 2002, on the hundredth anniversary of the accident, the Secret Service held a special ceremony at agent Craig's grave where a marker was placed.
Tags: Theodore  Roosevelt  1902  accident  carriage  trolley 
Added: 16th September 2014
Views: 3779
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Posted By: Lava1964

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