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Dem Bums  The Brooklyn Dodgers Established in 1883, the team originated in Brooklyn, New York, where it was known as the Brooklyn Dodgers, before moving to Los Angeles before the 1958 season; which is why I posted it in 1950s.
Tags: Dem  Bums    The  Brooklyn  Dodgers 
Added: 16th September 2007
Views: 1692
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Posted By: Old Fart
The Polo Grounds The Polo Grounds was the home stadium for baseball's New York Giants from 1883 to 1957. There were actually four stadiums that were called The Polo Grounds. This is the last and most famous. Its horseshoe shape created some odd dimensions. The foul lines ran for a mere 257 feet but the the distant center field bleachers were 505 feet away from home plate. This ballpark was where Willie Mays made his spectacular catch during the 1954 World Series and where Bobby Thomson hit baseball's most famous home run in 1951. Oh, yes: The first stadium was built for polo in 1876, but after the Giants acquired it for baseball in 1883, no polo matches were ever played there again.
Tags: Polo  Grounds  baseball 
Added: 27th June 2008
Views: 1113
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Posted By: Lava1964
Krakatoa Erupts 1883 The beginning of the amazing events at Krakatoa in 1883 date to May 20 when there were initial rumblings and venting from the volcano, which had been dormant for about 200 years. Over the next three months, there were regular small blasts from Krakatoa out of three vents. On August 11, ash started spewing from the small mountain. Eruptions got progressively stronger until August 26, when the catastrophe began. At noon, the volcano sent an ash cloud 20 miles into the air and tremors triggered several tsunamis. This turned out to be just a small indication, however, of what would follow the next day. For four-and-a-half hours beginning at 5:30 a.m. on August 27, there were four major and incredibly powerful eruptions. The last of these made the loudest sound ever recorded on the planet. It could be heard as far away as central Australia and the island of Rodrigues, 3,000 miles from Krakatoa. The air waves created by the eruption were detected at points all over the earth. The eruption had devastating effects on the islands near Krakatoa. It set off tremendous tsunamis that overwhelmed hundreds of villages on the coasts of Java and Sumatra. Water pushed inland several miles in certain places, with coral blocks weighing 600 tons ending up on shore. At least 35,000 people died, though exact numbers were impossible to determine. The tsunamis traveled nearly around the world--unusually high waves were noticed thousands of miles away the next day. The volcano threw so much rock, ash and pumice into the atmosphere that, in the immediate area, the sun was virtually blocked out for a couple of days. Within a couple of weeks, the sun appeared in strange colors to people all over the world because of all the fine dust in the stratosphere. Over the ensuing three months, the debris high in the sky produced vivid red sunsets. In one case, fire engines in Poughkeepsie, New York, were dispatched when people watching a sunset were sure that they were seeing a fire in the distance. Further, there is speculation that Edvard Munch's 1893 painting "The Scream" depicting a psychedelic sunset may have actually been a faithful rendering of what Munch saw in Norway in the years following the eruption of Krakatoa. The amount of dust in the atmosphere also filtered enough sun and heat that global temperatures fell significantly for a couple of years. Krakatoa was left only a tiny fraction of its former self. However, in the intervening years, a small island, Anak Krakatoa ("Son of Krakatoa") has arisen from the sea. It is growing at an average of five inches every week. This island is receiving a great deal of scientific attention, as it represents a chance to see how island ecosystems are established from scratch.
Tags: History 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 545
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Alferd G Packer - Cannibal The only person in American history to be convicted of cannibalism was Alferd (sometimes written 'Alfred') G. Packer. Packer, a Civil War veteran, was one of 21 prospectors who intended to try their luck in the Colorado gold fields. The group got to Provo, Utah in February 1874. Against the advice of the locals, Packer and five others decided to continue their trek across the Rocky Mountains in the dead of winter. They quickly got lost and ran out of provisions. Packer was the only survivor. Two months later Packer was seen by other members of the original prospectors' group who didn't believe his story that his companions never returned from a search for food. Packer eventually confessed to cannibalism, escaped custody twice, but was found in Wyoming in 1883. Packer was sentenced to 40 years in jail. He was paroled by Colorado's governor in 1901 and died six years later at age 65. In 1968, as a gag, students at the University of Colorado at Boulder voted to name their school cafeteria the Alferd G. Packer Memorial Grill. It bears the slogan, 'Have a friend for lunch!' A statue of Packer was erected on campus in 1982.
Tags: Alferd  G  Packer  cannibalism 
Added: 14th October 2009
Views: 1169
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Posted By: Lava1964
1883 No-Cents Nickels In 1883, the United States unveiled its new 'Liberty Head' five-cent piece. Conmen immediately sensed an opportunity: Because the reverse bore the Roman numeral 'V' without the word 'cents,' it looked very much like the widely circulated five-dollar gold piece. Crooks simply painted the nickels gold and passed them off as five-dollar coins. To combat this practise, a few months later the mint issued a revised variety of 1883 nickels--these ones bearing the word 'cents' beneath the V. (That design lasted until the Liberty Head nickel was replaced by the buffalo nickel in 1913.) According to numismatic lore, a deaf mute named Josh Tatum was among the most prolific perpetrators of fraud with gold-painted no-cents nickels. He supposedly escaped conviction because he could not ask shopkeepers for change; he merely accepted what was given to him. This is where the verb 'to josh' is said to have originated.
Tags: 1883  nickels  numismatics 
Added: 22nd October 2009
Views: 830
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Posted By: Lava1964
Invention of Standard Time It seems hard to believe, but not until the 1880s did North America have recognized standard time zones. Instead, each individual city generally set its own time according to the position of the sun. This system didn't cause much trouble until the railroad age blossomed--then chaos ensued. Because the clocks in cities even a few miles apart routinely varied, running a railroad became a nightmare. (For example, in Canada, Montreal was 22 minutes ahead of Toronto because it is 500 kilometres further to the northeast.) In 1879, a Scottish-born Canadian railway man, Sandford Fleming (pictured here), actively proposed time zones to simplify North American railroad schedules. These were adopted in 1883. Almost immediately, the various cities and states followed the railroaders' lead. Soon the rest of world followed too. There are now 24 basic time zones in the world, each encompassing approximately 15 degrees longitude.
Tags: standard  time  geography  Sandford  Fleming 
Added: 8th March 2010
Views: 1025
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rare 1913 Liberty Head Nickel In 1913, the Indian Head nickel (commonly known as the buffalo nickel) was introduced, replacing the Liberty Head design that had been used since 1883. These were the first official strikings of nickels in 1913; the United States Mint's official records show no Liberty Head nickels were produced that year. Yet five Liberty Head nickels dated 1913 came to the attention of the numismatic community in 1920. All five were in the possession of Samuel Brown, a coin collector who attended the American Numismatic Association's annual convention and displayed the coins there. Brown had previously placed an advertisement in The Numismatist in December 1919 seeking information on these coins and offering to pay $500 for each. Ostensibly, the coins had been purchased as a result of this offer. However, Brown had been a Mint employee in 1913, so many numismatic historians have concluded that he illegally struck the coins himself and then removed them from the Mint. Other numismatic authorities, however, note there are several methods by which the coins could have been legitimately produced. For instance, they may have been lawfully issued by the Mint's Medal Department 'for cabinet purposes,' or they could be trial pieces struck in late 1912 to test the following year's new coinage dies. In January 1924 Brown sold all five 1913 Liberty Head nickels. The intact lot passed through the hands of several other coin dealers before finally being purchased by Colonel E.H.R. Green. Green kept them in his collection until his death in 1936. When his estate was auctioned, all five of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels were purchased by two dealers, Eric P. Newman and B.G. Johnson. The dealers broke up the set for the first time. The fictional theft of one of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels (known as the Olsen specimen) was the focal point of a December 1973 episode of the popular police drama Hawaii Five-0. It was titled 'The $100,000 Nickel' (which indeed was the value of the coin at the time). Rumors of the existence of a sixth 1913 Liberty Head nickel occasionaly circulate. If one did surface in perfect condition, numismatic experts estimate it could command $20 million at auction. You might want to check your piggy bank...
Tags: numismatics  1913  nickel  rare 
Added: 20th May 2011
Views: 1340
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gene Stephens 3-Hit Inning On June 18, 1953, 20-year-old Gene Stephens collected three hits in one inning for the Boston Red Sox during a 23-3 victory over the Detroit Tigers at Fenway Park. The Bosox exploded for 17 runs in the seventh inning - sending 23 batters to the plate during their 47-minute half of the frame. Stephens had a double and two singles off three different Detroit pitchers. The 17 runs scored by Boston in that inning were two more than the previous modern MLB record, set by the Brooklyn Dodgers in a May 21, 1952, contest against the Cincinnati Reds. The Red Sox had 14 hits in their memorable inning to set a new modern MLB mark in that category. Gene Stephens was mostly a reserve player in his 12 MLB seasons. His batting average was only .204 in 1953, making his three-hit inning on June 18 even more surprising. The Red Sox led 5-3 going into their half of the seventh inning. Detroit pitcher Steve Gromek allowed nine of the 17 runs while Dick Weik and Earl Harrist each allowed four. Boston had 27 total hits in the game. The day before, they had 20 hits when they walloped Detroit 17-1. “I was the youngest ballplayer in the major leagues at the time,” Stephens recalled years later, whose three-hit performance was witnessed by only 3,108 Fenway fans that afternoon. “I probably shouldn’t have even been in the major leagues at that time. Ted Williams had gone to the Korean War and, therefore, that gave me the opportunity to play. As soon as [Williams] came back, the Red Sox optioned me down to their AAA team in Louisville." The all-time record for most runs scored in an inning is 18, set by the Chicago White Stockings against the Detroit Wolverines on Sept. 6, 1883, in a National League affair. During that onslaught (also in the seventh inning), three different Chicago players had three hits in the frame: Tommy Burns (two doubles, one home run), Fred Pfeffer (two singles, one double), and Ned Williamson (two singles, one double). The only other hitter in modern MLB history (since 1900) with three hits in one inning was Johnny Damon, who was also a member of the Boston Red Sox. Damon achieved his feat when Boston whipped the Florida Marlins 25-8 on June 27, 2003. Damon collected three hits (a single, double, and triple) in the first inning as the Bosox scored a record 10 runs before any Boston batter was put out.
Tags: baseball  Gene  Stephens  hits  Red  Sox 
Added: 27th May 2012
Views: 1687
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Posted By: Lava1964
Giants Final Game at Polo Grounds On September 29, 1957, the famous New York Giants baseball team--once the most feared outfit in the National League--played their final game at the Polo Grounds before about 11,000 nostalgic fans. The Giants had represented New York City in the NL since 1883 and had played their home games at four different ballparks known as the Polo Grounds since 1891. Once the city's sports darlings, the Giants had slowly become second bananas to the more glamorous Yankees since the 1920s. One embittered journalist declared, "The real baseball fans in New York supported the Giants. We left the Yankees for the tourists." The Giants lost that last game 9-1 to Pittsburgh. Once the final out was made, fans stormed the field to voice their displeasure with owner Horace Stoneham who had arranged to move the club to San Francisco for the 1958 season. Stoneham wisely did not make an appearance.
Tags: New  York  Giants  MLB  final  game  Polo  Grounds 
Added: 10th May 2013
Views: 1733
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Posted By: Lava1964

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