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Notre Dame Four Horsemen 1924 Notre Dame defeated Army 13-7 in a college football game on October 18, 1924. Grantland Rice of the New York Herald-Tribune began his eloquent report this way: 'Outlined against a blue-grey October sky, the Four Horsemen rode again. In dramatic lore they are known as famine, pestilence, destruction and death. These are only aliases. Their real names are Stuhldreher, Miller, Crowley and Layden. They formed the crest of the South Bend cyclone before which another fighting Army team was swept over the precipice at the Polo Grounds this afternoon as 55,000 spectators peered down upon the bewildering panorama spread out upon the green plain below.' Rice's article was terrific, but what really made Notre Dame's Four Horsemen famous was this photograph. Once the victorious Irish arrived back on campus, team publicity man George Strickler posed Harry Stuhldreher, Don Miller, Jim Crowley, and Elmer Layden atop horses borrowed from a local livery stable. The photograph was widely circulated and Notre Dame's 1924 backfield became legendary.
Tags: Notre  Dame  Four  Horsemen 
Added: 16th June 2008
Views: 2106
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Posted By: Lava1964
Posted by: Lava1964 on 2008-06-16 
Sports reporters wrote wonderfully poetic reports back in the 1920s. Sadly, that aspect of sports writing has been lost to tell-it-like-it-is journalism.
Posted by: BigBoy Bob on 2008-06-16 
I can see how sports reporting has changed. Most of the time I just want the stats, just give me the facts!
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