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National Police Gazette The National Police Gazette, often simply referred to as the Police Gazette, was an American newspaper founded in 1845 by two journalists, Enoch E. Camp and George Wilkes. The editor and proprietor from 1877 until his death in 1922 was Richard Kyle Fox, an immigrant from Ireland, who turned the publication into something close to a national institution. With its focus on lurid crime, sleaze, vice, and bimbos, it was a periodical commonly found in the nation's pool rooms, barber shops, and taverns. Its sexy illustrations and advertisements sometimes challenged the obscenity laws of the day. What really made the Police Gazette popular was its coverage of sports. No other newspaper in the United States covered sports to its extent--especially prize fighting. Published on pink paper, its coverage of major boxing events was so beloved by the public that often 300,000 issues were printed to satisfy demand following an important bout. The usual run was about 150,000 copies--easily enough to make it a gold mine for Fox. Fox started the tradition of awarding championship belts to boxers. Fox died in 1922 and the Great Depression hurt circulation considerably the following decade. Neverthelees the Police Gazette survived as a periodical in various forms until 1977.
Tags: National  Police  Gazette 
Added: 30th January 2014
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Posted By: Lava1964
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