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1924 Canadian Olympic Hockey Team This is a photo of Canada's first Olympic hockey team. At the inaugural Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France in 1924, Canada sent a local amateur team (the Toronto Granites) to compete against the world's best. The results were horribly lopsided, to say the least: Playing three games in three days, Canada overwhelmed their Pool 'A' opponents. The Canadians thumped Czechoslovakia 30-0, Sweden 22-0, and Switzerland 33-0. In the medal round, Canada beat Great Britain 19-2 and the United States 6-1 to capture the gold medals. (Entering that final game, the Americans had outscored Belgium, France, Great Britain and Sweden by an aggregate score of 72-0.) Overall, Canada outscored its five opponents 110-3. Harry Watson scored 37 of Canada's goals. The Canadians' victory was so decisive that Canada was awarded an automatic bye into the final round at the next Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland in 1928. None of the Canadians ever played pro hockey.
Tags: hockey  Olympics  Canada 
Added: 4th March 2010
Views: 1313
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Posted By: Lava1964
Posted by: Marty6697 on 2010-03-04 
Those sound like football scores. Was there a reason they stuck it to them like they did?
Posted by: Lava1964 on 2010-03-04 
The tournament rules pretty much encouraged beatdowns. If the Americans and Canadians had played to a tie in the final game, the tiebreaker would have been goals for and against throughout the tourney. Therefore it was in the best interests of the two strong teams to pummel the six weaklings.
Posted by: Marty6697 on 2010-03-05 
Thanks Lava! I knew there had to be a reason behind those scores. It just doesn't happen today. When a few teams do it in any sport today, they are chastised for it. Thanks again for the info.
Posted by: Marty6697 on 2010-03-05 
Here's a question. When did they start letting professionals in the Olympics? I like the old days of just amateurs,It was much better. Look at Basketball a few years back, and Hockey this year.
Posted by: Lava1964 on 2010-03-06 
Professionalism in the Olympics had varied sport by sport. Tennis pros were allowed in 1984. Basketball pros were okayed in 1992. Hockey pros were allowed in 1998.

I like seeing the best at the Olympics; if they're pros so beit.

The days of true amateurism ended when the communist bloc countries started participating in Helsinki in 1952. The so-called 'amateurs' of the Soviet Union typically trained 50 weeks per year while allegedly serving in the Soviet military. They were more 'professional' than some of our pay-for-play athletes.

Also consider this: The pro hockey players, tennis players, and basketball players have already made their fortunes. They have the true amateur spirit because they are competing for their countries and for the love of the game. Most amateur athletes try to use the Olympics as a springboard for fame and riches.
Posted by: Lava1964 on 2010-03-06 
Marty: Regarding your comment about lopsided scores not happening often today, check out these scores from the 2010 Olympic won's hockey tourney...

Canada 18 Slovakia 0
USA 12 China 0
Canada 10 Switzerland 1
USA 13 Russia 0
Canada 13 Sweden 1
USA 9 Sweden 1

Again, because goals for and against is a tie-breking criterion, the tournament encouarges beatdowns. Yet the IOC is critical of women's hockey because they say only two teams are competitive.

Before you feel sorry for Slovakia for ending up on the wrong side of an 18-0 blowout courtesy of Canada, consider that Slovakia beat Bulgaria 82-0 in an Olympic qualifying tournament. That's right...82-0! (There are highlights of the game on YouTube if you want to look at the carnage.)
Posted by: Marty6697 on 2010-03-06 
Lava, Thanks again for your insight. 82 goals in a 60 min. game dam. Less than a minute per goal. Better than practice Lol!
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