Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Name This Man This man spent most of his life in obscurity, and wasn't famous until after he decided to retire. He took his first Social Security check, and with it, invested in himself, and started a business. He sold it eventually, and he's long gone now, but this business brand is still around today.
Tags:  
Added: 29th March 2009
Views: 1284
Rating:
Posted By: nbmike
Posted by: Lava1964 on 2009-03-29 
I believe that's Colonel Harland Sanders of KFC fame.
Posted by: Nbmike on 2009-03-29 
Absolutely right Lava1964. Good job. The man is the Colonel. He did have a roadhouse restaurant in the 40s and 50s, but due to a new highway bypassing his establishment, he opted to auction it off and only recieved barely enough to pay back debts and taxes. He was not a very smart business man (Sold his American franchises in the 60s for 2 million bucks, and refused stock options, oy)but he was a very talented cook, with many recipes he perfected in his roadhouse, like his now famous fried chicken and baked ham, etc... When his first Social Security check came in, he used it to buy pressure cookers, and started going around to several already established restaurants, touting his chicken recipe, and only collected a nickel on every KFC order. He said that it may not have sounded like much, but after a little while, after getting more than a few owners onboard, he claimed to be making in the area of 1000 dollars a day at one point. After opening his own restaurants, his fame grew more, but he wasn't really a household name until the new owners offered to hire him as their national spokesperson. He was a very benevolent figure though. When time came to decide on what to do with his Canadian franchises, which he kept when he sold the American franchises, he was worried that the foreign taxes would eat up any profits he may encounter, he set up a charitable foundation in Canada, and gave the franchises to the charity. Because of this move, many scholarships were created in his name, any many more in his honor after his demise, due to the franchises revenues.
Posted by: Wikiriwhi on 2009-03-30 
He sounds like he was a man who invested in life rather than finances.

I would say he was a man of very simple tastes with an innovative nature.

Ambition can destroy us as well as suceed us.

If our motives are pure and we can deliver a service, just let the service fulfill its potential. If it's needed it will happen.

$2m was a huge amount in those days.

I think the Colonel was a happy and empowered individual....but was he really a colonel.

He wasn't the only one calling himself a Colonel back then!

Posted by: Nbmike on 2009-03-30 
He was really an honorary colonel, a title bestowed upon him by Kentucky Governor Ruby Laffoon in 1936.

One statement from him that I heard in a TV interview showed me what an optimist the colonel was, There is no such thing as bad weather. Only different types of good weather!

You're right Wiki. The colonel did invest in life more than finances, and while 2 million bucks was a lot of moolah back in the day, refusing the stock options was crazy. If KFC went belly up, he still had his money from the sale, but as we know now, those stocks would have made that 2 mill look like pin money.

Tony Robbins even uses the colonel in his inspirational stories, noting that Col. Sanders had 1009 rejections while trying to sell his chicken method to various restaurant, but kept persevering until success came along.

Finally, while the colonel was a Christian, and considered a model of industry, more than a few franchisees were elated when the sale went through. You see, he had a habit of showing up unannounced at his franchises for inspections. He was methodical on how to prepare his recipe, and if any franchise owner dared to tamper with his preparation method, he wasn't afraid to give them both barrels (no pun intended) in front of staff and customers alike. He was known to revoke franchise licences if the owners didn't follow his method to the letter. Even after the sale, he sued the new owners in the 70s for adding new menu items that he himself didn't create, and using his image to promote them. The parent company unsuccessfully sued him also for libel when he publically declared that the new KFC gravy was sludge, and tasted like wallpaper paste.
Posted by: Electricland on 2009-03-30 
KFC is a big seller in Japan.
I can never understand it. I know the KFC chain is in Europe as well, it's everywhere.
Add A Comment
Sorry, guests can't post comments!