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Dempsey-Carpentier Bout - First Million-Dollar Gate On Saturday, July 2, 1921, world heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey defended his title versus France's Georges Carpentier. The venue was a specially built stadium at a place called Boyle's Thirty Acres in Jersey City, NJ. More than 92,000 fans filled the wooden bowl paying between $5.50 for a distant perch in the far bleachers and $50 for a ringside seat. All told, the crowd paid nearly $1.8 million for the privilege of watching a prize fight--the first time the million-dollar mark had ever been eclipsed. The huge gate was the result of several factors: Dempsey was an exciting heavyweight with plenty of knockouts on his record. Carpentier was a glamorous and handsome French war hero whose every move was followed in the society pages of New York City's newspapers. Thus women attended the fight in huge numbers. (In contrast, Dempsey was disliked in some quarters for having no service record during the First World War.) The fight was broadcast on the new medium of radio for the first time. With the stadium dangerously swaying due to the weight of the enormous crowd, the main event started about 30 minutes early. Before the fight started, promoter Tex Rickard pleaded with Dempsey not to knock out the much smaller Carpentier in the first round so the fans would get their money's worth. Dempsey agreed, but he was solidly hit with a hard right hand from the Frenchman. This was bad news for the challenger: Carpentier broke his thumb with the blow--and he had angered the fearsome champion. Dempsey wore down Carpentier with hard body shots into the fourth round. In that fourth round Carpentier was knocked down twice. The second time he did not get up. Dempsey received $300,000 for about 11 minutes of work.
Tags: boxing  Jack  Dempsey  Georges  Carpentier. 
Added: 19th July 2015
Views: 696
Posted By: Lava1964
Future King Plays Wimbledon Doubles - 1926 In 1926, Sir Louis Greig won the Royal Air Force's tennis championship. In those days of strict amateurism at the top levels of tennis, Greig's victory earned him the right to play in the gentlemen's singles at Wimbledon. He also opted to enter the gentlemen's doubles tournament. Greig chose as his partner a noteworthy someone whom he had mentored and often advised--the Duke of York, the man who would ascend to the British throne in December 1936. Greig and his royal partner faced two other Brits, Arthur Gore and Herbert Roper Barrett, in the first round. Gore and Barrett had little trouble dispatching the future King George VI and Greig 6-1, 6-2, 6-2. Apparently the Duke of York was quite a good sport about being thrashed so handily. Greig fared far better in the gentlemen's singles, advancing to the fourth round. Although there is a frequent royal presence at Wimbledon, the Duke of York remains the only royal to actually have competed at the world's most prestigious tennis tournament.
Tags: tennis  Wimbledon  Duke  of  York  royalty  doubles 
Added: 10th July 2015
Views: 727
Posted By: Lava1964
President Garfields Grandson Expelled From School June 21, 1910.
Tags: William  Howard  Taft  President  of  the  United  States  POTUS  expelled  from  school  Horace  Taft  John  Garfield  James  Garfield  Memorial    memorial  soldiers  and  sailors  June  21  1910   
Added: 3rd July 2015
Views: 634
Posted By: Steve
Theda Bara - Forgotten Movie Star Theda Bara is a largely forgotten movie star for two reasons: Her career ended in 1926 so she did not make a single sound film, and most of her 40 feature films were lost in a 1937 studio vault fire. Although she was born in Cincinnati in 1885, studio publicists tried to make her ancestry more exotic than it really was. At one point Bara was listed as being born in a Middle Eastern desert to French and Arabian parents. Bara's faux first name was either a childhood nickname or an anagram of the word 'death'--depending on which fan magazine you read. Her birth name was Theodosia Burr Goodman. Be that as it may, Bara became very famous for her portrayal of Cleopatra in a 1917 feature film. She wore a risque costume and described herself as a 'vamp'--an abbreviation of the word vampire. Only a few seconds of her breakthrough performance survives. She declared she would continue playing vamps 'as long as people sin.' After getting married in 1921, Bara only made two more films before retiring five years later. She died of stomach cancer in 1955 at age 69. Only four of her films are known to exist.
Tags: Theda  Bara  silent  films  star  vamp  Cleopatra 
Added: 23rd June 2015
Views: 970
Posted By: Lava1964
Gain Weight Skinny Girls From sometime in the 1930s (I think) this print ad promotes a product called Ironized Yeast to help self-conscious skinny girls put on a few pounds to make them more desirable to men.
Tags: ad  skinny  girls 
Added: 22nd June 2015
Views: 1255
Posted By: Lava1964
Pot Of Beans Thrown At Prince William July 10, 1910 a pot of beans was thrown at Prince Frederick William missing him and striking a police officer. The writing style of reporters have certainly changed!
Tags: July  10,  1910  pot  of  beans  rince  Frederick  William  crazy  woman  Grenadier  Guards  policeman  wound  maniac   
Added: 20th June 2015
Views: 613
Posted By: Steve
Reporting Changes From 1910 I own a local reporting website in the Bridgeport CT area called DoingItLocal.com and started researching papers from an earlier era. This was 1910 and the writing style sure was different!
Tags: The  Bridgeport  Farmer  Imbecile  mentally  challenged  insane  man  425  Hancock  Avenue  Bridgeport  CT  shanty 
Added: 20th June 2015
Views: 740
Posted By: Steve
Polio Ward Photo This photo from the 1930s shows a hospital's polio ward where children were placed in iron lungs to assist their breathing. Polio epidemics were a frequent occurrence in the first half of the 20th century in industrialized countries. They were actually a strange bi-product of affluence. By the beginning of the 20th century, a significant amount of babies were being born in the antiseptic conditions of hospitals rather than at home. This meant that many infants were not exposed to the polio virus and thus did not build up an immunity to it. Therefore when they were exposed to it later in life, they were vulnerable. Although the disease mostly afflicted children, adults were not necessarily immune. (President Franklin Roosevelt was crippled by polio at age 39.) The polio virus moved from one person to the next via human bodily fluids. Children who sneezed and coughed were the main culprits. The first symptoms varied. Sometime people had runny noses, sore throats, or aches. However, the minor discomforts could quickly change to partial paralysis if it struck one's central nervous system. Whenever a major polio outbreak hit, many public facilities such as swimming pools and parks would shut down. The last major outbreak occurred in 1952. By the mid-1950s the Salk and Saban vaccines had done much to eradicate the virus from North America.
Tags: polio  ward  photo 
Added: 16th June 2015
Views: 782
Posted By: Lava1964
Bedroom of WWI Soldier Unchanged Since 1918 In October 2014, a French publication reported on a remarkable tribute to one of France's fallen soldiers from the First World War. A home in Belabre, a small central French village, contains a young man's bedroom that has remained unchanged since its occupant died in the final year of the Great War. Dragoon officer Hubert Rochereau was killed in Belgium on April 26, 1918. His grieving parents, as a tribute to their late son, left his room exactly as it was the last time he set foot in it. Over the years the house has changed ownership numerous times, but each new owner has kept the promise not to alter the bedroom's appearance that accompanied the original sales agreement made by the Rocherau family--although it is completely unenforceable by law. The room contains several articles of clothing, photographs, books, and other personal effects. The mayor of Belabre hopes the recent publicity surrounding the bedroom will eventually lead to the house being converted into a museum.
Tags: bedroom  WWI  soldier  France 
Added: 14th June 2015
Views: 932
Posted By: Lava1964
Judy Garland - Zing Went The Strings of My Heart In 1935, 13-year-old Judy Garland sang Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart in her audition for MGM. Apparently the audition went well. He she is three years later performing it in the 1938 film Listen, Darling.
Tags: Judy  Garland  MGM  Zing  Went  the  Strings  of  My  Heart 
Added: 10th June 2015
Views: 1059
Posted By: Lava1964

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