Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Roy Rogers Dont Fence Me In Tags: Roy  Rogers  Don't  Fence  Me  In  Hollywood  Canteen  Trigger 
Added: 26th July 2015
Views: 747
Posted By: Old Fart
Verdun Ossuary - 1964 Most Americans are barely aware of it, but one of the most terrible battles in history occurred near the northern French city of Verdun from February through November 1916. The Germans launched a massive attack on February 21 with both numerical superiority and the element of surprise. Verdun was supposed to be a quiet French sector on the Western Front and was held largely by lightly regarded territorial troops. The Germans hoped to bleed the French army to at least force an armistice on the Western Front. The embattled French considered the defense of Verdun to be symbolic of resistance. "They shall not pass!" became the rallying cry of the defenders. At some point during the battle virtually every able-bodied French soldier served at the Verdun front. The carnage was atrocious as positions sometimes changed hands several times each day. Eventually the German High Command called off the attack. In those nine months of ceaseless fighting casualties approached one million, with at least 500,000 killed. In 1964 Life magazine published a pictorial feature about what Verdun looked like 48 years after the battle. Perhaps the most shocking photo was the one shown here: An ossuary containing the bones of about 130,000 unknown soldiers from both sides. Interestingly, Life's photographer was Alfred Eisenstaedt--a German veteran of the war.
Tags: Verdun  battle  ossuary  First  World  War 
Added: 22nd July 2015
Views: 647
Posted By: Lava1964
1901 Exhumation of Abraham Lincoln Here's a weird factoid: Since his assassination in 1865, Abraham Lincoln's remains have been exhumed or disinterred 17 times--and his coffin has been opened five times. Some of the exhumations have been totally understandable. His body was moved in and out of several temporary vaults while awaiting "permanent" burial. One unplanned exhumation happened in 1876. Lincoln's coffin was removed from its marble sarcophagus by a group of grave robbers who were caught almost immediately. Other times the Lincoln Tomb fell into a state of disrepair because the ground in was built upon was too soft. Thus Lincoln's body was removed and shabbily stored in the structure's basement pending the reconstruction work. Each time the coffin itself was actually disturbed, the guardians insisted on opening the casket to ensure Lincoln's remains were actually still inside. The last time this occurred was in 1901 when more renovations were done on Lincoln's deteriorating tomb to make the location more visitor friendly. Lincoln's coffin--which had been encased in a steel cage and buried beneath 10 feet of concrete as a means of discouraging grave robbers--was once more exhumed during the renovations. About 23 workers were on hand to see Lincoln re-interred one last time on September 26, 1901. Out of curiosity they checked the coffin once more to see if Abe was still there. He was. Although his face had turned a chalky white color, the corpse was remarkably well preserved after more than 36 years. Witnesses said that Lincoln's eyebrows were missing and the gloves upon his hands had rotted. Otherwise the face was instantly recognizable to anyone who had ever seen a photo of the famous president. It still bore the famous whiskers, mole, and a full head of wiry hair. The suit Lincoln was buried in--the same one he had worn to his 1865 inauguration--was still intact although it was covered in a fine yellow mold. There were also shreds of a disintegrated American flag upon the corpse. The last living person to have seen Lincoln's corpse was a 14-year-old boy named Fleetwood Lindley. Lindley's father had been one of the construction workers and had urged him to leave school early that day and go to Lincoln's Tomb to see something he would never forget. The boy was also permitted to hold one of the straps that lowered Lincoln's coffin back into its concrete cocoon. Interviewed by the Chicago Tribune about the experience in 1962, Lindley said seeing Lincoln's corpse did not bother him at first, but he said he had trouble sleeping for months afterward. Lindley died in February 1963 at the age of 75 just a few days after giving a final interview on the subject.
Tags: Abraham  Lincoln  exhumation  1901 
Added: 21st July 2015
Views: 1457
Posted By: Lava1964
Selfies In The 1920s Tags: Selfies  In  The  1920s  photography  photos  portraits  kodak  film 
Added: 20th July 2015
Views: 405
Posted By: Cathy
Dempsey-Carpentier Bout - First Million-Dollar Gate On Saturday, July 2, 1921, world heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey defended his title versus France's Georges Carpentier. The venue was a specially built stadium at a place called Boyle's Thirty Acres in Jersey City, NJ. More than 92,000 fans filled the wooden bowl paying between $5.50 for a distant perch in the far bleachers and $50 for a ringside seat. All told, the crowd paid nearly $1.8 million for the privilege of watching a prize fight--the first time the million-dollar mark had ever been eclipsed. The huge gate was the result of several factors: Dempsey was an exciting heavyweight with plenty of knockouts on his record. Carpentier was a glamorous and handsome French war hero whose every move was followed in the society pages of New York City's newspapers. Thus women attended the fight in huge numbers. (In contrast, Dempsey was disliked in some quarters for having no service record during the First World War.) The fight was broadcast on the new medium of radio for the first time. With the stadium dangerously swaying due to the weight of the enormous crowd, the main event started about 30 minutes early. Before the fight started, promoter Tex Rickard pleaded with Dempsey not to knock out the much smaller Carpentier in the first round so the fans would get their money's worth. Dempsey agreed, but he was solidly hit with a hard right hand from the Frenchman. This was bad news for the challenger: Carpentier broke his thumb with the blow--and he had angered the fearsome champion. Dempsey wore down Carpentier with hard body shots into the fourth round. In that fourth round Carpentier was knocked down twice. The second time he did not get up. Dempsey received $300,000 for about 11 minutes of work.
Tags: boxing  Jack  Dempsey  Georges  Carpentier. 
Added: 19th July 2015
Views: 485
Posted By: Lava1964
Future King Plays Wimbledon Doubles - 1926 In 1926, Sir Louis Greig won the Royal Air Force's tennis championship. In those days of strict amateurism at the top levels of tennis, Greig's victory earned him the right to play in the gentlemen's singles at Wimbledon. He also opted to enter the gentlemen's doubles tournament. Greig chose as his partner a noteworthy someone whom he had mentored and often advised--the Duke of York, the man who would ascend to the British throne in December 1936. Greig and his royal partner faced two other Brits, Arthur Gore and Herbert Roper Barrett, in the first round. Gore and Barrett had little trouble dispatching the future King George VI and Greig 6-1, 6-2, 6-2. Apparently the Duke of York was quite a good sport about being thrashed so handily. Greig fared far better in the gentlemen's singles, advancing to the fourth round. Although there is a frequent royal presence at Wimbledon, the Duke of York remains the only royal to actually have competed at the world's most prestigious tennis tournament.
Tags: tennis  Wimbledon  Duke  of  York  royalty  doubles 
Added: 10th July 2015
Views: 491
Posted By: Lava1964
President Garfields Grandson Expelled From School June 21, 1910.
Tags: William  Howard  Taft  President  of  the  United  States  POTUS  expelled  from  school  Horace  Taft  John  Garfield  James  Garfield  Memorial    memorial  soldiers  and  sailors  June  21  1910   
Added: 3rd July 2015
Views: 419
Posted By: Steve
Theda Bara - Forgotten Movie Star Theda Bara is a largely forgotten movie star for two reasons: Her career ended in 1926 so she did not make a single sound film, and most of her 40 feature films were lost in a 1937 studio vault fire. Although she was born in Cincinnati in 1885, studio publicists tried to make her ancestry more exotic than it really was. At one point Bara was listed as being born in a Middle Eastern desert to French and Arabian parents. Bara's faux first name was either a childhood nickname or an anagram of the word 'death'--depending on which fan magazine you read. Her birth name was Theodosia Burr Goodman. Be that as it may, Bara became very famous for her portrayal of Cleopatra in a 1917 feature film. She wore a risque costume and described herself as a 'vamp'--an abbreviation of the word vampire. Only a few seconds of her breakthrough performance survives. She declared she would continue playing vamps 'as long as people sin.' After getting married in 1921, Bara only made two more films before retiring five years later. She died of stomach cancer in 1955 at age 69. Only four of her films are known to exist.
Tags: Theda  Bara  silent  films  star  vamp  Cleopatra 
Added: 23rd June 2015
Views: 689
Posted By: Lava1964
Gain Weight Skinny Girls From sometime in the 1930s (I think) this print ad promotes a product called Ironized Yeast to help self-conscious skinny girls put on a few pounds to make them more desirable to men.
Tags: ad  skinny  girls 
Added: 22nd June 2015
Views: 903
Posted By: Lava1964
Pot Of Beans Thrown At Prince William July 10, 1910 a pot of beans was thrown at Prince Frederick William missing him and striking a police officer. The writing style of reporters have certainly changed!
Tags: July  10,  1910  pot  of  beans  rince  Frederick  William  crazy  woman  Grenadier  Guards  policeman  wound  maniac   
Added: 20th June 2015
Views: 422
Posted By: Steve

Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 8 9 10 11 of 100 |